Collaboration

3 Questions: Putting a lid on personal Web use

A COO of a medical practice talks about why he uses an enterprise Internet access management application called WebSense.


With Bart Doroshuk, president and COO of Washington ENT Group, a Washington, D.C., medical practice that uses an integrated electronic medical record and practice management (PM) system. Internet access is a part of doing business, but the practice must comply with stringent HIPAA rules about privacy. Doroshuk uses an enterprise Internet access management app called WebSense to control when and how employees use the Web.

This interview first appeared in Integrating the Enterprise. Subscribe to this report now!


Question:
It seems like personal use of the office Internet connection is a fact of life these days, and you've officially acknowledged it. How does WebSense help you keep it under control?

Doroshuk: Most of the jobs in our company require some access to the Internet, and if our employees can go out and conduct business on the Internet, they are also going to conduct personal business. I don't want my employees going all over the Internet, and WebSense removes the struggle because I can customize it. And it removes my worry about employees wasting time online.


Question: What's your strategy for personal access time?

Doroshuk: I allow 60 minutes per day, and we encourage people to use it during the lunch hour. But they can parse it out throughout the day. If at 10 in the morning they want to check delivery of a package on the FedEx site, they should be able to do it. We do have employees that actively shop on the Web using our access. In fact, we encourage it. I'd rather have someone spend their lunch hour here shopping on the Internet than walking around town for an hour. If I'm short-handed, I can ask them, "Can I borrow you for a minute?" I'm enticing my employees to have lunch at their desks.


Question: What about restricting access to different Web sites?

Doroshuk: I don't spend a lot of time watching where they're going. I don't care if they want to go to shopping.com to get the latest outfit for the weekend. I just care about them going to malicious sites. We let people go to banking institutions for a certain amount of time. I think people are very interested in their investments and the stock market, and the natural thing is to go to a financial Web site and peek. What I don't want is them day-trading.

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