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Follow these tips to boost Vista performance

Vista can be a performance hog, but there are many ways you can tweak the OS components to speed it up. See what actions you can take to remove bottlenecks and optimize Vista.

This article is also available as a PDF download.

Windows Vista is packed with cool eye candy, handy new features, and improved security. But all this comes at a price -- and many new Vista users are paying that price in the form of decreased performance as compared to Windows XP. Performance issues are the most common complaint I hear from readers who've just installed Vista or bought a new Vista machine, and my own experience shows that the concerns are valid.

Vista Ultimate runs great on my primary desktop computer, a fast Dell XPS with 4 GB of RAM. No noticeable performance problems there. So I expected the same when I bought a new laptop. I loved my little Sony TX model with XP, so I looked to replace it with an almost identical model running Vista Business Edition. It came with 1 GB of RAM (the XP machine has 512 MB), which I thought would be enough. However, I noticed from the beginning that the new computer took minutes to boot up instead of seconds, and running more than a couple of applications at a time slowed things down to an unacceptable level. Running Vista became the    hurry up and wait    experience that I'd heard about from other users.

I bought another 512 MB of RAM for it, maxing out its memory capacity, and got a 4GB USB drive optimized for ReadyBoost. All that helped some, but it was still significantly slower than its XP counterpart.

That's when I went looking for more ways to improve the performance of my laptop. Here's a look at some of the things that worked -- and some that didn't.

Turn off the bling

One obvious way to make Vista run more like XP is to, well, make Vista more like XP. Turning off the fancy Aero interface, turning off the sidebar, and otherwise disabling the features that make Vista look and feel unique will help speed up performance. But for most of us, that's not exactly the solution we were looking for.

Identify your bottlenecks

The first step in fixing a problem is to find out exactly what's broken. Vista includes a number of tools that help you pinpoint the cause of performance problems.

Performance Monitor

Vista, like its business-oriented predecessors (XP Professional, Windows 2000, and NT Workstation), includes a performance monitoring tool that allows you to do detailed monitoring of various counters relating to both software and hardware components.

You'll find the tool under a new name, Reliability And Performance Monitor, on the Administrative Tools menu in Control Panel. Figure A shows the Performance Monitor, monitoring % Processor Time and Memory Pages/Second.

Figure A

You can use the Performance Monitor to assess performance of almost any component in the computer.

The Performance Monitor is a great tool for IT pros, but it may be a bit daunting for the average user. Luckily, Vista has a simpler way for you to know, at a glance, which of your hardware components may be bottlenecks when it comes to running Aero.

Performance Information And Tools

A new feature in Vista is the Performance Information And Tools control panel, which analyzes your computer's hardware components and assigns a rating known as the Windows Experience Index (WEI) score. Your processor, RAM, graphics capabilities (separately rated for Aero and for gaming/3D), and primary hard disk are each rated individually. The lowest score determines your overall WEI score.

Possible scores range from 1.0 to 5.9. Generally, a computer needs a base WEI of 3.0 or better to satisfactorily run Aero and other advanced features. To find out your WEI, click Start | Control Panel | Performance Information And Tools.

Running this tool showed me why using Vista on my laptop was such a different experience from using it on my desktop. As shown in Figure B and Figure C, the desktop machine's hardware rated a 5.1, whereas the laptop scored a measly 2.0.

Figure B

A high WEI score, such as that of my Dell XPS, results in a good Vista Aero experience.

Figure C

A score under 3.0, such as that of my Sony laptop, is likely to result in a poor Aero experience.

As you can see, the RAM scores fine now, with 1.5 GB of memory, and the hard disk isn't the problem, either. Even the processor is close to the 3.0 threshold. But the graphics adapter in the laptop is not up to the task of running Aero.

That leads me to this question: Why is Sony selling these systems with Vista Business installed if they won't run the interface properly? But that doesn't help with the immediate problem: How can I make this computer work acceptably and benefit from at least some of Vista's new features?

