Microsoft

Get IT Done: Start command makes opening Win 95/98 apps and docs a snap

Open applications and documents in Windows 9x with the Start command to save time


If you’ve got network clients, you’ve probably got Windows—and chances are good that you are still working with Windows 95/98. In fact, 79 percent of respondents to a TechRepublic poll in January 2001 said they were still running Windows 95. While Microsoft may be discontinuing support for these systems, TechRepublic is not. Our Windows 95/98 TechMail contains valuable information that can save you both time and effort. Below, you'll find several examples of what this TechMail has to offer. Get tips on installation, troubleshooting, and much more, all delivered straight to your inbox—absolutely free. Sign up for the Windows 95/98 TechMail today!

Add the Start command to your batch files
If you use batch files to start applications for your users in order to maintain a common environment, you may find the Start.exe command a useful addition to your scripts. Using the Start command to run your applications gives you a way to ensure that applications are always started maximized or minimized when called from a batch file. Use the syntax:
start /max application.exe

or
start /m application.exe

to start the application maximized or minimized, respectively.

If you remember the TechMail tip that explained how to use the
explorer .

and
explorer ..

commands to open up an explorer window of the current or parent folder, you may not be too surprised to learn that
start .

and
start ..

do exactly the same things (though of course you can also use the /m and /max switches).

Use Start from the command line
By using the Start.exe command with the/w option, you force the batch command that has started the called application to wait until that application closes before processing the next command.

For instance, the commandstart
/w f:\customapp.exe

would start the application customapp and then halt until the customapp program had finished before carrying on with the next command in the batch file.

The /w optiongives you a very basic method of directing users through a series of steps—for instance, directing them to run a particular application once a week in their logon scripts.

Start documents from the command line
In addition to its other uses, Start will look up document extensions, such as .doc for Word or WordPad and .xls for Excel. For example,
Start /max f:\docs\staffmovements.doc

will start the staffmovements.doc document, maximized, using the application that is registered to start .doc files.

In addition, batch files can easily accept document names as variables. For example,
Start /max /w f:\docs\%1

provides a good method of calling a document open from a regularly run batch file. Simply add the document name as a variable after the name of the batch file.

Get great Windows 95/98 tips like these sent directly to your inbox
If you would like to read more Windows 95/98 tips, sign up for the Windows 95/98 TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article and the Windows 95/98 TechMail. Post a comment or send us a note.

 

If you’ve got network clients, you’ve probably got Windows—and chances are good that you are still working with Windows 95/98. In fact, 79 percent of respondents to a TechRepublic poll in January 2001 said they were still running Windows 95. While Microsoft may be discontinuing support for these systems, TechRepublic is not. Our Windows 95/98 TechMail contains valuable information that can save you both time and effort. Below, you'll find several examples of what this TechMail has to offer. Get tips on installation, troubleshooting, and much more, all delivered straight to your inbox—absolutely free. Sign up for the Windows 95/98 TechMail today!

Add the Start command to your batch files
If you use batch files to start applications for your users in order to maintain a common environment, you may find the Start.exe command a useful addition to your scripts. Using the Start command to run your applications gives you a way to ensure that applications are always started maximized or minimized when called from a batch file. Use the syntax:
start /max application.exe

or
start /m application.exe

to start the application maximized or minimized, respectively.

If you remember the TechMail tip that explained how to use the
explorer .

and
explorer ..

commands to open up an explorer window of the current or parent folder, you may not be too surprised to learn that
start .

and
start ..

do exactly the same things (though of course you can also use the /m and /max switches).

Use Start from the command line
By using the Start.exe command with the/w option, you force the batch command that has started the called application to wait until that application closes before processing the next command.

For instance, the commandstart
/w f:\customapp.exe

would start the application customapp and then halt until the customapp program had finished before carrying on with the next command in the batch file.

The /w optiongives you a very basic method of directing users through a series of steps—for instance, directing them to run a particular application once a week in their logon scripts.

Start documents from the command line
In addition to its other uses, Start will look up document extensions, such as .doc for Word or WordPad and .xls for Excel. For example,
Start /max f:\docs\staffmovements.doc

will start the staffmovements.doc document, maximized, using the application that is registered to start .doc files.

In addition, batch files can easily accept document names as variables. For example,
Start /max /w f:\docs\%1

provides a good method of calling a document open from a regularly run batch file. Simply add the document name as a variable after the name of the batch file.

Get great Windows 95/98 tips like these sent directly to your inbox
If you would like to read more Windows 95/98 tips, sign up for the Windows 95/98 TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article and the Windows 95/98 TechMail. Post a comment or send us a note.

 

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

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