CXO

Pop Quiz: Why does the Organization Chart change borders?

TechRepublic business manager <B>Carmen Barrett </B>submitted the topic for this week's quiz. If you can explain this bizarre behavior in PowerPoint, you could win a Fatbrain gift certificate worth $25.


TechRepublic business manager Carmen Barrett submitted the topic for this week’s quiz. If you know the answer, please submit your solutionno later than Friday, Feb. 25, 2000.
If you can answer Carmen’s question, you could win a $25 gift certificate to Fatbrain, one of TechRepublic’s e-commerce partners. If more than one person submits the correct solution, we’ll put those names in a hat and select the winner at random.
The situation:
I witnessed this behavior on Carmen’s machine and was able to replicate it on mine. Using PowerPoint 97, we created several slides using the org chart format. We set up charts for several different groups on separate slides.

When we reviewed the slides in PowerPoint, an interesting thing occurred—you’d look at a slide one minute and the border around the org chart entry (the name and job title) would be a solid line, like the one shown in Figure A.

Figure A
The border around this organization chart entry is a solid line, but it mysteriously changes to a broken line.


We’d scroll through a slide or two, and when we returned, the border around one of the org chart entries would change to a broken line. The broken line would appear on different entries, following no pattern that we could observe.

We printed a single slide, and when the print dialog box appeared, we changed the number of copies from 1 to 3. Interestingly, on two of the copies, all of the org chart borders were solid lines; on the third copy, one of the entries had a broken line!

The challenge:
If you or your users have experienced this problem and you think you know what’s causing it and how to resolve it, submit your answer no later than Friday, Feb. 25, 2000. If more than one person submits the correct solution, we’ll put the names in a hat and select a winner at random who will receive a $25 gift certificate to Fatbrain.
By submitting your answer, you agree to let TechRepublic publish your solution on its Web site. You also agree that TechRepublic may adapt and edit and authorize the adaptation and editing of each submission as it deems desirable. TechRepublic may or may not publish a submission at its sole discretion.
TechRepublic business manager Carmen Barrett submitted the topic for this week’s quiz. If you know the answer, please submit your solutionno later than Friday, Feb. 25, 2000.
If you can answer Carmen’s question, you could win a $25 gift certificate to Fatbrain, one of TechRepublic’s e-commerce partners. If more than one person submits the correct solution, we’ll put those names in a hat and select the winner at random.
The situation:
I witnessed this behavior on Carmen’s machine and was able to replicate it on mine. Using PowerPoint 97, we created several slides using the org chart format. We set up charts for several different groups on separate slides.

When we reviewed the slides in PowerPoint, an interesting thing occurred—you’d look at a slide one minute and the border around the org chart entry (the name and job title) would be a solid line, like the one shown in Figure A.

Figure A
The border around this organization chart entry is a solid line, but it mysteriously changes to a broken line.


We’d scroll through a slide or two, and when we returned, the border around one of the org chart entries would change to a broken line. The broken line would appear on different entries, following no pattern that we could observe.

We printed a single slide, and when the print dialog box appeared, we changed the number of copies from 1 to 3. Interestingly, on two of the copies, all of the org chart borders were solid lines; on the third copy, one of the entries had a broken line!

The challenge:
If you or your users have experienced this problem and you think you know what’s causing it and how to resolve it, submit your answer no later than Friday, Feb. 25, 2000. If more than one person submits the correct solution, we’ll put the names in a hat and select a winner at random who will receive a $25 gift certificate to Fatbrain.
By submitting your answer, you agree to let TechRepublic publish your solution on its Web site. You also agree that TechRepublic may adapt and edit and authorize the adaptation and editing of each submission as it deems desirable. TechRepublic may or may not publish a submission at its sole discretion.

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