Processors

It's a 64-bit Vista Ferrari!

Over the Christmas holiday, Microsoft teamed up with AMD and sent out Acer Ferrari laptops and Velocity Micro media center desktops loaded with 64-bit version of Windows Vista Ultimate edition to bloggers all over the world. Here's what those bloggers learned.

By now, you've heard the scuttlebutt: Over the Christmas holiday, Microsoft teamed up with AMD and sent out Acer Ferrari laptops and Velocity Micro media center desktops loaded with 64-bit version of Windows Vista Ultimate edition to bloggers all over the world. Of course, the ether is now flooded with claims of bribery and payola by those who choose to view the acceptance of these systems as unethical behavior.

While I didn't receive one of these systems, I think that it's an awesome technology marketing scheme on Microsoft's part. However, I think that with all the hoopla about ethics, most folks seem to have missed the point--these systems are running a 64-bit version of Vista!

How many folks actually used the 64-bit edition of Windows XP? How many folks actually have computers with 64-bit processors that are fully capable of running the 64-bit version of Vista?

If Microsoft really wants to get the word out about the 64-bit version of the Windows Vista operating system, what better way to do that than to send a reviewer a really powerful computer with a 64-bit processor running the 64-bit version of Vista? If they just sent out the 64-bit version of Vista software, what would those people who only have computers with 32-bit processors do?

By receiving a fully loaded 64-bit system running the latest 64-bit operating system, these people will really be able to evaluate and write about the 64-bit experience. Isn't learning about Windows Vista's hardware requirements and the capabilities of Microsoft's most powerful operating system what most folks are interested in? I know that I am!

The 64-bit Windows Experience Index

I've written several articles over the past year about Windows Vista's hardware requirements and what used to be called the Windows System Performance Rating. (It's now called the Windows Experience Index.)

SoI was very glad to see that Scott Beale, who received one of the 64-bit Ferrari 1000s, posted several screen shots on his Web site of the System page that showed the computer's Windows Experience Index Rating.

At first I was surprised that such a beefy system--1.80 GHz AMD Turion 64 X2 (dual-core processor) with 1 GB of RAM and a 160GB SATA hard drive--only received a Windows Experience Index base score of 2.8. Before seeing the screen shot, I would have bet good money that a system like that would be closer to a 4.

The second screen shot shows the Windows Experience Index breakdown. As you can see, the breakdown shows that the beefy RAM, processor and hard disk combination all received subscores way above the 4 I would have wagered on. However, the Graphics subscore is only 2.8. This low subscore is due to the fact that the Ferrari 1000 comes with an ATI Radeon Xpress 1150 integrated 3D graphics system with 128MB of shared memory. This really highlights that fact that even with a beefy RAM, processor, and hard disk combination, a lower-end graphics system, can still bring the overall Windows Experience Index rating down--even with a 64-bit operating system.

Ed Bott, who received one of the 64-bit Ferrari 5000's, posted a screen shot of the Windows Experience Index breakdown from that particular computer on his site. As you can see, the Ferrari 5000 has a Windows Experience Index base score of 4.8. The subscores for the RAM, processor, and hard disk are very close to those of the Ferrari 1000; however, the subscore for the graphics system is 4.9. This high score is because the Ferrari 5000 comes with an ATI Mobility Radeon X1600 with 512 MB of memory--256 MB of dedicated GDDR3 VRAM, 256 MB of shared system memory. This indicates that a higher end graphics system can really bring the overall Windows Experience Index rating up to the subscore level of its breathren components.

Conclusion

Because Microsoft sent out those 64-bit Vista computers to people who would write about them, I learned something that I might not otherwise have known about. If you have comments or information to share about the 64-bit version of Windows Vista, the Windows Experience Index, or hardware requirements, please take a moment to drop by the Discussion area and let us hear.

About

Greg Shultz is a freelance Technical Writer. Previously, he has worked as Documentation Specialist in the software industry, a Technical Support Specialist in educational industry, and a Technical Journalist in the computer publishing industry.

