Microsoft

Configure IT Quick: Fine-tune Windows 2000 Pro with these quick tips

Save memory and resources and simplify navigating command consoles in Windows 2000.


Are you looking for a simple way to learn more about Windows 2000 Professional? We've got the answer with our Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. This message contains valuable information that can save you time and effort. Below, you'll find several examples of what the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail has to offer. Get valuable tips, links to Windows resources, and much more, all delivered straight to your inbox—absolutely free. Sign up for the Windows 2000 TechMail today!

Save memory and resources by eliminating services
Windows 2000 includes a lot of services that support networking; however, each of these services need memory and system resources to run. Although these services are required if your computer resides on a network, Windows 2000 systems that run as stand-alone machines don't necessarily need all of them. Disabling these services can free up memory and resources.

To disable the services, go to Start | Settings | Control Panel and double-click Administrative Tools and then double-click Settings. Now double-click a particular service and then set the service's Startup mode to Disabled.

Here are just a few of the services that can be disabled in Windows 2000 (if your computer isn't connected to a network):
  • Alerter: This sends alert messages across the LAN when specific types of events occur, such as service failures.
  • Computer Browser: This enables you to browse the LAN for shared resources such as printers and shared folders.
  • DHCP Client: This enables your computer to retrieve an IP address from a DHCP server. (If you're not on a network, you don't need an IP address, which is why this service would be unnecessary.)
  • Net Logon: This handles logon events for your computer in the domain.
  • Network DDE and Network DDE DSDM: This supports Dynamic Data Exchange sessions between network computers.
  • TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper: This enables support for NetBIOS over TCP/IP and NetBIOS name resolution.

Other useful services that you may want to consider eliminating are the Task Scheduler service (if you never schedule jobs for execution) or the DNS Client service (if you don't use the computer to connect to the Internet).

Out of the numerous services listed in the Settings folder, there are bound to be (at least) a few services that you could disable in order to free up some much-needed memory.

Simplify navigating command consoles
Those of you who use a command console quite a bit are probably old pros at moving around the directory structure. But even if you can type 70 words a minute, typing long strings to change directories can be a real pain.

An easy way around this problem is to use a wildcard rather than specifying the entire folder name. For example, instead of typing
CD "\Program Files,"

try to type the 8.3 DOS name for the folder:
CD \PR*

Windows 2000 will make the closest directory that matches the specified string active, which in this case is any directory starting with PR. To move back to the previous directory, type:
CD ..

(the CD command followed by two periods). Or you can use the two periods to move to a folder that resides in the parent of the current folder. For example, if the \Program Files\Office folder is currently active and you want to go to the \Program Files\Adobe folder, type:
CD ..\ADOBE

Another useful shortcut is the ability to drag folder names from Explorer into a DOS console window. Simply open the console and type the portion of the command up to the point where you would otherwise start typing the path. Locate the folder in Explorer and drag it into the DOS console window. The console will insert the path string at the cursor.

Note: If the directory you're attempting to move is ambiguous, you may receive either a Directory In Use error or Invalid Directory error. To make it work properly, add a few more characters to the string. For example, if CD P* generates an error, try CD PRO* to open the Program Files folder.

Get great Windows 2000 tips like these sent directly to your inbox!
If you would like to read more Windows 2000 tips, sign up for the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article and the TechMail. Send us an e-mail or post a comment below.

 

Are you looking for a simple way to learn more about Windows 2000 Professional? We've got the answer with our Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. This message contains valuable information that can save you time and effort. Below, you'll find several examples of what the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail has to offer. Get valuable tips, links to Windows resources, and much more, all delivered straight to your inbox—absolutely free. Sign up for the Windows 2000 TechMail today!

Save memory and resources by eliminating services
Windows 2000 includes a lot of services that support networking; however, each of these services need memory and system resources to run. Although these services are required if your computer resides on a network, Windows 2000 systems that run as stand-alone machines don't necessarily need all of them. Disabling these services can free up memory and resources.

To disable the services, go to Start | Settings | Control Panel and double-click Administrative Tools and then double-click Settings. Now double-click a particular service and then set the service's Startup mode to Disabled.

Here are just a few of the services that can be disabled in Windows 2000 (if your computer isn't connected to a network):
  • Alerter: This sends alert messages across the LAN when specific types of events occur, such as service failures.
  • Computer Browser: This enables you to browse the LAN for shared resources such as printers and shared folders.
  • DHCP Client: This enables your computer to retrieve an IP address from a DHCP server. (If you're not on a network, you don't need an IP address, which is why this service would be unnecessary.)
  • Net Logon: This handles logon events for your computer in the domain.
  • Network DDE and Network DDE DSDM: This supports Dynamic Data Exchange sessions between network computers.
  • TCP/IP NetBIOS Helper: This enables support for NetBIOS over TCP/IP and NetBIOS name resolution.

Other useful services that you may want to consider eliminating are the Task Scheduler service (if you never schedule jobs for execution) or the DNS Client service (if you don't use the computer to connect to the Internet).

Out of the numerous services listed in the Settings folder, there are bound to be (at least) a few services that you could disable in order to free up some much-needed memory.

Simplify navigating command consoles
Those of you who use a command console quite a bit are probably old pros at moving around the directory structure. But even if you can type 70 words a minute, typing long strings to change directories can be a real pain.

An easy way around this problem is to use a wildcard rather than specifying the entire folder name. For example, instead of typing
CD "\Program Files,"

try to type the 8.3 DOS name for the folder:
CD \PR*

Windows 2000 will make the closest directory that matches the specified string active, which in this case is any directory starting with PR. To move back to the previous directory, type:
CD ..

(the CD command followed by two periods). Or you can use the two periods to move to a folder that resides in the parent of the current folder. For example, if the \Program Files\Office folder is currently active and you want to go to the \Program Files\Adobe folder, type:
CD ..\ADOBE

Another useful shortcut is the ability to drag folder names from Explorer into a DOS console window. Simply open the console and type the portion of the command up to the point where you would otherwise start typing the path. Locate the folder in Explorer and drag it into the DOS console window. The console will insert the path string at the cursor.

Note: If the directory you're attempting to move is ambiguous, you may receive either a Directory In Use error or Invalid Directory error. To make it work properly, add a few more characters to the string. For example, if CD P* generates an error, try CD PRO* to open the Program Files folder.

Get great Windows 2000 tips like these sent directly to your inbox!
If you would like to read more Windows 2000 tips, sign up for the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article and the TechMail. Send us an e-mail or post a comment below.

 

About Bill Detwiler

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

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