The Performance Information And Tools interface makes it easy for you to tweak several components that can affect Vista performance. These options are shown in the Tasks pane on the left side of the window, as you can see in Figure C. Some performance tweaks you can do from this interface include:

  • Managing startup programs to help Vista load more quickly
  • Adjusting visual effects to help Vista perform better if you have an inadequate video card
  • Adjusting other advanced settings that affect performance, such as processor allocation and paging file location and size
  • Adjusting indexing options to prevent indexing from using up too many resources and thus slowing other applications
  • Adjusting power settings to balance performance needs with energy conservation needs
  • Cleaning up the hard disk so Vista can access data stored there more quickly
  • Using advanced tools, such as the disk defragmenter, task manager, system information tool, event logs, and Reliability And Performance Monitor to diagnose performance problems and fix them

Manage startup programs

The more programs you have loading when the computer boots up, the longer it will take for the operating system to be ready to use. You can cut down on startup time by eliminating from startup those programs you don't really need to run every time you start the computer.

Clicking the Manage Startup Programs selection in Performance Information And Tools will open the Windows Defender Software Explorer, as shown in Figure D.

Figure D

You can manage Startup Programs from the Windows Defender Software Explorer.

You can scroll through the list to see all the programs that run at startup. The right pane displays a great deal of information about the selected program, including its filename, display name, description, publisher, digital signature information, startup value, path, file size, version number, the date it was installed, startup type (where it is designated to start up on boot -- for example, in the Current User settings in the registry), location, and whether the program shipped with the operating system.

Some programs can be removed or disabled by selecting the program in the left pane and clicking the Remove or Disable button in the bottom-right area of the window. Others will have these buttons grayed out. If the Remove and Disable buttons are unavailable, you'll need to remove the program from startup manually. This may involve removing it from the Startup folder, which you'll find on the Start | All Programs menu, as shown in Figure E.

Figure E

You can find the Startup folder in the All Programs menu.

You can also navigate to the Startup folder in the file system via Windows Explorer, as shown in Figure F.

Figure F

You can navigate to the Startup folder in Windows Explorer and remove programs.

To find the Startup folder in the file system, just right-click on it on the All Programs menu and click Open or go to the disk on which Vista is installed and navigate to Users\<your profile> or All Users\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\StartMenu\Programs\Startup.

You can remove programs from the folder by right-clicking and deleting. The programs here are shortcuts, so you will not affect the program itself. You can also find a list of startup programs in the System Information tool, as shown in Figure G.

Figure G

You can view a list of startup programs in the System Information tool.

To access the System Information tool, type msinfo32 in the Start Menu's Search/Run box or on the All Programs | Accessories | System Tools menu. This tool is for viewing the information only; you can't make changes to the startup programs here.

In some cases, you may have to edit the registry to prevent a program from loading at startup. The System Information tool will show you the location in the registry that needs to be edited.

Adjust visual effects settings

You may be able to speed up performance by adjusting the settings of Vista's visual effects, thus sacrificing some of the bling for increased performance. When you click this option in the Performance Tools And Information interface, the User Account Control dialog box will display, requiring you to enter administrative credentials. If you're already logged on as an administrator, you'll be prompted to approve continuing. This opens the Performance Options dialog box, shown in Figure H.

Figure H

You can adjust settings via the Performance Options dialog box.

You can also access the Performance Options dialog box from the Control Panel | System | Advanced System Settings | Settings button in the Performance section.

Either way, on the Visual Effects tab, you have four choices:

  • Let Windows choose the best settings for your computer
  • Adjust for best appearance
  • Adjust for best performance
  • Create custom settings, choosing to turn on or off whichever visual effects you want

The more visual effects you have turned on, the more the hit on performance. If you choose the option to adjust for best performance, all of the visual effects will be disabled. You may want to turn off those effects that are purely aesthetic, such as transparent glass and fading or sliding menus, while leaving on those that are more functional, such as showing thumbnails instead of icons.

Adjusting other advanced settings

In the Performance Options dialog box, you can click the Advanced tab to adjust other settings that affect performance. In the top section, you can control processor scheduling, as shown in Figure I.

Figure I

On the Advanced tab of Performance Options, you can allocate processor use.

