Malware

Have you read the latest on Sobig, whaling, and UNIX?

Get links to a variety of popular and useful TechRepublic articles from August 2003.

Between your near constant firefighting and the sheer speed at which the IT industry changes, you may miss out on important or interesting news and information. To wrap up the week and make sure you haven't missed anything, take a look at our recap of things you may have overlooked last week on TechRepublic and other sites.

The Sobig virus is only going to get bigger
The sixth son of Sobig is probably not going to be the last version of the virus to hit the Internet. According to News.com, security researchers believe that the creator of the Sobig mass-mailing computer virus won't stop with Sobig.F. That’s because virus creators may have found a way to cash in on their mischief.

Where do you stand on whaling?
As history proves with the devotion to things like Linux, OS/2 and the Amiga, IT professionals are a passionate and opinionated group when it comes to technology. In TechRepublic's Discussion Center, you'll quickly discover that same fervor extends to other things, like the resumption of whaling and the shuttle crash.

FBI arrests MSBlast worm suspect
An 18-year-old has been arrested after admitting to creating a variant of the MSBlast worm, according to the Associated Press and News.com.

Windows isn't the only target
Windows might be the whipping boy for the hacker community, but just because Windows gets most of the attention, it doesn't also mean that other operating systems are immune to attack. John McCormick points out some important vulnerabilities in FreeBSD and OpenBSD.

Read a chapter from Eric S. Raymond's new book
If you need to brush up on the fundamentals of UNIX programming, download chapter 19 of "The Art of UNIX Programming." TechRepublic and Builder.com are proud to offer members an advance look at this new book. In this chapter, Raymond looks at many of the principles taken for granted by developers today, which stem from proven UNIX practices.

If you can't stand the heat, stay out of the server room
Summer may be winding down, but your server room can overheat any time of the year. If the temperature goes too high, your equipment can quickly suffer heatstroke, potentially causing the loss of your job as well as data. Here are three ways temperature can make your system wilt.