CXO

Four tools to help you prove IT's business value

Under pressure to prove your IT division's worth? Here are four tools for measuring IT's value to the organization.


IT is under fire: Companies want you to align with business goals and prove your worth by measurements.

But how do you prove the value of something as nebulous yet as integral to the modern workplace as electricity?

We’ve found four resources that will help you move your IT metrics into alignment with business measurements.

Why should you, you ask?
Applying business-oriented measurements to IT will help cultivate trust in your IT organization and prove its value, analysts say.

“The biggest barrier here is that IT organizations often don’t have a lot of credibility,” said Dean Davison, a META Group vice president of Service Management Strategies.

Davison contends that IT can change this by adopting metrics that focus on customer service and business value, rather than relying solely on measurements of efficiency.

In The IT Service Supply Chain, a free, nine-minute audio briefing, Davison elaborates on using business goals to measure your IT organization’s success.

Gartner has also identified “best practices” for convincing your CEO that IT is worth the investment. Gartner recommends CIOs commit to:
  • Measuring correctly and regularly.
  • Developing models to show IT’s value.
  • Using the models to identify issues.
  • Using the metrics in planning.
  • Improving and continuing to measure.

The complete article, "Five steps to measuring and managing IT return on investment," is available for free on TechRepublic.

For more detailed information on metrics and aligning IT with business, check out Cutter Consortium’s “Business—IT Alignment: A Methodology for IT Strategic Planning,” by senior consultant and former CIGNA CTO, Steve Andriole.

Andriole contends that business should drive technology, and if it doesn’t, that IT executives and managers should advocate a business model that does.

In this 315-page report, Andriole outlines steps IT can take to become more business-oriented, including tips on:
  • Measuring IT.
  • Better ways for companies to fund IT.
  • Standardization across the enterprise.
  • Organizing IT within the business.

Andriole’s report costs $2,300 and is available for purchase online.

Cutter also offers a more detailed analysis on collecting and using metrics. The 60-page “Expert Metrics Views,” priced at $75, is a collection of articles from IT Metrics Strategies. Topics covered include using metrics as a motivational tool and software-related metrics.
How does your organization measure IT? Do you think your executive management understands the value of IT? Share your thoughts in an e-mail or leave a post below.
IT is under fire: Companies want you to align with business goals and prove your worth by measurements.

But how do you prove the value of something as nebulous yet as integral to the modern workplace as electricity?

We’ve found four resources that will help you move your IT metrics into alignment with business measurements.

Why should you, you ask?
Applying business-oriented measurements to IT will help cultivate trust in your IT organization and prove its value, analysts say.

“The biggest barrier here is that IT organizations often don’t have a lot of credibility,” said Dean Davison, a META Group vice president of Service Management Strategies.

Davison contends that IT can change this by adopting metrics that focus on customer service and business value, rather than relying solely on measurements of efficiency.

In The IT Service Supply Chain, a free, nine-minute audio briefing, Davison elaborates on using business goals to measure your IT organization’s success.

Gartner has also identified “best practices” for convincing your CEO that IT is worth the investment. Gartner recommends CIOs commit to:
  • Measuring correctly and regularly.
  • Developing models to show IT’s value.
  • Using the models to identify issues.
  • Using the metrics in planning.
  • Improving and continuing to measure.

The complete article, "Five steps to measuring and managing IT return on investment," is available for free on TechRepublic.

For more detailed information on metrics and aligning IT with business, check out Cutter Consortium’s “Business—IT Alignment: A Methodology for IT Strategic Planning,” by senior consultant and former CIGNA CTO, Steve Andriole.

Andriole contends that business should drive technology, and if it doesn’t, that IT executives and managers should advocate a business model that does.

In this 315-page report, Andriole outlines steps IT can take to become more business-oriented, including tips on:
  • Measuring IT.
  • Better ways for companies to fund IT.
  • Standardization across the enterprise.
  • Organizing IT within the business.

Andriole’s report costs $2,300 and is available for purchase online.

Cutter also offers a more detailed analysis on collecting and using metrics. The 60-page “Expert Metrics Views,” priced at $75, is a collection of articles from IT Metrics Strategies. Topics covered include using metrics as a motivational tool and software-related metrics.
How does your organization measure IT? Do you think your executive management understands the value of IT? Share your thoughts in an e-mail or leave a post below.

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