Linux

Getting Linux inside: Tell us your story

Some network administrators have been resorting to covert installations in order to make Linux a part of their enterprise networks. Does this sound familiar? If so, we're interested in hearing your story.

As a network administrator, it’s your job to create solutions that make your network work—period. And with the plethora of choices you have today, it’s often necessary to mix and match operating system platforms and create a heterogeneous network to fulfill the needs of your organization.

The choice of a new generation
One of the OS options is Linux, a robust and stable operating system that has proven it can withstand the rigors of large network computing without killing your IT budget. Linux offers an amazing performance-to-price ratio when applied to almost all server needs: e-mail, firewall, Web, FTP, file and print, DNS, VPN, and DHCP.

However, Linux adoption often encounters certain institutional obstacles you won't find with other networking platforms. These obstacles include the attitude that “It can’t be good if it’s free” and the feeling that Linux tech support is inferior to established commercial operating systems. These arguments have kept administrators from adopting Linux even though it could save them thousands of dollars in up-front acquisition costs.

Through the backdoor
As a result of the adoption obstacles, an interesting phenomenon has emerged: Some IT professionals have been sneaking Linux into their data centers without official recognition from management. By covertly applying a Linux solution, many network administrators have solved certain stability and performance issues silently and soundly. Thus, Linux has been gradually and quietly invading the enterprise, and the enterprise is none the wiser.
Have you had to deploy Linux in a covert fashion? Send TechRepublic your story. Let everyone know how you managed to add a Linux solution to your data center—and whether your management team has come onboard to accept Linux. Note: If you’ve deployed Linux and were able to do it in the open (pun intended), let us know that too!

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

Editor's Picks