CXO

Discussion: How can CIOs achieve IT goals despite shortages?

A recent Gartner survey identifies what business trends and IT priorities are keeping CIOs awake at night. Do the survey results reflect your opinion? And what can be done to combat these troubling trends? Join the discussion.


Recently, I received a press release about a Gartner survey that asked 1,500 CIOs across the world to identify what trends were affecting their businesses. Their answers were not surprising:
  • Economic trends, including cost pressures and demands for increased shareholder returns
  • Operating trends, such as the ever-present shortage of skilled IT workers and other resources
  • Market trends, which were identified as cost pressures, reduced product lifecycles, and the impact of the market on e-business.

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What was surprising to me was that those same CIOs also identified four IT management priorities that, in some ways, made me think that the CIOs were oblivious to the aforementioned trends. The CIOs listed the following as their top priorities:
  1. Provide leadership in linking Information Systems to the business strategy and provide guidance to the board/executive councils.
  2. Build capabilities by attracting and retaining quality people and nurturing and sustaining IS competencies.
  3. Demonstrate the value of IS through top-level program/project management, project prioritization, and developing the IS organization as a professional services business.
  4. Deliver e-business capabilities through e-enabling IT architectures and e-business process management capabilities.

Granted, these are good and worthy priorities, but I feel they are a bit obvious. In my opinion, it’s like identifying a tough opponent in an upcoming football game as the problem and then setting your priority as simply “win the game.” It looks fine on paper—but it doesn’t address how to beat that particular team.

How would you reach these goals?
This is where you, dear reader, can help. Surveys are great for identifying widespread problems, but when it comes to the nitty-gritty of getting it done…well, that takes dialogue.

I pose the question to you: How can IT make any of these goals a reality in light of the current economic and market conditions companies are facing?

We know the goal; now what’s the game plan?

Here’s your chance to brainstorm with your peers. Post your comments, questions, or even your challenges below. Be sure to subscribe to the discussion to receive regular updates in your inbox!
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