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Build Your Skills: Sharpen your Windows 2000 skills with these tips

Tips on Microsoft Windows 2000 that will save administrators time and effort


Are you looking for a simple way to learn more about Windows 2000 Professional? We’ve got the answer with our Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. This message contains valuable information that can save you time and effort. Below, you’ll find an example of what the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail has to offer. Get valuable tips, links to Windows resources, and much more, all delivered straight to your inbox—absolutely free. Sign up for the Windows 2000 TechMail today!

Use FTP from a console
Most advanced users and IT professionals are familiar with File Transfer Protocol (FTP), which enables file transfer across the Internet. You can use a Web browser such as Internet Explorer to connect to, browse, and initiate uploads and downloads from FTP sites. This is a useful option when you only need to upload or download a few files.

But what about the times when you need to download a lot of files? You may want to use a third-party FTP utility (which can be found at download sites such as Tucows) or you can use the FTP command from a console. Even though it isn't necessarily user-friendly, the FTP console command offers considerable flexibility and power, particularly when working with a large selection of files.

To use FTP, open a command console and issue the command FTP. The prompt will change to
ftp>

to indicate that you're working in an FTP session. Type
Open

and the DNS name or IP address of the FTP site. For example:
ftp>open ftp.microsoft.com

The FTP utility provides several commands for navigating directories, setting the file mode for download (text or binary), downloading files, uploading files, and more. Here are the most common commands:
  • CD (Change Directory): Use to change to another directory on the server
  • PWD (Print Working Directory): Shows you the current directory on the server
  • BIN: Sets the file transfer mode to binary for transferring binary files
  • GET <file>: Downloads the file specified by the <file> string
  • PUT <file>: Uploads the file specified by the <file> string
  • LCD <path>: Sets the current local directory to <path>
  • CLOSE: Closes the current FTP connection
  • BYE: Exits the FTP utility

The FTP utility includes several other commands, as well. MGET, for example, downloads multiple files. To view the list of FTP commands, simply type
Help

at any FTP prompt. Type
Help <command>

to get help on a specific command. Enter an exclamation mark to exit to a DOS shell if you need to issue non-FTP commands during a session, and then type
Exit

to return to the FTP session.

Re-create a deleted Show Desktop icon
By default, the Show Desktop icon appears in Windows 2000's Quick Launch toolbar (which is to the right of the Start menu). With Show Desktop, you can view your desktop quickly when you have several applications open without minimizing each application individually.

Did you know that Show Desktop is actually a script? If your Show Desktop item has been deleted, you can re-create the script quite easily. Or perhaps you'd like to create a Show Desktop item in a different folder. Simply follow these steps:
  1. Use Notepad to create a text file with the following contents:
    [Shell]
    Command=2
    IconFile=explorer.exe,3
    [Taskbar]
    Command=ToggleDesktop
  2. Save the file as Showdesktop.scf. (You can name it something else if you prefer, but make sure you use the .scf file extension.)
  3. Place the file in the %systemroot%\System32 folder and close Notepad.
  4. Right-click the file you created and select Create Shortcut.
  5. Rename the shortcut Show Desktop.

The Show Desktop shortcut should now appear automatically in the Quick Launch toolbar. If it doesn't, drag a copy of the shortcut to the toolbar.

Get great Windows 2000 tips like this one sent directly to your inbox!
If you would like to read more Windows 2000 tips, sign up for the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article by sending us an e-mail or by posting a comment below.

 

Are you looking for a simple way to learn more about Windows 2000 Professional? We’ve got the answer with our Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. This message contains valuable information that can save you time and effort. Below, you’ll find an example of what the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail has to offer. Get valuable tips, links to Windows resources, and much more, all delivered straight to your inbox—absolutely free. Sign up for the Windows 2000 TechMail today!

Use FTP from a console
Most advanced users and IT professionals are familiar with File Transfer Protocol (FTP), which enables file transfer across the Internet. You can use a Web browser such as Internet Explorer to connect to, browse, and initiate uploads and downloads from FTP sites. This is a useful option when you only need to upload or download a few files.

But what about the times when you need to download a lot of files? You may want to use a third-party FTP utility (which can be found at download sites such as Tucows) or you can use the FTP command from a console. Even though it isn't necessarily user-friendly, the FTP console command offers considerable flexibility and power, particularly when working with a large selection of files.

To use FTP, open a command console and issue the command FTP. The prompt will change to
ftp>

to indicate that you're working in an FTP session. Type
Open

and the DNS name or IP address of the FTP site. For example:
ftp>open ftp.microsoft.com

The FTP utility provides several commands for navigating directories, setting the file mode for download (text or binary), downloading files, uploading files, and more. Here are the most common commands:
  • CD (Change Directory): Use to change to another directory on the server
  • PWD (Print Working Directory): Shows you the current directory on the server
  • BIN: Sets the file transfer mode to binary for transferring binary files
  • GET <file>: Downloads the file specified by the <file> string
  • PUT <file>: Uploads the file specified by the <file> string
  • LCD <path>: Sets the current local directory to <path>
  • CLOSE: Closes the current FTP connection
  • BYE: Exits the FTP utility

The FTP utility includes several other commands, as well. MGET, for example, downloads multiple files. To view the list of FTP commands, simply type
Help

at any FTP prompt. Type
Help <command>

to get help on a specific command. Enter an exclamation mark to exit to a DOS shell if you need to issue non-FTP commands during a session, and then type
Exit

to return to the FTP session.

Re-create a deleted Show Desktop icon
By default, the Show Desktop icon appears in Windows 2000's Quick Launch toolbar (which is to the right of the Start menu). With Show Desktop, you can view your desktop quickly when you have several applications open without minimizing each application individually.

Did you know that Show Desktop is actually a script? If your Show Desktop item has been deleted, you can re-create the script quite easily. Or perhaps you'd like to create a Show Desktop item in a different folder. Simply follow these steps:
  1. Use Notepad to create a text file with the following contents:
    [Shell]
    Command=2
    IconFile=explorer.exe,3
    [Taskbar]
    Command=ToggleDesktop
  2. Save the file as Showdesktop.scf. (You can name it something else if you prefer, but make sure you use the .scf file extension.)
  3. Place the file in the %systemroot%\System32 folder and close Notepad.
  4. Right-click the file you created and select Create Shortcut.
  5. Rename the shortcut Show Desktop.

The Show Desktop shortcut should now appear automatically in the Quick Launch toolbar. If it doesn't, drag a copy of the shortcut to the toolbar.

Get great Windows 2000 tips like this one sent directly to your inbox!
If you would like to read more Windows 2000 tips, sign up for the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article by sending us an e-mail or by posting a comment below.

 

About Bill Detwiler

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

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