Hardware

Save time by putting shut down and reboot on desktop shortcuts

We asked for your favorite timesaving tips, and TechRepublic passport owner <B>Faith Thaxton</B> responded with two desktop shortcuts that are sure to please.


Recently I asked you to send me your favorite desktop tips and tricks, and many of you jumped at the chance to show off a little. This week I’m proud to publish the tips submitted by TechRepublic passport owner Faith R. Thaxton. I installed these shortcuts on my desktop and now use them every day.

Have Faith in the shortcuts
Here’s what Faith wrote: “Maybe you've all heard of these, but here are a couple of shortcuts for those of us who no longer feel we have time to go through the four-step shut down and restart process.”

Shortcut to shut down
  • Create a new shortcut on your desktop (right-click on the desktop, select New and then Shortcut).
  • In the Command field, enter
    C:\WINDOWS\RUNDLL.EXE user.exe,exitwindows
  • Click Next, Next, and Finish to create the desktop shortcut. That's it!

You can use this shortcut to shut down your Windows 95/98 machine. (It will not work on computers running Windows NT. Sorry.)

Shortcut to restart
  • Create a new shortcut on your desktop.
  • This time, in the Command field, enter
    C:\WINDOWS\RUNDLL.EXE user.exe,exitwindowsexec
  • Click Next, Next, and Finish to create the desktop shortcut.

That's it! This shortcut may be used to restart your machine. (Once again, this tip will not work with Windows NT.) Figure A shows what the two shortcuts look like on the desktop. By the way, if you’re running a communications program when you try to shut down using this shortcut, you’ll probably see a warning like the one shown in Figure B. If you do, just exit your communications program and then use the desktop shortcut to shut down.

Figure A
Here’s what the shortcuts look like (assuming you name them shutdown and restart).


Figure B
You may see an alert like this one if you attempt to use the shortcut to shut down while your communication program is running.

If you’ve got a great timesaving tip you’d like to share with your fellow IT professionals, please send me a note , or post a comment below.
Recently I asked you to send me your favorite desktop tips and tricks, and many of you jumped at the chance to show off a little. This week I’m proud to publish the tips submitted by TechRepublic passport owner Faith R. Thaxton. I installed these shortcuts on my desktop and now use them every day.

Have Faith in the shortcuts
Here’s what Faith wrote: “Maybe you've all heard of these, but here are a couple of shortcuts for those of us who no longer feel we have time to go through the four-step shut down and restart process.”

Shortcut to shut down
  • Create a new shortcut on your desktop (right-click on the desktop, select New and then Shortcut).
  • In the Command field, enter
    C:\WINDOWS\RUNDLL.EXE user.exe,exitwindows
  • Click Next, Next, and Finish to create the desktop shortcut. That's it!

You can use this shortcut to shut down your Windows 95/98 machine. (It will not work on computers running Windows NT. Sorry.)

Shortcut to restart
  • Create a new shortcut on your desktop.
  • This time, in the Command field, enter
    C:\WINDOWS\RUNDLL.EXE user.exe,exitwindowsexec
  • Click Next, Next, and Finish to create the desktop shortcut.

That's it! This shortcut may be used to restart your machine. (Once again, this tip will not work with Windows NT.) Figure A shows what the two shortcuts look like on the desktop. By the way, if you’re running a communications program when you try to shut down using this shortcut, you’ll probably see a warning like the one shown in Figure B. If you do, just exit your communications program and then use the desktop shortcut to shut down.

Figure A
Here’s what the shortcuts look like (assuming you name them shutdown and restart).


Figure B
You may see an alert like this one if you attempt to use the shortcut to shut down while your communication program is running.

If you’ve got a great timesaving tip you’d like to share with your fellow IT professionals, please send me a note , or post a comment below.

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