Instantly create Restore Points in Windows XP

The System Restore utility automatically creates a Restore Point if it senses a change to the system, or even some application, files. If you'd like to instantly create a Restore Point, read this Windows XP tip to find out how all it takes is two lines of VBScript.

Windows XP's System Restore utility continuously monitors your system looking for changes to the system files, and even some application files. This utility will automatically create a Restore Point if it senses a change.

If you wish to manually create a Restore Point, you can launch the System Restore utility by clicking Start | All Programs | Accessories | System Tools | System Restore and then following the steps in the wizard. You can simplify the launching process by copying the System Restore shortcut to your desktop, but you still have to walk through the wizard.

However, there's a great method for creating a Restore Point with just the click of your mouse. All you have to do is create a simple two line VBScript file that uses the WMI (Windows Management Instrumentation) moniker to access the SystemRestore class and create a Restore Point. Here's how:

  1. Launch Notepad.
  2. Type these two lines:
    Set IRP = getobject("winmgmts:\\.\root\default:Systemrestore")
    MYRP = IRP.createrestorepoint ("My Restore Point", 0, 100)
  3. Save the file as InstantRestorePoint.vbs.

Now, when you're ready to create an instant Restore Point, all you have to do is launch the script. When you do, System Restore will run in the background without displaying its interface, and it will create a restore point called My Restore Point.

Note: Keep in mind that in order to use this script, you must have Administrator privileges.

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Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

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