34 comments
Tachyon
Tachyon

Send an Acer Ferrari my way.

intj-astral
intj-astral

No guarantee I will leave Vista on it, however(grin)...

perrine
perrine

I fail to see what purpose of this article. Is it about gorilla marketing tactics? Or maybe it is about the various ways IT people can determine that there is a difference between good, better, and best graphics (like we already didn't know this). Or, maybe this is about Windows Vista requiring high-end hardware for a better-than-good experience. Does this mean we all will need to trade in our junkers in order to experience the true benefits of a nature of this OS? "Conclusion"? Conclusion to what? You had to wait for a people to write about their experience with Windows Vista to determine that computers configured differently might also perform differently. Why wait? Go to Tom's Hardware next time or some other site with benchmark test results. It's no wonder why people don't buy into Microsoft operating systems and products when people have no other information about a product except to say It works better on a high-end computer. Come on...

jm
jm

The idea of this site, in general, is that if you mix real life stories with audience participation, you get much higher level of user engagement, more page views, and sell mroe ads. Note that a lot of people participate without having any real life stories to share -- they are compelled by the stories others have posted. As to this specific post, it is here to perpetuate that formula. There are any number of other places we might go to get objective info on things. Why not search the MS knowledge base for x64 driver issues? But for I.T. people, having a couple of good stories remains an effective way of maintaining ascendency in a fast-changing profession. Being able to say, "Yeah, MS sent out a bunch of x64 laptops to bloggers and they actually sucked" is definitely a good story. A fair number of people come here to fight or wave the flag, but that's the epitome of self-gratification... I don't care what OS/religion anyone belongs to, and the last time I checked, the crusades went out in the middle ages.

jm
jm

As far as I can tell, one of the more interesting thing about x64 Windows is the ability to prevent write access to the kernel on a hardware level. Evidently there are many software appplications and drivers that modify the kernel. This may be fine for others but personally I do not like the idea of my kernel being violated, so x64 sounds like a good thing. This feature prevents installation of a root kit, and would probably deter machine corruption by virus or spyware software. On the downside, it would probably do an even better job of preventing half baked drivers and eccentric third party antispyware and antivirus softare from being installed. (Remember the pop up ad, 'YOUR COMPUTER IS INFECTED WITH SPYWARE!!!'?) This is bad from a hobbyist perspective, but perhaps good from the perspective of someone who wants to run a large controlled environment, and for those maintain a computer for their mom/girlriend. Is anyone running this feature, and if so, any ability to get things working properly?

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

But I wouldn't buy a 5 site Volume License of it like I did for Vista 32 Bit as it lacks drivers and software to run on it. Currently I'm using it to test Exchange 2007 as that is a native 64 Bit application but it's not something that I would be incorporating in the near future. If you just want a very basic computer with no peripherals it may suit you but start to add things like printers, scanners and things like that and you've got to start to shop very carefully for suitable units that will work. [i]Actually that's with the 64 Bit XP the 64 Bit Vista is even worse when it comes to 64 Bit Drivers for hardware as the XP ones will not work on it like the 32 Bit ones do with the 32 Bit Vista.[/i] Col

shaliko1
shaliko1

I have been working with computer hardware and software since 1978. I started with Digital pdp8,1170,vax360,hp1000 and so forth,all had up grades from 8bit,16bit and 32bit programing languages. The component hard ware hasn't kept pace with providing its own processing and memory so that its compacity would be the same as its counter part the fast dual core processors have brought to the computer world today. Most systems are running in a compatability mode which in its self causes delayed system functioning. When the systems are provided with the right hardware components they will perform closer to what is expected by most hard core users, which in most cases are disapointed by all the hoopla given to new operating system, which cost more to begin with and security is still lagging behind to assist the business user and the home user will allways be the industries true problem. I feel that the focus should start looking at network control of the security features provided at a higher level instead of trying to cure something at the end user level with their information alway's being at risk no matter how many firewall's or spyware,spamware,system utilities ect ect that do nothing but cost money.

techrepublic
techrepublic

Agreed. New Technology needs to run current software. But the only way to innovate is by "tricking out" new harware first. Otherwise, it's not possible to create new software that runs on a system that doesn't exist, or isn't feasable.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