Here, you can adjust for best performance of applications or background services. For the most responsiveness, you'll want to adjust for best performance of applications.

In the second section, you can make changes to the paging file location and size that can improve performance. Click the Change button to display the Virtual Memory settings dialog box, shown in Figure J.

Figure J

You can change virtual memory settings for better performance.

By default, Windows automatically manages the paging file. If you deselect this check box, you can change the location of the paging file, spreading it out among multiple physical disks if you have them. This can speed access to paged data.

You can also increase the size of the paging file and/or make it static, so that instead of using the resources to increase and decrease the size, it always stays the same size. This can also slightly increase overall performance but will tie up more of your disk space. To set a static paging file, click the Custom Size button and enter the same number (file size in MB) in the Initial Size and Maximum Size fields.

Adjust indexing options

You can control what locations should be indexed by Vista's search engine. Indexing can take a lot of resources and put a drag on other running applications if you have a low-powered computer.

In the Performance Information And Tools dialog box, select Indexing Options in the left pane. Then, click the Modify button in the Indexing Options dialog box and click the Show All Locations button at the bottom of the Indexed Locations dialog box. Now you can individually select and deselect the locations to be indexed, as shown in Figure K.

Figure K

These options let you specify which locations to index.

Adjust power settings

Generally, using more power results in better performance. You can select the balance you prefer between saving energy and getting the highest performance by adjusting power plan settings.

Vista has three preconfigured power plans you can choose from, as shown in Figure L:

  • Balanced (gives equal weight to energy savings and performance)
  • Power Saver (sacrifices performance to save energy)
  • High Performance (sacrifices energy conservation for better performance)
  • Figure L

    You can select a power plan to balance performance against energy conservation.

    You can also create a custom power plan, by selecting Create A Power Plan in the left pane. You start with one of the three plan templates, adjust individual components using a wizard, and then save the plan.

    Disk cleanup and defragmentation

    You can use Vista's disk cleanup and defragmentation tools to remove unwanted files and to rearrange data on the disk so that files are not fragmented. Both of these actions will help increase disk access performance.

    You can open the Disk Cleanup tool from the Performance Information And Tools left tasks pane or from the All Programs | Accessories | System Tools menu.

    The Disk Cleanup tool allows you to select whether to clean up files from your own user profile only or the files of all users. When you select a specific drive to clean up, the tool will calculate how much space you will be able to free by running the cleanup, as shown in Figure M.

    Figure M

    Disk Cleanup can free up space on your disk, giving better performance.

    You can access the Disk Defragmentation tool from the Advanced Tools option in the left pane of the System Information And Tools console or from the All Programs | Accessories | System Tools menu.

    You can (and should) set the Disk Defragmenter to run on a regular basis, such as once per week. To avoid a performance hit, schedule the defragmenter to run at a time when you aren't normally using your computer. You can also do a manual defragmentation if you think it's necessary (for example, if you've spent the day uninstalling and installing programs, and the computer seems to be running slower). Just click the Defragment Now button, shown in Figure N.

    Figure N

    Defragmenting the disk regularly improves disk access performance.

    More ways to gather performance information

    The Advanced Tools section of the Performance Information And Tools utility gives you quick links to the following tools for gathering performance-related info:

    • Event log
    • Reliability And Performance Monitor
    • Task Manager
    • System Information
    • Performance Options
    • Disk Defragmenter
    • System Health Report

    Summary

    Vista can be a performance hog, but there are many ways you can tweak the OS components to speed it up. Microsoft has made it easy by consolidating many of these actions in the Performance Information And Tools console.

About

Debra Littlejohn Shinder, MCSE, MVP is a technology consultant, trainer, and writer who has authored a number of books on computer operating systems, networking, and security. Deb is a tech editor, developmental editor, and contributor to over 20 add...

