Software

Disable AutoCorrect's automatic capitalization in Word

Although Microsoft Word's features are often quite useful, sometimes you may find that a feature is superfluous to your task at hand. For instance, if you want to disable Word's automatic capitalization feature in AutoCorrect, this tip will show you how.

While Microsoft Word's automatic capitalization feature can come in handy at times, it can often become superfluous. For example, if you're entering columns separated by tabs, Word capitalizes the first word in each line by default.

However, you can disable this AutoCorrect feature. To turn off automatic capitalization, follow these steps:

  1. Go to Tools | AutoCorrect Options.
  2. On the AutoCorrect tab, deselect the Capitalize First Letter Of Sentences check box, and click OK.

You can also use this method to prevent Word from capitalizing the first letter entered in a table by deselecting the Capitalize First Letter Of Table Cells check box on the AutoCorrect tab.

By default, Word also capitalizes the first word following an abbreviation ending in a period—unless you've added that abbreviation to the AutoCorrect exceptions. For example, if your company's name includes Ltd., Word will automatically capitalize any word following the abbreviation.

To prevent this capitalization, you must add Ltd. to the AutoCorrect Exceptions list. Follow these steps:

  1. Go to Tools | AutoCorrect Options.
  2. On the AutoCorrect tab, click the Exceptions button.
  3. Under the First Letter tab, enter Ltd. in the Don't Capitalize After text box, and click Add, and click OK twice.

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3 comments
CXY
CXY

It is a good feature to autocorrect name of days but, some words we do not recognize as name of days, like "cuma". Why it is always capitalize cuma? And how to disable this annoying feature without disableing the intended features?

proeme
proeme

AutoCorrect's automatic capitalization is just one of Microsoft's blessings one had better do without. If you use Word's English language version also for texts in other languages than English Word may very well turn out to be a minefield. I remember being driven mad by 'smart quotes', which made it impossible to spell Dutch correctly, and by i turning automatically into I (a nuisance in Slavic languages in which i means 'and'). Fortunately, these inconveniences could relatively easily be eliminated in the way described by Ms Richardson. But that was not the worst. For languages other than English you often have to rely on alternative keyboards available under Regional and Language Options in the Control Panel. In some of these, otherwise unavailable characters can be typed by means of key combinations involving Alt+Ctrl. But in doing this beware of typos, for you may get cruelly punished if the key combination used by mistake is one of the many key combinations for some command. Word is delivered to the public with a host of key combinations for all sorts of commands hardly any user would care to use. Sometimes there are as many as three key combinations for one and the same outlandish command. These really turn Word into a minefield. I still feel the horror of seeing the mouse turn into a fat minus sign that made the first menu item I clicked disappear for good. Such key combinations may be popular with programmers in Microsoft's kitchen, but Microsoft should think twice before presenting the general public with them. Every time I start using a new version of Word it takes me hours eliminate the obnoxious key combinations for commands in Tools ? Customize in order to get Word ready for use. Having to do that I feel like a guest in a restaurant who gets not only the ordered meal on his table but along with it the kitchen gear used for its preparation. When I thought I had finally mastered it all another hurdle turned up. With the introduction of the euro the makers of Word introduced the key combination Alt+Ctrl+e for the ? sign. This was not a good idea because it made many of Windows's own keyboards useless because this newly introduced combination overruled whatever Alt+Ctrl+e was supposed to give with whatever keyboard. For instance, with the keyboard 'United States-International' Alt+Ctrl+e is supposed to yield ?, but now it is ? what you get. The combination Alt+Ctrl+e fo the ? sign is nowhere to be found in Tools-Customize-Keyboard, so there is now way of eliminating it there. I had to ask Microsoft Support how to elimintate it. After all, it turned out to be simple: Insert-Symbol-choose ?-Shortcut Key. Henk Proeme - NL

TokyoPete
TokyoPete

It is always a joy to learn something new that had been bugging me for years.

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