For 5 years it's taken M$ a very long time to even look as if they may be attempting to catch up with Technology. Yes I know that when the AMD 64 came out they gave away a Beta copy of XP 64 but it didn't work all that well and the 2 versions released since are little better. Although I'll now admit that if I needed a Media Centre Machine the 64 Bit Version of XP would surfice quite nicely just provided that I didn't attempt to attach a 32 Bit XP scanner or printer to it that I had previously and not specifically bought to run with a 64 Bit version of XP. Drivers are still a problem for XP in it's 64 Bit guise but at least the 32 Bit drivers work on most of the 32 Bit Vista installs but the 64 Bit ones that work perfectly OK with 64 Bit XP fail dismally with the 64 Bit version of Vista. M$ has a very long way to go yet before they convince the hardware makers to follow them down the 64 Bit road. Col

rhomp2002
rhomp2002

Don't have Vista yet but I do have 3 versions of Linux, 2 with 64-bit and 1 with 32-bit, as well as XP 32-bit. The only time I sign onto Windows is to watch and wmv video or to do double-sided printing. I have not figured out just how to do that right on Linux yet and Windows keeps the WMV 10 and above restricted. I am going to try the Wine and the other methods to emulate Windows next to see if that works. I keep a 32-bit Firefox and a 64-bit Firefox on my Linux areas so that I can watch the other videos. Whenever I do sign onto Windows, I run my anti-malware, crap cleaner and disk cleaner before and after just in case. Then I do what I have to and go right back to Linux. It is faster, just as clean and so much easier to update and keep working - and I have not turned off my PC in 2 weeks with no problems at all. As soon as I figure out how to do the last couple of things it will be bye bye M$ for me. I have a printer, flash drive, CD, Wifi and have had no problems hooking them up to Linux 64-bit at all. They just found the hardware, connected and it works. Why should I pay M$ for something that doesn't work when I have a system which does almost all the same things and does it faster and cheaper and works with the equipment I have very well?

esteban.aliverti
esteban.aliverti

If you want to play wmv files in your linux, try mplayer, it worked for me.

jackie40d
jackie40d

Any one whom buys this pile of stuff about "Vista" I got a bridge here in Arizona to sell you ! Its only got a few holes in it and kinda old and is only used on rainy days sometimes . . When are you people going to quit being sheep and being led around by the Bill Gates nose! Go to Linux central dot com and get Xandros Desktop Deluxe version 3 ( about 1/4 the price of MS stuff ) like $79.00 and go to Code Weavers dot com and get their Software ( $69.00 ) and then you can even run OLD windows games from a ga zillion years ago or the newist of windows stuff and have a much better system less hassles with fire wall and anti virus and Ad-ware stuff . . PLUS its been 64 bit since God was ! So this new stuff with windows being 64 bit is kinda behind the curve as per normal . .

Spiritusindomit
Spiritusindomit

I'd attempt to reply to this, but the lack of intelligent grammar is mindboggling. I wouldn't know where to begin with all the misplaced cliches, misspelled words and obvious lack of experience with anything outside of old linux distributions. I think you may need the kaopectate recommended by an above replier as your writing is far beyond constipated, and desperately wants to be the steaming pile of excrement it knows it can be. So rather than that, I'll say that winblows has Visual Studio 2008. Enough said. Now, take your 40ds down to the golden corral, I've heard god loves a nice assortment of rolls to go with a vapid mind.

tecgnull
tecgnull

Redhat Enterprise Linux, Redhat Desktop, Solaris, MacOS, Microsoft Windows all of these for their network capabillaties. Yet I am still in need of a grammer checker for my adventures with Linux/Unix. MS Office has it. So, Why can't Linux/Unix systems offer it as a functionality competiter for the Redmond Office's grammer checker. Xandos said to me once that they were going to send me their Enterprise System for free and they never did it. So, I am still pending on their dilivery from their word. WineHQ needs to create a better Windows Interface. One that is a RedmondVistaOS resizable.

techrepublic
techrepublic

I began programming on DOS. Most people don't remember it. Let me say this. Microsoft has been under attack from the day the developed an Operating System that costs money. Low-Level programmers are not able to manage the difficulties of programming, so they turn to virus manufacturing. It's strange that since it's the one OS they can't build a decent program for, they instead build a better virus. Hackers, are nothing more than angry inadequate programmers, and most of them converted to Linux to make themselves happy. Convoluted Logic is what it's called. 98, XP, and now Vista is designed to serve business needs, and it's not really designed for Games. However, Linux runs games extremely well. What does that say ?

