Storage

Apple shipping the Mark Webber of hard drives

The hard drives within Apple computers seem to pull mechnical failure and random incidents into play whenever you think things are fine -- just like our man in F1: M. Webber.
Any Australian with an interest in Formula 1 would know the exploits of Mark Webber. The boy from Queenbeayan can always pull out a mechanical failure or a random incident whenever he is in a good position -- I'm thinking especially of the Japanese GP this year -- which resulted in his nickname "the DNF man".
(If you have no idea who Webber is, watch this "highlights" package. I recommend having the sound turned down though.)

Likewise, the hard drives within Apple computers seem to pull mechnical failure and random incidents into play whenever you think things are fine. The laptop I am writing from has already had a hard drive fail and one of the file b-trees fatally injure itself -- the iMacs in our office have had three or four re-formats in the space of 12 months.

Fast forward to yesterday where one suspect iMac is doing its best to make it to fresh format #5 and a Macbook has decided that its hard drive is now corrupt.

This is the sort of carnage I have not seen since the 2003 Dell laptops ran out of warranty (there too, it was a case of hard drive failure).

Why does this happen?

Are the hard drives being pushed too hard? Perhaps.
Is HFS simply too easy to break? Empirically it would seem so.
Are the hard drives simply not good enough? The evidence points to yes.
Bad luck? Maybe the first time, but it is too regular for that now.

Add into the equation the scintillating and expedient quality of Apple service and what you are left with is a multiple-week wait for a fresh hard drive. Give any tech head a new hard drive and watch as they install it themselves in 15 minutes, but of course Big Daddy Jobs says that's a "no-no" and voids the warranty.

It's a shame that you can put a good driver in a crummy car and get good results at times, but watch the tears as the crummy car lets the driver down time after time. That's F1 and it appears more and more to be the Apple experience too.

Maybe 2008 will be the year Webber wins his first Grand Prix and Apple sorts out its hardware issues.

One can only dream.

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Some would say that it is a long way from software engineering to journalism, others would correctly argue that it is a mere 10 metres according to the floor plan.During his first five years with CBS Interactive, Chris started his journalistic advent...

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