Mobility

How to quickly send directions to your Android phone from your desktop

As if getting directions on your smartphone couldn't get any easier. Jack Wallen illustrates how Google has done just that.

Directions

Every once in a while, Google secretly releases a feature that, on the surface, may not have much of an impact on the majority of users, but it's so cool that you can't help but want to use it. I stumbled upon this feature last week when I was searching for directions to a location. With the help of Google Search, you can now very quickly send directions from your Android phone's current location to anywhere in the world... all from your desktop Chrome browser.

When you use this tool, you'll wonder why Google waited so long to launch it! Of course, you may be asking yourself, "Why not just get the directions directly on your phone?" Simple. Some people prefer typing on a standard keyboard. It's more efficient. With this new method, you simply:

  1. Open up Chrome
  2. Type send directions in the address bar
  3. In the new window, enter the end point where you see Where do you want to go? (Figure A)
  4. Click Send directions to my phone
  5. Unlock your phone and enjoy the directions

Figure A

Figure A

Sending directions to your phone couldn't be easier.

There is one caveat to this system─both your phone and Chrome must be associated with the same Google accounts (yours, presumably). So, if Chrome isn't signed into your Google account, Google will not be able to send the directions to your device.

When the directions arrive on your device, you'll see the destination location (Figure B). All you have to do is tap route to get the directions.

Figure B

Figure B

Driving to Daredevil's city, Hell's Kitchen, with the help of a Verizon-branded Nexus 6.

Google has one-upped themselves with regards to simplifying the act of getting driving directions on a smartphone. If you happen to be sitting at your desk and need to speed off to an unfamiliar destination, Send directions is the fastest route to getting there.

What do you think? Has Google made the process more efficient, or do you prefer tapping out addresses within the Google Maps app?

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About Jack Wallen

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website jackwallen.com.

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