42 comments
P_Faber
P_Faber

You say that you can change the location of the paging file - but not how to do it.

anthonymaw
anthonymaw

Vista is a resource hog. PERIOD. Compared to Windows XP, Vista creates twice as many background processes and uses three times as much RAM *just to boot up*. For the average user, these "features" are USELESS - they just wanna surf the 'net, type a letter, run a spreadsheet and read their e-mail!!!! The suggestion to "turn off the [Vista] bling" really suggests that you should be running Windows XP. Anthony Maw, Vancouver, Canada www.anthonymaw.com

bart001fr
bart001fr

Once you have the system up and running as you want it, the best thing you can do to improve your bootup times is to never shut down the system, but rather use the "Hibernate" or "Sleep" function of the system. To that end I use a gadget called "Control System with Clock" and close the system from there. Security is still available, because when the system is turned back on, you still have to enter your password to access your computer (unless you disable that, but why would you want to?). With "sleep", simply touching any key on the keyboard wakes up the computer and you're off and running even faster than from hibernation.

cyclops75201
cyclops75201

if anyone wants Vista to look like XP or Win98,by all means disable the visual features. As long as you arent running a legacy system and have at least 2 Gigs of RAM installed,there is NO reason you cant keep your Vista looking like Vista AND it run decent. RAM is very cheap these days so that shouldnt be a concern. Next,get a dedicated graphics card. Those 2 upgrades are all anyone needs to have a Vista-ran system without sacrificing the visuals that separate it from the rest. Second piece of advice?please by all means,learn more about your computer than where the power button is and what the IE icon does,the more you learn about your system the better off you will be and the more money you will save.. And NEVER go to a place like Wal-Mart,Geek Squad or some such place and take the person?s advice like it is Gospel,remember that no matter how much they know,they are SALESPEOPLE above anything. They will make you feel like you need their entire product line and services to make your system run good. In short,they are very knowledgeable,but if they can make a few extra bucks due to your ignorance,they will. No one is too old or too young to learn what makes thier systems tick.

mayres
mayres

there is one tip can improve your score Adjust your colour settings to 16 Bit instead of 32 bit i had sony laptop set this way and it improved the score from 3.1 to 3.5

putergurl
putergurl

I'm still amazed that the manufacturers have been releasing their systems with totally inadequate resources for Vista. The minimum memory requirements were just that, minimums. They've always done this to shave price points off their systems, but the spread has been much worse with Vista systems. Everyone seems to be willing to blame only MS for the performance of Vista, but the mass-manufacturers have really hobbled the OS with their trash entry level systems.

storm3d
storm3d

This is bullshit, Vista is f***ing rubbish from beginning. And we all know it.

ankuryadav21
ankuryadav21

i think these r common methods for each os.....n also vista provides this help n support with its package....

martiandon
martiandon

not simple enough for me I'm afraid

Sikosis-TheRealOne
Sikosis-TheRealOne

"Why is Sony selling these systems with Vista Business installed if they won't run the interface properly?" At least I'm not the only one thinking this. I bought a VGN-UX71 with Vista Home Premium on it and it runs like a dog. It doesn't help that they preload it with that stupid Norton AV Suite.

amj2010
amj2010

yes vista needs the FULL hardware, otherwise you wind up with unworkable piece of junk...

amj2010
amj2010

yes vista needs the FULL hardware, otherwise you wind up with unworkable piece of junk...

robert.johnson
robert.johnson

I did all this and then some. My new Vista laptop is still much slower than my old desktop clunker which is running XP, despite the fact the desktop is older and has a slower processor and disk. I asked for a free "downgrade" to XP but HP wouldn't give me one. I am stunk with a new clunker that won't run my old software anyway.

saved2serve
saved2serve

Even with tweaks Vista is appreciably slower than XP. I am running a new (thank God) 3 month old Dell e520, w/ 1.5GB ram and a 3.08 ghz cpu, and have tweaked Vista Basic (no Aero), as i also did for my other Windows OSes, 9x and XP, eliminating certain unneeded start up apps and Services, reducing Indexing (not in 9x), using classic menus and defragging, etc. But Vista still takes over a minute to boot up (from choosing the OS to loading all of the few start up programs) versus 35 secs for similarly tweaked and loaded XP on the same (dual booted) PC. And 60 secs for a loaded 98se on an old 650mhz PC. And XP is easily noticeably faster in performance as well, and does everything i need Vista to do and usually better. Vista is even slower than the old 98 in launching folders and system configuration options. Howeverm Vista does have more advanced text to voice than XP, and even voice to text capabilities, if you need them. I am still glad i have Vista, but i would not recommend upgrading to Vista from XP, unless you really have a problem with security (UAC is turned off in mine). I do not think it will be as long as it took for Vista for MS to comes up with another OS.

