CXO

From the Technical Q&A: How do I get people to understand the feasibility of a project?

When a client is pushing for a project that's a poor idea, how do you convince her of that without looking like the bad guy? Three TechRepublic members offered their advice in the Technical Q&A.


What do you do when a client asks for the impossible? How do you demonstrate that a project is infeasible without alienating the client?

TechRepublic member Sumantranaik recently asked that question in the IT Consultant Technical Q&A. For going to the trouble of answering such a daunting question, there were 500 TechPoints up for grabs.

Sumantranaik posted this question in the Technology section of the Technical Q&A: “I am an IT consultant, and my main focus is on providing project consulting to companies. Most of the companies, especially so in India, just want to jump into IT because there’s a lot of money in it. In doing so, they do not realize the kind of work involved and the investment required. They come up with some fancy imaginative ideas without any base and expect to get outputs without understanding the feasibility of such projects. You cannot risk telling them that it’s not possible, as it is reflected upon you as incompetency. How do you tackle such people? What do I need and where do I begin?”

The 500TechPoints were awarded to three TechRepublic members, who had several suggestions on how Sumantranaik should manage the expectations of clients:
  • Wayne M. suggested developing a proposal of the cost, manpower, and schedule to do the project. “Also generate some estimates of cost and manpower if you reduce the scope of the project. Submit these even if they don’t meet what is specified in the request.”
  • Flan said there’s a difference between ”not possible“ and ”not feasible.” Besides telling the client what they want is not possible, you also need to tell them why, and in great detail.
  • Cedrick Choo recommended showing potential clients a feasible plan and letting them get other plans from other companies. “When they end up being burnt by other companies' not feasible plans, they will come back to you,” Cedrick wrote.

For more details on these suggestions, visit this post in the IT Consultant Technical Q&A.
TechRepublic is seeking IT consultants with intriguing stories. Have you identified a unique solution to a common problem? Maybe you have an opinion on a current IT issue? Send us a quick note and we may contact you for an interview. If you appear among our featured members, you'll receive a cool TechRepublic polo shirt, not to mention accolades from your IT brethren.
What do you do when a client asks for the impossible? How do you demonstrate that a project is infeasible without alienating the client?

TechRepublic member Sumantranaik recently asked that question in the IT Consultant Technical Q&A. For going to the trouble of answering such a daunting question, there were 500 TechPoints up for grabs.

Sumantranaik posted this question in the Technology section of the Technical Q&A: “I am an IT consultant, and my main focus is on providing project consulting to companies. Most of the companies, especially so in India, just want to jump into IT because there’s a lot of money in it. In doing so, they do not realize the kind of work involved and the investment required. They come up with some fancy imaginative ideas without any base and expect to get outputs without understanding the feasibility of such projects. You cannot risk telling them that it’s not possible, as it is reflected upon you as incompetency. How do you tackle such people? What do I need and where do I begin?”

The 500TechPoints were awarded to three TechRepublic members, who had several suggestions on how Sumantranaik should manage the expectations of clients:
  • Wayne M. suggested developing a proposal of the cost, manpower, and schedule to do the project. “Also generate some estimates of cost and manpower if you reduce the scope of the project. Submit these even if they don’t meet what is specified in the request.”
  • Flan said there’s a difference between ”not possible“ and ”not feasible.” Besides telling the client what they want is not possible, you also need to tell them why, and in great detail.
  • Cedrick Choo recommended showing potential clients a feasible plan and letting them get other plans from other companies. “When they end up being burnt by other companies' not feasible plans, they will come back to you,” Cedrick wrote.

For more details on these suggestions, visit this post in the IT Consultant Technical Q&A.
TechRepublic is seeking IT consultants with intriguing stories. Have you identified a unique solution to a common problem? Maybe you have an opinion on a current IT issue? Send us a quick note and we may contact you for an interview. If you appear among our featured members, you'll receive a cool TechRepublic polo shirt, not to mention accolades from your IT brethren.

Editor's Picks

Free Newsletters, In your Inbox