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

[b]Dirty Operating System[/b] from a Sun programmer for peanuts re-badged it and sold it for a few Squllion $ and are still selling it. The entire thing was a reverse engineered poor copy of Inter Galactic Digital Research DOS Remember them? M$ only became the default Business platform because they conned so many third party software houses into writing code to run on their platform with the idea that as every IBM PC was being shipped with Microsoft Software these companies would be silly not to produce software for that platform as it would cost them money, and yes that also included the Games Makers. I also have to disagree with your idea that most of the [b]Script Kiddies[/b] use Linux after all if you are not using Windows how well do you know you Virus or other piece of Malicious Code is going to work? Also if these delinquents where in fact using Linus they would have first hand experience of how to break the Unix & Linux based machines which run the Web and most Financial Institutions around the world. To date this hasn't happened in a major way mainly because the Kernel, Programs & User Files are kept separated on different partitions something not possible with any Windows Platform yet. Though a Windows Vista Server GUI built on top of SCO's Unix might prove an interesting challenge to the same [b]Script Kiddies[/b] but because of the different ways that the different OS's work I wouldn't be holding my breath waiting for an exploit to occur and even them it's likely only to be a minor exploit. Do you remember the very first case of hacking that ever occurred? I do and it wasn't really hacking per say as someone foolishly allowed their Password to be used which allowed the few people in Melbourne Australis access to the Melbourne Universities Mainframe and then the rest of the worlds computers. At the same time that where given a copy of the Security Bible of the day because of the user rights that they had assigned themselves. All of this happened over 300 Baud Modems so there was such a high speed connection involved that they could do massive damage in a few minutes. Actually it took most several days to do as they liked and even then the companies adversely affected didn't do anything to stop these miscreants they just allowed them to play around and do as they please. At the time there where no laws against Hacking and no way to enforce any Laws that where introduced as they had no means of actually tracking the perps. Well they could backtrack it to Melbourne Uni but no further from there. Even when they eventually got the dial up connections they had no way of actually listening in to the traffic and it took a very long time to find out what was actually happening. In the very first cases the Feds here charged people for accessing the Uni's computer without Authorisation but as they couldn't prove what they where doing with the Computer they got off with very light fines generally nothing more than a slap on the wrist and don't do this again which was no deterrent. As I personally support & use both types of OS I also dispute your assertion that games play better on Linux. I'll agree that if they where written for Linux they will naturally work better but those ported to Windows don't work anywhere near as well on Linux as they do on Windows. The Graphics in things like [b]Need For Speed Hot Pursuit[/b] are now very good and are what chew up most of the processing power of the Windows Systems that they run on. Granted if they where written for Linux they would work better but stuffing an emulator in between the OS & Game limits the ability of the system to work as well as it could so from that prospective I would say it's the other way around Windows plays games better than Linux does at this point in time. Business on the other hand needs secure solid OS to work on that are reliable and there is yet not a single Windows Platform that meets these needs and then to add insult to injury M$ demands that costly CAL's or Terminal Service Licenses are purchased for any of their Server products which in most cases exceed to cost of the server product and in some cases the cost of the server as well. This doesn't happen with either Unix or Linux though I'm sure that SCO would love to implement it in their system to make more money for the failing company that they are. The only reason that 95 and then 98 where taken up by business so quickly and vastly was that it allowed them to get rid of the expensive well trained staff that they had previously and employ uneducated people to operate the computers. Back in those days it was an End Users Job to write a simple Macro or end the Financial Year in an Accounting Package not the job of an IT Specialist who had to drop their current work and do such demeaning work. Even then both 95 and 98 in all their versions where still running on a DOS Shell and where effectively nothing more than a GUI running on DOS, NT and it's offspring where a different kettle of fish but these where not heavily used by most business as they could do the same thing with 95 98 at half the cost to purchase and very little to keep working NT followed by 2000 was far more expensive and when XP came along Microsoft was selling both XP and 98 and 98 consistently outsold XP till it was dropped by M$ in an attempt to promote XP into the business environment with a Y2K Server applications and the expensive CAL's and Terminal Services Licenses. When this happened I started to hear mutterings about some different platforms that business could use and as M$ has gone along in their merry way those mutterings have grown in both volume and number to the stage where many business are now looking for a viable alternative to Windows and M$ products in general. But the Domestic Market is still embracing Windows and using it for all it's worth but as most of these are nothing more than Game Machines that collect a bit of E-Mail and do some On Line Banking with no AV programs in place and even less in the way of Spy Ware Protection after several peoples are sent broke because their home computers have been hacked and their Internet Banking details stolen I think even these people will start looking for something more secure rather than loose their homes and everything that they have worked so hard for. Once a couple of cases hit the media and they are nasty it will produce the need for change by either M$ or the Home User to something much more secure. I'm sure that M$ will solder on on the Games marker but once the movement away from M$ starts that will be the beginning of the end for them and it will accelerate exponentially as time goes by. Business will be the first to go another way and then most home users and all M$ will be left with is something like a glorified X Box. Col