WorldBFree
WorldBFree

I have felt the pain of an unresponsive Windows (XP SP2) dual core 2.8 Ghz machine that task manager reports is 99% idle but the disk light is constantly on. After applying all the standard tweaks the thing still ran like a pig. Tried cranking up FileMon from Sysinterals and by the time the thing loaded whatever was happening 10 minutes ago when the thrashing started had long since gone. I suspected bad disk driver(s). Granted there wasn't a lot of memory in the machine but it was basically unusable (20 minutes to boot and start the browser). I wiped the hard drive and put Linux on and all the problems went away. The memory management is so much better on Linux . I suspect a big part of the problem is, as was mentioned earlier, that MS developers write their software on machines that have much more RAM than what most home or business users have and so don't see the performance degradation that is so common.

Fil0403
Fil0403

That's interesting, because, as I stated before here, I'm running Vista Business on a 3+ year old Toshiba Satellite A60-122 laptop with a P4 3.06 GHz, 1.2 RAM and 64 MB shared memory graphics and Vista runs smoothly (actually faster than XP did). I don't call a 747 an "unworkable piece of junk" just because I can't pilot it, but I understand not everyone uses the brain before talking.

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

Run XP on a 386 - what... it's slower than Windows 3.1 you say? - go figure....

Fil0403
Fil0403

That's interesting, because I have a 3+ year old Toshiba Satellite A60-122 laptop and Vista Business (tweaked) runs slightly faster than XP Home (tweaked) did on the same machine. Either way, if speed is your biggest and only concern, you might as well go back to Windows 95 with no security tools: it boots up in like 15 seconds and runs quite fast, but don't come complaining later that it's always crashing and/or you have to format your drive every month due to malware. It's a metter of choice and priorities. I value security over speed, maybe you and others do otherwise. I would (and do) recommend Vista to anyone, although I it's probably smart to wait for SP1 to be out (even though Vista SP0 > XP SP2). And yes, it won't be as long as it took for Vista for MS to come up with another OS, but that has nothing to do with Vista's quality (and it certainly has), but with a strategic change/push inside Microsoft to shorten their products' (and especially Windows) life-cycles.

davidlebar
davidlebar

I've heard the same complaining when XP came out and people upgraded from Windows 2000. The problem right now is that Vista is not truly designed for the hardware available right now. With all the enhancements put into the product for security and stability it will cause more CPU cycles and more demand for resources.

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

What is it with everybody? I installed Vista as a duel boot on my existing XP machine (3Ghz HT, 3 Gig Ram, 512MB ATI X1900) and it runs much faster than the XP installation. Both are on individual but identical (in make & type) disks. Not saying it is better but not slower.

Stevef
Stevef

I installed Vista business on my 9 month old PC and the performance was so abysmal that I took it off. I went through a similar process to Deb Shinder and it would still hang for 45 minutes, so I gave up the unequal struggle. What is the point of buying fast hardware and pairing it with an OS that makes it run like a ZX80 on Prozac? I shall stick with XP until I buy my next PC, by then we users should have sorted out the issues that Microsoft have been unable to. If you want a self-optimising OS, go for Linux.

PeterSS
PeterSS

You would think by now that Microsoft should be able to write an OS that optomises itself, to get the best out of the hardware. To carry out all this tweaking for one machine is OK, but to do it on a number of PCs (we have 7500!), even with tools is time-consuming. With 100s of man-years development in OSs over the years, why can't it optomise itself?

