IT Employment

Protect your own interests in your contracts

Check out Meredith Little's three-part series on protecting your own interests in your contracts. Learn about project scope and payment, specifying your status as an independent contractor, and what types of legalese you should include.

When you arrive on a client’s doorstep to begin a project, you need a firm idea of what you’re expected to accomplish.

That means having a detailed contract in place before the job begins. It also means including language that will protect you in a case of your client’s failure to pay, contract termination, legal action, and other scary stuff.

To help you survive these situations, we offer Meredith Little’s three-part series, “Make sure your contracts protect your interests,” which explains everything an independent contractor needs to know to avoid a disaster.

Part one, an examination of project scope and payment, explains why you need a written contract that outlines the scope of the work, the client’s responsibility, and the payment and terms.

In the second installment, Little discusses specifying the terms of the contract, how to spell out the legalese of your status as an independent contractor, and how to negotiate a “kill” fee if the company backs out before the job is completed.

A roundup of resources for building customized contracts is provided in part three, along with tips for developing a contract that can help shield the hiring firm from IRS penalties.
Meredith Little is a regular contributor to TechRepublic, as well as an independent contractor herself. Look for her upcoming article on how to turn down clients without looking bad or ruining your chances of winning future projects. If you’d like to suggest a topic for an article or ask her a question, e-mail us.
When you arrive on a client’s doorstep to begin a project, you need a firm idea of what you’re expected to accomplish.

That means having a detailed contract in place before the job begins. It also means including language that will protect you in a case of your client’s failure to pay, contract termination, legal action, and other scary stuff.

To help you survive these situations, we offer Meredith Little’s three-part series, “Make sure your contracts protect your interests,” which explains everything an independent contractor needs to know to avoid a disaster.

Part one, an examination of project scope and payment, explains why you need a written contract that outlines the scope of the work, the client’s responsibility, and the payment and terms.

In the second installment, Little discusses specifying the terms of the contract, how to spell out the legalese of your status as an independent contractor, and how to negotiate a “kill” fee if the company backs out before the job is completed.

A roundup of resources for building customized contracts is provided in part three, along with tips for developing a contract that can help shield the hiring firm from IRS penalties.
Meredith Little is a regular contributor to TechRepublic, as well as an independent contractor herself. Look for her upcoming article on how to turn down clients without looking bad or ruining your chances of winning future projects. If you’d like to suggest a topic for an article or ask her a question, e-mail us.
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