Williamwallos
Williamwallos

I Wound up here Reserching Suse 64-bit.Im installing it shortly since im kinda fed up with all flavors of vista aswell as Xp64.as I read the comments and agreed with some of the things that are wrong with 64-bit windows I relised the were dated years ago.Vista behaves like xp did whe it was new. Vista is mostly stable out of the box but once you start updating to real drivers (if you can find them) instead of the genaric drivers Included with Vista, The system becomes unstable,hangs up,Blue screens,Very typical M$ .(its like hay $M you had 7 F$%*ing Years What this Horse S$i^).They Simpy Shouldent have released it yet BY THE WAY vist has a rating system 0-5 My lowest score is 4.7 My highest is 5.9 AMD-AM2-X2-4600+ Windsor(65w)2Gigs DDR2800 SATA-II in case anyone was thinking I might not have a enough system 4 Visa since released there are a list of about 20 cridical updates for a freash install ALSO "Vista certifide hardware" Soundgood right well i own a motherbord and videocard that are Vista certifide but most of the utilitys Wont runon a 64-bit platform .Xp64 is more stable but it seems to be the least supported version of windows ever Once i had to hurrase hp into giving my a beta driver for my hp deskjet 3900. also the first time i used it there were No wifi cards anywhere that supported 64bit. it had already been out for a few years please feel free to respond with your views (also dose the defrager in vist piss anyone els off the way you have so specific controle over what drive its going to scan or just view the fragmentation level the xp gui was ok i miss the 98 one but .No interface?are they tryin to dumb us down ?)

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

1 Little Bit. Kind of brings to mind Corel who have an industry leading package in their Draw product but it's hard to find any marketing material at all for it. In this industry the old Maxim of [b]Make It & The Customers Will Come[/b] certainly doesn't apply. :D Col

jm
jm

MS is not a technology innovator, and never have been. They acquire or copy technology. They generally make very slight improvements to the technology they copy in order to move the marketplace. The value they add to this business is their ability to package technology and make it relevent to large number of buyers, both consumers and businesses. Generally, the privilege of running the latest technology goes hand in hand with the disappointment of watching it be eclipsed by a process innovator like Microsoft. Microsoft's success has absolutely nothing to do with technical finesse. Most technical innovators do not have the business processes or skills in place to push their technologies out to a large market. And in many cases they are not particularly interested in doing so. Although he did invent the lightbulb, Thomas Edison was a terrible businessman, and his company's success had little to do with his business skills. As such, it will always be possible to find systems that are technically superior to Microsoft. The "discovery" of this or that technology that is superior is not really that interesting. But it will be hard to find systems that come from companies that have better marketing processes in place.

marketingtutor.
marketingtutor.

I must agree wholeheartedly, but take exception on one point. Microsoft's heavyweight status will slow the market share loss over time, and the change will not be as dramatic as you say. Especially considering the driver and software signing that will ensue. You will have those that go full throttle into the MS signing scheme, and those that reject it outright as a money-making racket. But if enough people (read: bloggers) make enough noise, MS will lessen or drop the cost of signing to prevent a mass exodus to other platforms. That is the name of the game. MS has a keen eye for watching public opinion and make very astute adjustments when bad press starts to truly affect the customer base. They mostly ignore non-affecting press.

sir_cheats_alot
sir_cheats_alot

First off: "Hackers, are nothing more than angry inadequate programmers,.." Please do not reffer to cyber criminals as "Hackers"; the proper name is "Cracker". real hackers do not associate themselves with them, nor do they intentionally break in to a system to do harm, but instead for the challenge of the attemp. see here: http://happyhacker.org/define.shtml Second: Linux doesn't run games all that well. this is due mostly because most all games are only ported to windows. Granted Linux does have a nice collection of games, but you can only find those in the repositories, and most aren't that good. as far as gaming goes for the most part the games people want to play are the ones found in stores(most of which are windows only). Before someone starts ranting about cedega(a premium version of wine,meaning you have to pay for it), i've tried it; and it doesn't work any better then WINE(which is free,mind you). in any case, people don't want to run their apps with emulation. so as long as the linux/mac gaming community is ignored by the maker's and publishers; windows is still the better choice for games(with very few exceptions Neverwinter nights would be one of those..a shame NWN2 went windows only..atari got greedy, and lost money because of it). For everything else however, Linux is just fine. I have been a linux user for about 2 years(im typing this under PClinuxOS, i don't care for this one, but Ubuntu, and its counter parts are nice) and im not going back to windows, but in the mean time i can't completely abandon it just yet either. not until game makers and publishers acknowledge the Linux, and Mac communities by making more games for ported cross platform.