Thrilkill04
Thrilkill04

Also, Microsoft doesn't take into account that computer manufacturers are trying to make money, and they try to increase their profits by using less ram. Which then the computer barely(if at all) meets the minimum requirements. I have actually seen a compaq/hp laptop for sale with Vista on it, and only 512 of ram!!! Why would they make a computer that will barely(if at all) run Vista?

Stevef
Stevef

Wow you really do have an attitude don't you. I don't think that anyone who posts here is ignorant, even you, just because their experience is different to mine. I have many years experience fixing PCs for myself and my customers. My advice is the same as I gave when XP was released do not touch it with a bargepole until you buy a new PC. It's the same every time Microsoft upgrades any of their software, you need more ram, a faster processor, more hard disk space and a better graphics card. Also a few of the peripherals will stop working, because the manufacturers do not have NewOS compatible drivers ready. What really annoyed me about Vista was that it lied to me, it said that system idle was 99%, but nothing would work, so something must have been tying up my dual processors. I agree with several of the other posters that it is everyone's responsibility to protect themselves, there are a lot of nasty people out there. I don't trust Microsoft to do the job properly. I think that Vista is too complicated, the eye candy is a waste of processor power, just give me a simple OS that runs the applications I need at a respectable speed. It is also another example of Microsoft's mission to take over the world by bundling every piece of software they can think of in the OS.

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

1) LOOK FOR LIFE 2) LOOK AGAIN 3) Go to 1

saved2serve
saved2serve

I tried dual booting with 2 of the latest Linux distros, Ubuntu and PcLinuxOS - with the latter being faster than the former -but they were still slower than XP on this Dell e520. Also, Linux too often requires learning dos type commands to do many things Windows does by GUI, as Linux forums abundantly testify. But good concept, and i hope MS allegations that it violates numerous patents is not true.

robert.johnson
robert.johnson

Your reply did not make sense. I am not running Vista on a 386, I am running it on a brand new machine supposedly faster than my old one with XP. Doesn't your new machine with XP or Vista run a lot faster than your old 386 with Windows 3.1? My point is I prefer XP because it is faster and has more features. XP has more features than 3.1, so you expect it to consume more resources. My Vista doesn't even have the fax capability of my XP, yet it runs slower. Nor will it run a lot of software that ran on XP.

robert.johnson
robert.johnson

I think the point is that many who have switched to Vista would like to go back to XP, and for good reason. I think you know it is not possible to go back to Win95 since almost no current software or hardware will run on it. As for crashes, I have personally had more with Vista than XP. This could be a problem with Vista, or perhaps with the new PC, or with it not being quite tweaked all the way, who knows for sure. One thing is clear. For some reason Vista is much slower than XP on SOME machines but not others, and it is not yet clear why. Perhaps this is a default config that might work its way out eventually, we will see.

Fil0403
Fil0403

For the more skepticals (and there are lots of them when talking about a Microsoft product being anything other than a huge piece of bloatware junk), Vista faster than XP (on the same machine, of course) is possible due to features like ReadyBoost, ReadyDrive and Superfetch.

Thrilkill04
Thrilkill04

Vista may not be slower if it is on properly configured hardware, but most people do not have the money/know how to build/purchase a system. To the average user vista will seem slower, because they are buying it and running it on a PC that would be recommended for xp, but will barely run Vista. This is usually the problem, because I have helped a number of home users upgrade their "NEW" PCs to better run vista. Most of the desktops I see come with as little as 1GB ram, and they are using integrated video cards(which in all cases that I have seen eats up the ram). So yes vista is "Slower" on most packaged systems, because they tend to be grossly underpowered for the beast that is Vista. As a side note I would like to say that your rig is what most people would not buy in the stores, because they usually are on a tight budget.

SO.CAL Guy
SO.CAL Guy

i have to agree I'm not slowing down at all. in fact I'm running a lot faster. now to be truthful when I installed my security suite I slowed down but I knew what to do. I turned off windows defender' windows firewall' UAC' and windows security center'. as the software I use is much better and uses a lot of resources. but after that this system flys. and every time I install software like acrobat reader or something. I fire up autoruns and turn off all the crap they try and load at start up that does not need to start with the system. this system is only a year old but it's running well. and I did at ram to it. ram is so cheap now days I don't care what OS your running more ram is all ways better. and with vistas SuperFetch it is good to have more memory. and like I said memory is cheap now days.

