Security

Are you prepared for the threat from within?

Recent statistics show an insider is more likely to compromise your company's security than an outsider hacker. Here are four articles to help you stop the threat from within.


Hackers continue to make the headlines, but the biggest threat to your company’s security may actually come from inside.

A Computer Security Institute/FBI report released this spring revealed that 71 percent of unauthorized electronic access came from within the organization, compared to only 25 percent penetration by outsiders.

When you consider that a company employee is more likely to assault your systems than an outsider, it makes sense to improve security from the inside out. Here are four articles that can help you deal with the threat from within.

Security experts classify internal security threats in three categories: bribery, social engineering, and group collusion, according to “The reality of internal security breaches.” This article examines these three threats and includes tips from security expert David Morrow, the cyberforensics manager at Ernst & Young and a former U.S. Air Force investigator.

But what if you suspect the thief is a member of your IT division? ”Stopping an internal security threat” covers the basics for building a solid case and includes advice from the president of the Silicon Valley Chapter of High Technology Crime Investigation Association (HTCIA).

If a security breach does happen, you’ll have to deal with more than the culprit and the legal fall-out. In “Keep employee morale high,” TechRepublic examines how an investigation can affect your entire enterprise and provides tips on recovering from management’s embarrassment and controlling the spread of paranoia.

You may also be surprised to learn that your security breach is making headlines. “Managing a public relations crisis” explains how to cope with the media frenzy that may follow a security compromise.

For a more complete look at security, you can download our updated list of security links.
One security company’s advertisement features innocent-looking employees sporting labels like “The Mad Day Trader,” “The Download King,” and “The Disgruntled Saboteur.” The point? Employees regularly engage in activities—from e-mailing corporate secrets to downloading excessive material—that present a threat to network security. Share your main internal security threats with us via e-mail or by posting below.
Hackers continue to make the headlines, but the biggest threat to your company’s security may actually come from inside.

A Computer Security Institute/FBI report released this spring revealed that 71 percent of unauthorized electronic access came from within the organization, compared to only 25 percent penetration by outsiders.

When you consider that a company employee is more likely to assault your systems than an outsider, it makes sense to improve security from the inside out. Here are four articles that can help you deal with the threat from within.

Security experts classify internal security threats in three categories: bribery, social engineering, and group collusion, according to “The reality of internal security breaches.” This article examines these three threats and includes tips from security expert David Morrow, the cyberforensics manager at Ernst & Young and a former U.S. Air Force investigator.

But what if you suspect the thief is a member of your IT division? ”Stopping an internal security threat” covers the basics for building a solid case and includes advice from the president of the Silicon Valley Chapter of High Technology Crime Investigation Association (HTCIA).

If a security breach does happen, you’ll have to deal with more than the culprit and the legal fall-out. In “Keep employee morale high,” TechRepublic examines how an investigation can affect your entire enterprise and provides tips on recovering from management’s embarrassment and controlling the spread of paranoia.

You may also be surprised to learn that your security breach is making headlines. “Managing a public relations crisis” explains how to cope with the media frenzy that may follow a security compromise.

For a more complete look at security, you can download our updated list of security links.
One security company’s advertisement features innocent-looking employees sporting labels like “The Mad Day Trader,” “The Download King,” and “The Disgruntled Saboteur.” The point? Employees regularly engage in activities—from e-mailing corporate secrets to downloading excessive material—that present a threat to network security. Share your main internal security threats with us via e-mail or by posting below.

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