DonSMau
DonSMau

Lets face it, mature Linux 64bit OSs continue to be hampered by the lack of drivers drivers so Windows has a lllooonnnggg way to go. If M$/AMD want to reach the tipping point faster, instead of giving away systems to bloggers, why not give away a 64bit version of Vista with every 32bit version sold (its not like M$ are going to _sell_ many 64bit Vistas)? It won't fix things overnight but I reckon that, by the time Vista's replcement comes along, the tipping point may very well be there. Personally, I'd buy a 64bit Vista tomorrow if it was effective.

jdpmep
jdpmep

well here it is. I use both windows and Linux ( and gasp I like them both) I use Mandrake redhat windows 98 2000 xp home and pro vista rc1 etc etc etc. and you know what I am not for or against either of them they both have very good and very bad points. and like it or not no matter how much you scream people will not leave windows for linux, at the most they will do as I have and learn and use both. I started M$ ( yes they deserve the dollar sign ) in 1985 used a dec then dos first windows was 3.0 on from there same with linux. Vista has its great points and yes it is very overpriced. My only hope is people reading this will consider reading about linux or download and burn a livecd to get the hang of it without commitment.

intj-astral
intj-astral

I still use Suse Linux and I would recommend trying it at least for the mere fact that it is a thought-provoking experience. Both systems have their strengths. Linux is strong at being reliable, consistent, secure, and versatile; Windows is good at being a victim. Bullies like viruses, trojans, and other malware riff-raff need a chew toy like Windows to keep them nice and strong; otherwise, what would become of them? Wicked impish humor aside, I still use Windows for games, though in the end it will be mostly Linux. Why? I got burned by Microsoft one !!@#$% time too many...

jdpmep
jdpmep

Open office 2.0.? very very good I use it in windows instead of Microsoft office @ $200+++ because I need the extra money to buy ram for the windows ram hog -- lol AB word is also very good as well. ps I truly wish windows wasn't such a resource hog with ram processor etc etc pagefile it goes on and on.

lastchip
lastchip

Have you not heard of Open Office? It is an office suite very similar to MS Office and documents can be saved in the office (doc) format to be transmitted to MS Office users. If you're not into Linux yet, Open Office has been ported to Windows, so you can try it out in whatever version of Windows you're using. There is very little difference for normal usage between the two and of course; it's free! Almost all popular distributions of Linux come with Open Office and many other applications, which make the loading of a Linux distro, a ready to use machine. If you are used to Windows and want to try Linux with the minimum of learning, try Kubuntu or Xandros. SuSE is another excellent distro, but more suited to business use.

Gautam
Gautam

A quick question on Linux : How do you manage regular Office suite requirements on Linux - is there someone developing a decent suite of a spreadsheet, and document editor, and some presentation SW for Linux world ? If so, please do let me know - The virus attacks in MS Windows have made my patience run out ... sigh...

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Of vista I'm not overly happy with it, There are just not the drivers available that are necessary to run a 64 Bit Windows System yet and there have been 64 Bit Windows Systems around for a very long time now. Things like Printer Drivers are one of the first that come to mind with many printer makers not supplying or even having available 64 Bit Drivers. At the same time that I've been having a less than satisfactory time with the 64 Bit Version of Windows in both XP, 2003 and Vista, I've been running several different versions of 64 Bit Linux without a problem and I don't have an upper limit of available CPU's available like the Windows versions do. I've been running or more correctly testing these systems on a Pentium Extreme a Dual Core with HTT and a Dual Xeon with 2 Dual Core CPU's and Windows just is at present unable to take full advantage of the available CPU's while the different Nix's that I've been using work flawlessly. From what I see M$ still has a long way to go before they reach the usability of the current Different Distro's of NIX currently available not to mention the new versions that are on the way. Col

lastchip
lastchip

I have a multi-boot 64 bit machine that runs (amongst others) Vista, SuSE and Kubuntu (all 64 bit). I have to tell you, Vista is by far the worst performer of those three and if I had to choose an overall winner, Kubuntu just eases out SuSE by the narrowest of margins. In truth, Kubuntu's just a personal preference rather than anything solid when comparing with SuSE. Admittedly I only have Vista RC1, but to my mind, it's nowhere near prime time. Interestingly, those that I've spoken to that intend to go and buy Vista, are all opting for the 32 bit system to run on their 64 bit machines. What's the point of that? Other than perhaps, the availability of drivers for the 32 bit system!

marketingtutor.
marketingtutor.