Stevef
Stevef

You must have exactly the spec of PC that MS used to develop Vista. 3 gig of RAM isn't exactly common. What annoyed me most was task manager showing system idle at 99% and I couldn't even move the mouse, for 45 minutes.

maurice
maurice

I have been running Vista since final beta. No I din't put it on an off the shelf computer. You need to understand tht what you buy in the bib box stores is motly junk. Sure it may have the latest CPU and enough memory BUT it is what this is connect to that makes the difference. I have upgraded many of those machines with new motherboards and used the same CPU and gotten a performance increase of 50% plus in every case. These machines are built for price points not performance or reliability. So a nine month old box thatwas built for a price point won't be good Vista system. It was barely a good XP system. Older DELLs and HPs, etc. are not going to run Vista with good perforamnce or reliability. What these companies use to build these "toys" is the lowest of the low end and DELL is the worst of all of them. Go to a place where quality is more important than price and hae them build you a system and you'll get a system that first will be trouble free and it will be built to take advantage of the features of the operating system. And you probably won't have to throw it away in a year or two but be abble to upgrade it reasonably for whatever comes in the near future.

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

no...take 7500 of them - you have introduced the allowance for random PC settings. Bad Idea PeterSS, it's gonna blow!

Locrian_Lyric
Locrian_Lyric

can get that crazy glue off of your capslock key. have a nice day.

tor2351
tor2351

just shutting off all of the eye candy? The default is to let Windows manage what you see. I shut it all off and I am happier with it then I was with XP. It is not prettier, but what good is pretty.

NOW LEFT TR
NOW LEFT TR

Indeed I very much am! I would say a new system would come with at least 2GB these days!

ChrisEvans
ChrisEvans

My pc is much the same as yours but without the crossfire installation. I have no issues at all with my 5G iPod. It, and iTunes work perfectly with Vista and I am very happy with the performance. In addition I have 7 USB ports on my machine that are all full and all work perfectly so this may point to your machine / setup rather than Vista. Not a criticism of your post, more some troubleshooting info ;)

rickhal
rickhal

As a gaming enthusiast, I built my latest "geek" box with Vista in mind. Vista Ultimate. The box is a Thermaltake water cooled case (SLI power supply) ASUS deluxe mobo, E6600 dual core, 2gig DDR2 RAM, 1066 FSB, 2 ATI X1950 graphic processors in Crossfire mode (2 cards to one Monitor). I have no performance issues with Vista Ultimate running all the bells and whistles. Deb is very good, but most of what she is recommending is fairly pedestrian stuff. Defrag the disk weekly? Why? Unless you are installiing a ton of software on the hard drive with tons of data to be accesed constantly, it won't really help. Files won't be that fragmented. The fact is: MS has designed an O/S that needs beefier hardware than most people currently have at their disposal. Turning off the bells and whistles (Aero, side bar, etc.) will help. But, the bottom line is at this point one needs a fairly high end machine to run it with all that stuff. My problem with Vista remains the same: DRIVER issues. I cannot get it to recognize and use my Ipod. Which XP has no problems with. My installation of Vista seems to have issues with many USB devices. This is a typical MS screw up. One step forward...two steps back. If you are going to run Vista at this point in time..be prepared for the pain. And have a beefy machine (gaming rigs are the best right now) if you plan on running it with all the bells and whistles. That is the best way to have a decent Vista experience.

Stevef
Stevef

Anyone with a bit of sense can build a PC optimised to run Vista, but it is supposed to be a general purpose OS. Going from XP to Vista was like hitting a brick wall. At the moment it's all eye candy and no performance. PS When I put Vista on the PC it was barely 3 months old. My HP wouldn't even run it though the Vista advisor said that there were no problems. It's about time MS realized that most people are not prepared to buy new PCs just because they have a new piece of untested software to rip us off with. I stick by my guns, I will not use Vista until MS address the problems people in the real world are facing.