Enterprise Software

Salary links can help you increase your net worth

We could all use a salary bump. Yet, if you don't know what you're worth or what other IT pros with comparable skills are being paid, you may not have the information you need to negotiate an increase. These resources will help.


Salary. It motivates us to get up in the morning and make the familiar commute to work. Most of us need it and feel we deserve more.

But when you’re negotiating a pay increase or looking for higher pay at a new position, you need to know the facts about IT salaries.

According to authors Ronald L. Krannich and Caryl Rae Krannich in Dynamite Salary Negotiations, you’re cheating yourself if you are clueless about what you’re worth or what others in your field are paid.

TechRepublic can help. We’ve compiled a list of salary surveys from Web and print publications and government agencies. Follow these links for free information about IT salaries.

Executive salaries revealed
Computer Resellers Network (CRN) offers a wealth of salary information for the IT pro in the CRN Salary Survey center.

From expert commentary to hard salary figures, the Salary Survey center is a one-stop shop for most everything about salaries in the IT marketplace.

In CRN’s center you can:
  • ·        Determine which IT certifications generate the highest salaries.
  • ·        Search for average salaries based on job title, gender, or region.
  • ·        Use CRN’s Salary Calculator to find out how your salary compares with your peers.

For additional fun, CRN lists the salaries of Apple’s Steve Jobs, Dell’s Michael Dell, and other high-powered and highly paid CEOs in the CRN Executive Salary Survey.

What are you worth?
The RHI Consulting 2001 Salary Guide provides the latest IT salary and industry trend information for the United States and Canada.

Sponsored by IT recruitment firm RHI Consulting (RHIC), the guide includes:
  • ·        Employment recommendations from RHIC consultants.
  • ·        The big picture on the types of jobs IT candidates are seeking.
  • ·        Information regarding the dot-com shakeout and if it has dulled IT pros’ take on salary benefits vs. company stability.
  • ·        Insight into which skills and specialties are in demand in North America.

The guide also provides information about negotiating a higher salary, managing a compensation package, and current hiring trends by region.

Government statistics
The U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics’ (BLS) Web site contains more information about salaries and employment than you will ever need.

The expanse of information makes navigation somewhat difficult, but the site does provide salary and employment information not available on other sites.

The BLS site information includes current information on:
  • ·        Unemployment rates.
  • ·        The number of organizations committing layoffs.
  • ·        Employment numbers by industry and region.
  • ·        Industry career guides.

You can also use the BLS’ inflation calculator to make yourself feel better (or worse) about your current salary. For example, did you know that a current salary of $40,000 has the buying power of roughly $86,000 in 1980? Yes, I know it’s depressing.

Music to your ears
If you want more salary information, TechRepublic has an extensive list of salary surveys, free salary calculators, and other career tools you can download today. Click here to download the report.

Salary based on geography
The DataMasters’ 2001 Computer Industry Salary Survey is another wealth of IT salary information.

Sponsored by DataMasters, an organization that specializes in supporting information systems, the survey offers median salaries based on regions of the United States. DataMasters also divides the survey’s information between managerial and professional employment.

The survey provides:
  • ·        Salary figures based on peer-pay comparisons among IT pros.
  • ·        Salary categories based on geographic location and job title.
  • ·        Compensation figures for different geographical locations.

DataMasters also lists surveys from 1990 to the present so you can compare how IT salaries have changed during the last 12 years.

A year’s worth of information
The Real Rate Salary Survey from Real Rate is a site that supplements Janet Ruhl's The Computer Consultant's Workbook. The site offers consulting rate and salary analysis from information provided by IT pros who visit the site.

The survey lets visitors:
  • ·        Add their rate and salary information.
  • ·        Search the survey for information on different IT professions.

The Web site displays the most recent information submitted. You can download the complete Salary Survey Database for $25 if you want a look at the year’s submissions.

The download provides salary and rate based on the skills, location, or length of contract for those who submit their information.

Salary database
The ZDNet Salary Survey is a voluntary survey conducted annually that gives you a peek at how much IT pros are making and if they receive extra compensation for their work.

The survey also asks respondents if they are satisfied with what they’re paid. (Most respondents said they are not satisfied.)

You can use the salary survey to:
  • ·        Search for information about 18 different IT jobs.
  • ·        Discover what a person with a job similar to yours earns.
  • ·        Use factors like age or gender to search salary figures.
  • ·        Learn how much full- and part-time, contract, and freelance employees earn with the survey’s job status option.

How do you negotiate a pay raise?
What have you done to receive a bump in your salary? Tell us which strategy works for you. Or let us know what strategy didn’t result in the salary increase you thought you deserved. Drop us a line or start a discussion below.

 

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