Linux

Do you prefer your Linux desktop to look and feel more like the Windows desktop?

8 comments
gkiefferjfk2
gkiefferjfk2

Started with Atari-ST [stock 512k] desktop [looks like windows xp, THEN had a 386 IBM COMPAT [Microsoft Win3.11] and loved that Desktop to a point but always installed another Win SYSTEM FRONT MENU LOADER that gave WIN 3.11 the look and feel of XP [only the start menu was at the top of the screen & you could have mutiple windows wide open & have associate file to programs setup's & when you closed it down It would remember the last pages you had opened... ALL on a WIN 3.11 machine. THEN I had WIN 95, 98, XP, VISTA... THEN UBUNTU V10.10 and the windows were SUPER [even better on the LINUX V10.10 machine and should have been what Microsoft Windows should be but someone forgot to make it happen. NOW they want to make LINUX GO KIDDIE STYLE with hugemulti flashing icons and video clicking to make it happen... LOOK... I'm 62 yrs old and I much rather keep LINUX in a FLAVOR that my old ATARI-ST, MICROSOFT XP, [including when I used to install the great FREEWARE program to be the WIN 3.11 SYSTEM FACE LOADER instead of WIN 3.11 default system face loader, VISTA & UBUNTU v10.10 looks & feel as I can easily find things... NOW ADD IN ALL THE SPLASH & DASH & EVERYTHING ELSE... Think what would things look & feel like if you want to sleep some wheres for 200 yrs and then woke up to find you have no idea where you are or how to get from POINT A to POINT B without asking some KID for directions. That's what they are doing to UBUNTU... THAT is why I would love for someone to start a OLD-TIME-UBUNTU-10.10-AB-1 [The B in there stands for BETA] [eventually that would be UBUNTU-10.10-A1] which would be a FLAVOR of a great OS with the desktop the same looks & feel from most of our computer experiance days with ATARI-ST [ATARI-STe], WIN95,98,XP,VISTA, UBUNTU V10.10 and earlier days & let the SPLASH & DASH go down to the KIDDIE level that It's heading to be.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

This just in: Christians dislike lions, by 2-1 margin. 60% of cavemen say fire 'Good!'.

Slayer_
Slayer_

page, it refuses to allow you to sort them newest first, it only shows them oldest first. So maybe that's why there are so many zombie topics lately.

jcoleman86033@gmail.com
jcoleman86033@gmail.com

Never really saw the point of having more than one way of doing things and windows had plenty - always thought it had a basically mediocre interface and it confused most end users. I've been using Windows since the DOS days and have been a computer teacher and a windows network administrator. Lately I've been trying out xUbuntu 12.04 LTS beta (xfce) and have been basically very satisfied - looks like a keeper so far. I've used Gnome over the years (mostly Mint LTS and Debian Ed) and while Gnome version 3 is OK, it was just OK. Xfce seems to be getting better, Thunar works better with samba and the whole menu system/layout is fairly simple and direct; maybe too simple/plain for some. That's the beauty in Linux - don't like xfce, try KDE, Gnome, Unity, Mate, Cinnamon, LMDE, Enlightenment, Fluxbox, etc. Find out what you like and how it's fits your work flow. I have access to Windows - XP & 7 and still have to use once in awhile; but my preference is Linux. I get fewer support questions from my wife also since she's been using Linux.

Ozkhar297
Ozkhar297

Linux is all about choice, now I am trying and feel pretty confortable using the "super" light desktop enviroment XFCE running on my Fedora 16 box

Slayer_
Slayer_

Only 25 responses. This is not a good sampling, TR should run this poll again. -Edit Oh, I just saw it says 2001.... That's just barely after the internet was invented :D

robo_dev
robo_dev

:) (x(x_(X_x(O_o)x_x)_X)x)

braunmax
braunmax

Linux is about choices, and yes migration to a choice of Linux would be eased by such a closer "feel", at least to the "classic" desktop. But I want the wider choice, for example HUD on Ubuntu is sounding interesting... KDE was my earlier "comfort landing spot" when I interacted with Linux.

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