Software

Pop Quiz Solution: Forwarding e-mail to an Internet account

Thanks to everyone who submitted a solution to this pop quiz challenge. We awarded a $25 Fatbrain gift certificate to one lucky reader.


Thanks to TechRepublic passport owner Jerry Loiselle for submitting the topic for this week’s pop quiz. Several TechRepublic readers submitted the correct solution, so we put those names in a hat and selected one name at random.
Our congratulations and a $25 gift certificate to Fatbrain go to TechRepublic passport owner and information systems consultant Sean Evans, who works in Arlington, VA.
The situation:
Here's the situation Jerry described: "A user wants to have e-mail forwarded to a Web e-mail account while he's away on vacation."

The challenge:
Jerry wants to know: "How is this done? Is it done on the Outlook 98 client? Is it done via Exchange Administrator program?"

The Exchange Server solution:
I checked with TechRepublic’s Exchange gurus John Day and Dom Bosco, and the approach they like best is to set up a second account for the road warrior who needs to retrieve e-mail from an Internet account. Several TechRepublic readers suggested pretty much the same thing. We put all of those names in a hat and chose our winner at random. Here’s what Sean wrote: “Set up the second e-mail account through the Exchange Administrator as a Custom Recipient. You specify the alternate ‘foreign’ address. Under Mailbox Properties, use the delivery options to specify the alternate recipient for delivering the mail. The mail can be delivered to both the original mailbox and the alternate or just the alternate. We have 170 employees and at least 125 of them forward their mail.”

On the Outlook 98 client side
TechRepublic passport owner Terri Forslof wrote with the same suggestion that many of you offered: Just set up a mail rule on the Outlook 98 client. You open the Tools menu, select the Rules Wizard, and add a rule that automatically forwards messages addressed to you (or where you’re carbon-copied). Terri wrote, “Type in the SMTP address you wish to forward to, and be sure and change the method from Standard to Leave message intact.”

Other solutions
For those of you who don’t use Outlook or Exchange, here’s a suggestion from passport owner Jason T. Eslick: “Check out WebMail. It is run on your site with your mail system.”

Steve Begley posted this suggestion: “I'm not sure about the backend part of the process in your system, but when I'm remote, I've used a product called Visto (http://www.visto.com) to retrieve my e-mail remotely. They can retrieve POP3 mail. You need to know the POP3 server name, the user name, and password. They walk you through the setup process. What is nice about this service compared to other Internet e-mail programs is that I also use Visto to sync my Outlook address book, calendar, bookmarks, and files. (They also have a product called Vogo that will convert the address book and calendar to speech so I can get my phone numbers, appointments, or e-mail from any phone. I know there are other services like this, but this works pretty good and is free. I had a bit of trouble with the downloaded sync software, but the CD version (which they sent for free) worked fine.”
To share your thoughts about this quiz solution, please post a comment below. If you’d like to suggest a topic for our pop quiz, please send me a note. If we use your suggestion, we’ll send you a TechRepublic T-shirt.
Thanks to TechRepublic passport owner Jerry Loiselle for submitting the topic for this week’s pop quiz. Several TechRepublic readers submitted the correct solution, so we put those names in a hat and selected one name at random.
Our congratulations and a $25 gift certificate to Fatbrain go to TechRepublic passport owner and information systems consultant Sean Evans, who works in Arlington, VA.
The situation:
Here's the situation Jerry described: "A user wants to have e-mail forwarded to a Web e-mail account while he's away on vacation."

The challenge:
Jerry wants to know: "How is this done? Is it done on the Outlook 98 client? Is it done via Exchange Administrator program?"

The Exchange Server solution:
I checked with TechRepublic’s Exchange gurus John Day and Dom Bosco, and the approach they like best is to set up a second account for the road warrior who needs to retrieve e-mail from an Internet account. Several TechRepublic readers suggested pretty much the same thing. We put all of those names in a hat and chose our winner at random. Here’s what Sean wrote: “Set up the second e-mail account through the Exchange Administrator as a Custom Recipient. You specify the alternate ‘foreign’ address. Under Mailbox Properties, use the delivery options to specify the alternate recipient for delivering the mail. The mail can be delivered to both the original mailbox and the alternate or just the alternate. We have 170 employees and at least 125 of them forward their mail.”

On the Outlook 98 client side
TechRepublic passport owner Terri Forslof wrote with the same suggestion that many of you offered: Just set up a mail rule on the Outlook 98 client. You open the Tools menu, select the Rules Wizard, and add a rule that automatically forwards messages addressed to you (or where you’re carbon-copied). Terri wrote, “Type in the SMTP address you wish to forward to, and be sure and change the method from Standard to Leave message intact.”

Other solutions
For those of you who don’t use Outlook or Exchange, here’s a suggestion from passport owner Jason T. Eslick: “Check out WebMail. It is run on your site with your mail system.”

Steve Begley posted this suggestion: “I'm not sure about the backend part of the process in your system, but when I'm remote, I've used a product called Visto (http://www.visto.com) to retrieve my e-mail remotely. They can retrieve POP3 mail. You need to know the POP3 server name, the user name, and password. They walk you through the setup process. What is nice about this service compared to other Internet e-mail programs is that I also use Visto to sync my Outlook address book, calendar, bookmarks, and files. (They also have a product called Vogo that will convert the address book and calendar to speech so I can get my phone numbers, appointments, or e-mail from any phone. I know there are other services like this, but this works pretty good and is free. I had a bit of trouble with the downloaded sync software, but the CD version (which they sent for free) worked fine.”
To share your thoughts about this quiz solution, please post a comment below. If you’d like to suggest a topic for our pop quiz, please send me a note. If we use your suggestion, we’ll send you a TechRepublic T-shirt.

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