IT Employment

Consultants want higher pay, survey reveals

Check out all the results of our recent salary survey.

It’s no secret that jobs are plentiful in the IT industry. Even the coveted consulting gig has become easier to attain. And the demand for their skills and expertise makes it easier for consultants to negotiate high salaries.

According to a 2000 study of Compensation and Recruiting in Management Consulting by Kennedy Information Research Group, an experienced consultant moving up the ranks within the industry was assured a sizable jump no matter what his or her original salary. The study also found that compensation increased for consultants at all levels in 1999, with the partner compensation taking the biggest leap at 20 percent.

We wanted to learn about the salary issues that our own readers face. More than 220 TechRepublic members responded to our IT Consultant Salary Survey last month. We found that consultants are getting the pay raises they’re after, but they don’t necessarily think they’re being adequately compensated. Here are the results.

What's your current annual salary?
  • Less than $50,000—35 percent
  • $50,000-$74,000—27 percent
  • $75,000-$99,000—21 percent
  • $100,000-$149,000—13 percent
  • $150,000-$199,000—3 percent
  • Over $200,000—1 percent

Does your firm offer profit sharing,bonuses, or stock options as part of its compensation package?
Responses were divided nearly evenly here. Fifty-one percent answered yes, while the remaining 49 percent said that they do not have these offered as part of their compensation package.

How consistent is your salary with that of your peers with the same experience?
  • Somewhat consistent—63 percent
  • Not consistent—24 percent
  • Very consistent—13 percent

Many TechRepublic members believe their contemporaries may be earning more than them. Nearly two-thirds said their salaries are only somewhat consistent with those of their peers.

How often do you receive significant salary increases?
  • Annually—57 percent
  • Rarely—19 percent
  • When I perform beyond normal expectations—11 percent
  • Semi-annually—10 percent
  • Never—3 percent

The majority of respondents said they receive a yearly pay increase, but a startlingly high number—nearly one-fifth—rarely do.

How satisfied are you with your current salary?
  • Somewhat satisfied—55 percent
  • Not satisfied—33 percent
  • Very satisfied—12 percent

Even though they’re receiving increases, many TechRepublic members feel those increases aren’t enough. Only 12 percent are happy with their compensation.
Are you earning what you think you’re worth? Are IT consultants as a whole making what they deserve? To share your opinion, post a comment or send us a note.
It’s no secret that jobs are plentiful in the IT industry. Even the coveted consulting gig has become easier to attain. And the demand for their skills and expertise makes it easier for consultants to negotiate high salaries.

According to a 2000 study of Compensation and Recruiting in Management Consulting by Kennedy Information Research Group, an experienced consultant moving up the ranks within the industry was assured a sizable jump no matter what his or her original salary. The study also found that compensation increased for consultants at all levels in 1999, with the partner compensation taking the biggest leap at 20 percent.

We wanted to learn about the salary issues that our own readers face. More than 220 TechRepublic members responded to our IT Consultant Salary Survey last month. We found that consultants are getting the pay raises they’re after, but they don’t necessarily think they’re being adequately compensated. Here are the results.

What's your current annual salary?
  • Less than $50,000—35 percent
  • $50,000-$74,000—27 percent
  • $75,000-$99,000—21 percent
  • $100,000-$149,000—13 percent
  • $150,000-$199,000—3 percent
  • Over $200,000—1 percent

Does your firm offer profit sharing,bonuses, or stock options as part of its compensation package?
Responses were divided nearly evenly here. Fifty-one percent answered yes, while the remaining 49 percent said that they do not have these offered as part of their compensation package.

How consistent is your salary with that of your peers with the same experience?
  • Somewhat consistent—63 percent
  • Not consistent—24 percent
  • Very consistent—13 percent

Many TechRepublic members believe their contemporaries may be earning more than them. Nearly two-thirds said their salaries are only somewhat consistent with those of their peers.

How often do you receive significant salary increases?
  • Annually—57 percent
  • Rarely—19 percent
  • When I perform beyond normal expectations—11 percent
  • Semi-annually—10 percent
  • Never—3 percent

The majority of respondents said they receive a yearly pay increase, but a startlingly high number—nearly one-fifth—rarely do.

How satisfied are you with your current salary?
  • Somewhat satisfied—55 percent
  • Not satisfied—33 percent
  • Very satisfied—12 percent

Even though they’re receiving increases, many TechRepublic members feel those increases aren’t enough. Only 12 percent are happy with their compensation.
Are you earning what you think you’re worth? Are IT consultants as a whole making what they deserve? To share your opinion, post a comment or send us a note.
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