Security

IBM Security takes us on a tour of the Dark Web

As the Dark Web becomes easier to access and use, cybercrime continues to rapidly grow.

You can buy almost anything you want on the Dark Web.

Executive Security Advisor of IBM Security Etay Maor navigates us through a Dark Web ecommerce site and explains how products are bought and sold.

Maor shows the site's homepage where there's a list of categories users can choose from to purchase products ranging from jewels and gold to drugs and weapons. The store includes services as well, such as a bomb threat service where the seller will call a school and make a threat in order to get a student out of taking a test.

SEE: How risk analytics can help your organization plug security holes (Tech Pro Research)

In this store alone, there are over 238,000 products and services available.

"We've actually seen a slight uptick in the number of people selling ransomware because it's in the news right now so people want to buy to make money off of it so people will sell it," Maor said.

All prices in the store are in Bitcoin.

Maor tells how easy the site is to use by explaining its search engine where users can sort products by different price ranges, or whether or not a product will ship to their country.

But how do cybercriminals know they can trust who they are purchasing from since everyone remains anonymous?

SEE: New World Hackers group claims responsibility for internet disruption (CBS News)

Maor shows where buyers can go to a seller's profile and see where people have left reviews and ratings about the seller so they can decide whether to trust them or not.

"This is why this economy is growing so rapidly. It's easy to access, you have reviews so you can buy with ease and you have people who will help you...in case something doesn't work. So the question for the cybercriminals is 'Why not do it?'"


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About Leah Brown

Leah Brown is the Associate Social Media Editor for TechRepublic. She manages and develops social strategies for TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research.

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