Networking

Are you ready for Bluetooth technology?

Bluetooth technology is expected to drive wireless technology to new heights. But what do you really know about it? Brush up on Bluetooth with these TechRepublic articles.


If you aren’t sure what Bluetooth technology is or what it can do for you, you’d better get up to speed fast. The first Bluetooth-enabled products are expected to hit the streets by mid-year—that means now—according to Dataquest, a division of Gartner that specializes in interpreting IT market data. (TechRepublic is an independent subsidiary of Gartner, a leading IT research firm.)

We’ve found three articles that will help you understand this new technology and its implications in your day-to-day business operations.

Bluetooth promises to make wires and computer cables irrelevant. This technology enables your computer and PDA, for instance, to communicate via radio waves. Experts say this could alter how we stay connected, not only to our LANs, but also to each other.

You will soon be able to connect to the Internet on your handheld using Bluetooth, according to Robert O’Hara, who leads Microsoft’s design team for microbrowser technology for cellular telephones. See what else O’Hara and other experts predict for the future in “Preparing for the wild, wild wireless world.”

Cahner’s In-Stat Group found that most survey respondents want high speed Internet access with their wireless services. For other wireless statistics, see “StatCenter: The wireless market."


Bluetooth won’t just be a new road warrior tool. It could also change the way you work, according to TechRepublic columnist Tim Landgrave. “How wireless and high-speed technology will change your office” provides a glimpse at how Bluetooth and other wireless technologies will alter the workplace.

Didn’t futurists make similar predictions for infrared? Well, yes. And like infrared, Bluetooth is not a wireless panacea. In “Bluetooth wireless: Fine-tuning the radio signals ,” CIO Community Editor Paul Baldwin examines the promises and pitfalls of this emerging technology.
If you could make one item wireless, what would it be? Dream with us via e-mail or by posting below.
If you aren’t sure what Bluetooth technology is or what it can do for you, you’d better get up to speed fast. The first Bluetooth-enabled products are expected to hit the streets by mid-year—that means now—according to Dataquest, a division of Gartner that specializes in interpreting IT market data. (TechRepublic is an independent subsidiary of Gartner, a leading IT research firm.)

We’ve found three articles that will help you understand this new technology and its implications in your day-to-day business operations.

Bluetooth promises to make wires and computer cables irrelevant. This technology enables your computer and PDA, for instance, to communicate via radio waves. Experts say this could alter how we stay connected, not only to our LANs, but also to each other.

You will soon be able to connect to the Internet on your handheld using Bluetooth, according to Robert O’Hara, who leads Microsoft’s design team for microbrowser technology for cellular telephones. See what else O’Hara and other experts predict for the future in “Preparing for the wild, wild wireless world.”

Cahner’s In-Stat Group found that most survey respondents want high speed Internet access with their wireless services. For other wireless statistics, see “StatCenter: The wireless market."


Bluetooth won’t just be a new road warrior tool. It could also change the way you work, according to TechRepublic columnist Tim Landgrave. “How wireless and high-speed technology will change your office” provides a glimpse at how Bluetooth and other wireless technologies will alter the workplace.

Didn’t futurists make similar predictions for infrared? Well, yes. And like infrared, Bluetooth is not a wireless panacea. In “Bluetooth wireless: Fine-tuning the radio signals ,” CIO Community Editor Paul Baldwin examines the promises and pitfalls of this emerging technology.
If you could make one item wireless, what would it be? Dream with us via e-mail or by posting below.

Editor's Picks

Free Newsletters, In your Inbox