Data Centers

From the Technical Q&A: Disaster recovery plans

How do you create a disaster recovery plan when you're responsible for the software applications but the responsibility for the hardware falls to someone else? Two TechRepublic members offered their advice in the Technical Q&A.


How should you go about developing a disaster recovery plan when you’re responsible for software applications but the hardware is the responsibility of somebody else?

TechRepublic member ITUUTENG recently asked that question in the IT Consultant Technical Q&A. For going to the trouble of answering this tricky question, there were 150 TechPoints up for grabs.

The 150TechPoints were awarded to two TechRepublic members, both of whom offered these excellent suggestions:

“In crafting a solution, you need to take into account the most likely scenarios: Earthquakes? Tornadoes? Floods? Wars?” Mars9 noted. “You also have to work with the business areas to identify what software and database applications support the critical areas, and what needs to be made available first.

“More to the point of your question,” Mars9 continued, “software needs hardware in order to function, so you will need to work closely with the person doing the hardware piece. You need to do your research, focusing on what must be provided in order to enable the business to function and to not lose important records and data, and continue to provide services to clients.”

TPHurley suggested that “a plan for annual testing is probably also a good idea, as changes to the software as time goes by may affect the ability of your application to run. You also need a plan to assure that version control is carried out on your software so that the backup software reflects the current configuration and can be verified.”

For more details on these suggestions, visit this post in the IT Consultant Technical Q&A.
TechRepublic is seeking IT consultants with intriguing stories. Have you identified a unique solution to a common problem? Maybe you have an opinion on a current IT issue? Send us a quick note, and we may contact you for an interview. If you appear among our featured members, you'll receive a cool TechRepublic polo shirt, not to mention accolades from your IT brethren.
How should you go about developing a disaster recovery plan when you’re responsible for software applications but the hardware is the responsibility of somebody else?

TechRepublic member ITUUTENG recently asked that question in the IT Consultant Technical Q&A. For going to the trouble of answering this tricky question, there were 150 TechPoints up for grabs.

The 150TechPoints were awarded to two TechRepublic members, both of whom offered these excellent suggestions:

“In crafting a solution, you need to take into account the most likely scenarios: Earthquakes? Tornadoes? Floods? Wars?” Mars9 noted. “You also have to work with the business areas to identify what software and database applications support the critical areas, and what needs to be made available first.

“More to the point of your question,” Mars9 continued, “software needs hardware in order to function, so you will need to work closely with the person doing the hardware piece. You need to do your research, focusing on what must be provided in order to enable the business to function and to not lose important records and data, and continue to provide services to clients.”

TPHurley suggested that “a plan for annual testing is probably also a good idea, as changes to the software as time goes by may affect the ability of your application to run. You also need a plan to assure that version control is carried out on your software so that the backup software reflects the current configuration and can be verified.”

For more details on these suggestions, visit this post in the IT Consultant Technical Q&A.
TechRepublic is seeking IT consultants with intriguing stories. Have you identified a unique solution to a common problem? Maybe you have an opinion on a current IT issue? Send us a quick note, and we may contact you for an interview. If you appear among our featured members, you'll receive a cool TechRepublic polo shirt, not to mention accolades from your IT brethren.

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