Tech & Work

CIOpen Forum: Background checks

In our latest CIOpen Forum, a TechRepublic member wants to know how much she can legally ask a prospective employee's former bosses about work history. The winning answer will receive a $25 gift certificate from Fatbrain.

Every other Monday, we’ll present you with a question submitted by a TechRepublic member. We’ll select an answer from those sent to us by our readers and award a $25 Fatbrain gift certificate to the person who submits the best solution. Let's begin with the winning answer for our March 20 question.
Diane’s dilemma
Diane Spino, president of 123 Net Commerce, an Internet consulting company, was trying to find the best commercial software to handle Internet advertising management and billing, including third-party billing, for one of her clients. She wanted the system to be capable of serving advertisements according to the visitors' demographic characteristics, which users provide when they sign up.

The solution
Scott Geiger, systems information manager for The Baby Corner, recommended two vendors that have the software she’s looking for: AdForce and Burst!. Congratulations, Scott!

Our next question
For this week’s question, a TechRepublic member, who asks that we not use her name, is in the process of hiring a new IT Manager. The prospective employee’s references are good, but she wants to know how he performed on the job.

She wants to know if there are limits to what she can ask past employers about the potential employee’s work history. What’s off limits? What can you discuss?

“I’d like to know how they performed on the job,” she wrote. “But I’m not interested in getting sued.”

Have an answer?
Do you know how to get what you need out of background checks? Post a comment at the bottom of the page, or send an e-mail to the CIORepublic editor. All answers must be received no later than Monday, April 10, 2000. If your answer is chosen as the best one, you'll receive a $25 gift certificate to Fatbrain.
By submitting your answer, you agree to let TechRepublic publish your solution on its Web site. You also agree that TechRepublic may adapt and edit and authorize the adaptation and editing of each submission as it deems necessary. TechRepublic may publish a submission at its sole discretion.

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