The only 64-bit OS I have stuck with were the *Nix ones. I have yet to install a Windows 64-bit and feel pleased with it. I inevitably uninstalled and moved my windows back to 32-bit. However, my 64-bit *Nix experiences have been pleasing to say the least.

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

Are not the available Hardware Drivers available yet for any Windows 64 Bit OS and without the demand from the customers the hardware makers don't need to get off their collective A$$es and create the necessary drivers. In all honestly I bought a Volume License of Vista and I got the 32 Bit version because there just isn't enough software or Hardware support available yet for the 64 Bit version. Maybe in 2 - 3 years but then again I said the same thing about the 64 Bit version of XP and I'm still waiting to find something to load the two copies that MS gave me of that. Col

Rndmacts
Rndmacts

I am running XP on an Xeon Dual core and a new quad core machine with Vista installed on it. There are no problems encountered with liscensing or usage. The usual problem has to do with drivers and that situation exists for Linux as well, because it is the hardware manufacturer's responsibility to produce the driver, not the OS. Most manufacturers don't want to pay for signing of drivers which is a requirement of the 64 bit Vista which is more robust and has different security features than the 32 bit version. And using Linux may be getting more friendly but it is still like buying a front end loader without the bucket, there are just no competing applications for Linux that are available for Windows and even Mac OS. The developers of cool apps want to get paid for their work, not give it away to the free loaders of the world.

marketingtutor.
marketingtutor.

Just exactly how does Hal's post make no sense? I am sure most people are thinking that about your post. Hal explained what he meant very clearly, and didn't leave any room for speculation as to what he was saying. Windows 64-bit left him wanting. Makes perfect sense. Making Sense?!? Your post is a load of stereotypical cliche run-on sentences, that even a 2nd grader could spot from a mile away. Are you a blogger by chance? Need some verbal kaopectate? Your real name must be Rip Van Winkie (purposely misspelled), as you seem to have been asleep for the last 20 years. When was the last time you installed and used Linux? There are plenty of applications for it, and many of them are anything BUT free! As for your analogy of the front end-loader, umm...it has quite a nice GUI and is pretty easy to use. Anyhow, everyone, please disregard Rndmacts future posts. They're not worth your professional time. Uninformed and over-opinionated!

HAL 9000
HAL 9000

At best it leaves a lot to be desired and at worst it's blatantly Illegal as to get the right to have a Digitally Singed M$ driver you promise not to support Cross Platform products. Vista is going to eventually take this one step further requiring all software that is installed on it to be Digitally Singed as well supposedly for Platform Security but the extras that come enclosed with the process leave a lot to be desired. As far as giving stuff away I'm not quite sure what planet you are on try getting a copy of Red Hat Enterprise without making any form of payment and see just how far you actually get. Even the Star Office only allows old versions to be released to the Open Source free to download community if you want the latest & greatest you pay for it. As for one company who I support who makes CG Images the software that they run is quite expensive and only runs on Linux there is no Open Source Product available to replace it with nor should there be as they make quite a lot on money from this piece of software. I think that you've fallen into the M$ trap of believing that because something is Open Source it's Free. Well unless you are only looking at Debian it's not the case and never has been. As for your assertion that you are running the 64 Bit version of XP on a Quad Core System just how many CPU's are shown in the Task Manager? As for the 64 Bit drivers for XP and 2003 where are they? More importantly why do I have to tell so many people who are using a 64 Bit M$ OS for the first time that they [b]Can Not[/b] install their printer or whatever onto the new system that they have just bought as an entire package? Please can you tell me for the average Business Desktop which application isn't available under SUSE Linux? After all we are predominately talking Business computers here so what isn't available on the Linux Platform that's available on a Windows Platform? More importantly just how long do you think programs like MYOB & Quick Books will last when M$ eventually gets their 2007 Accounting package to work? Currently it relies on SQL 2005 which isn't Vista compatible but by the end of January this year that may change. Col