Tech & Work

Get guidance on subcontracting from TechRepublic

Subcontracting can be a great source of work for independent consultants, if you know how to make it work for you. Our three-part series on subcontracting can help you get the most from both hiring subcontractors and from taking on subcontracting work.


When contractors have a project that requires lots of time and resources, or if there is a specialty that a contractor needs but doesn’t possess, subcontractors will often be called in to help complete the job.

But how can you determine if you—as a contractor—need to hire a subcontractor?

How can you make your relationship with a subcontractor successful? And, if you take on work as a subcontractor, how can you make the best use of your time?

TechRepublic recently published a three-part series written by contributor Meredith Little that offers guidelines and advice to subcontractors and organizations that use them. Here’s a closer look:

In part one, “Need help on a project? Here’s advice on finding a good subcontractor,” Little gives tips on finding the right person or team for the job and how you should introduce a subcontractor into the client relationship.

Part two, “Use these guidelines to clearly establish your relationship with a subcontractor,” offers advice on putting together contracts and, for the prime contractor, establishing your relationship with the subcontractor. Included in this article are sections covering noncompete agreements, payment, indemnification, and terms of work.

In the final installment, “Tips for success as a subcontractor,” Little covers how subcontractors should approach their assignments and how they should position themselves within their client’s organization.

More Meredith
Meredith Little is an independent contractor who is also a regular contributor to TechRepublic. If you would like to suggest a topic for an article or ask her a question, e-mail us.

 

When contractors have a project that requires lots of time and resources, or if there is a specialty that a contractor needs but doesn’t possess, subcontractors will often be called in to help complete the job.

But how can you determine if you—as a contractor—need to hire a subcontractor?

How can you make your relationship with a subcontractor successful? And, if you take on work as a subcontractor, how can you make the best use of your time?

TechRepublic recently published a three-part series written by contributor Meredith Little that offers guidelines and advice to subcontractors and organizations that use them. Here’s a closer look:

In part one, “Need help on a project? Here’s advice on finding a good subcontractor,” Little gives tips on finding the right person or team for the job and how you should introduce a subcontractor into the client relationship.

Part two, “Use these guidelines to clearly establish your relationship with a subcontractor,” offers advice on putting together contracts and, for the prime contractor, establishing your relationship with the subcontractor. Included in this article are sections covering noncompete agreements, payment, indemnification, and terms of work.

In the final installment, “Tips for success as a subcontractor,” Little covers how subcontractors should approach their assignments and how they should position themselves within their client’s organization.

More Meredith
Meredith Little is an independent contractor who is also a regular contributor to TechRepublic. If you would like to suggest a topic for an article or ask her a question, e-mail us.

 

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