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Resources for teaching graphics classes

If you're a trainer who's daunted by the thought of teaching graphics classes or if you're just looking for resources to help get you started, look no further. Check out this compilation of popular articles that cover that very subject.


If you’re a trainer who’s trying to determine an appropriate method for teaching graphics classes, we’ve made your job a little easier through this compilation of popular TechRepublic articles.

The Adobe classroom
If you’re teaching novice users, you’re sure to find author Schoun Regan’s article “Learn using Adobe’s Classroom in aBook series” helpful.

You’ll find information on all of the familiar Adobe Software applications in this book series, which includes a CD-ROM.

In his article, Regan states that these books are designed for beginners. While the overall tone of the books won’t bog you down with techno-babble, the writers do use the proper terms when mentioning commands, something that is sure to be helpful when explaining shortcut instructions to an audience.

Graphics help for the chicken-hearted
If you’re feeling less than confident about instructing a graphics class, or just want to polish your technique, read “Don’t be afraid of teaching graphics classes.” This article makes the case that “even if you don’t consider yourself to be the most artistic type in the world, you can still give your students their money’s worth.”

In addition to the suggestion to use the tried-and-true three-Ts method—tell them, teach them, then tell them again—there are also tips for using a projector in a classroom environment and ways to encourage learning by giving your students good assignments.

Wild and crazy classroom
And finally, if you really want to get creative with teaching graphic design, read “Get wild and crazy with CoolText.com. ” This article reviews a site that is a must if you develop Web-based training since it comes complete with some of the hottest logos, bullets, and buttons to be found anywhere.

Best of all, there’s no need to worry about copyrights since this online service is totally free. According to the site’s creator, you’re welcome to use whatever you want without giving anyone but yourself the credit for your sure-to-be stunning work. Ah, the rewards of teaching!
Do you have any good graphics applications or resources to share with your fellow trainers? Let us know about them by sending us a note or posting a comment below.
If you’re a trainer who’s trying to determine an appropriate method for teaching graphics classes, we’ve made your job a little easier through this compilation of popular TechRepublic articles.

The Adobe classroom
If you’re teaching novice users, you’re sure to find author Schoun Regan’s article “Learn using Adobe’s Classroom in aBook series” helpful.

You’ll find information on all of the familiar Adobe Software applications in this book series, which includes a CD-ROM.

In his article, Regan states that these books are designed for beginners. While the overall tone of the books won’t bog you down with techno-babble, the writers do use the proper terms when mentioning commands, something that is sure to be helpful when explaining shortcut instructions to an audience.

Graphics help for the chicken-hearted
If you’re feeling less than confident about instructing a graphics class, or just want to polish your technique, read “Don’t be afraid of teaching graphics classes.” This article makes the case that “even if you don’t consider yourself to be the most artistic type in the world, you can still give your students their money’s worth.”

In addition to the suggestion to use the tried-and-true three-Ts method—tell them, teach them, then tell them again—there are also tips for using a projector in a classroom environment and ways to encourage learning by giving your students good assignments.

Wild and crazy classroom
And finally, if you really want to get creative with teaching graphic design, read “Get wild and crazy with CoolText.com. ” This article reviews a site that is a must if you develop Web-based training since it comes complete with some of the hottest logos, bullets, and buttons to be found anywhere.

Best of all, there’s no need to worry about copyrights since this online service is totally free. According to the site’s creator, you’re welcome to use whatever you want without giving anyone but yourself the credit for your sure-to-be stunning work. Ah, the rewards of teaching!
Do you have any good graphics applications or resources to share with your fellow trainers? Let us know about them by sending us a note or posting a comment below.

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