Software

Step-By-Step: Convert blocks of text to a table

You can convert raw text or data to a table format in Word no matter what format it is in. This quick Step-By-Step trick shows you how.


Word's Text To Table feature lets users convert raw text or data to a table format. Most of the time, this feature is used to convert comma-delimited or tab-delimited text so that the resulting table has neatly organized columns and rows.

However, the text you convert to a table doesn't always have to be in a delimited or organized format. The Text To Table feature lets you wrap a table structure around just about any block of text. For instance, suppose you have a smattering of paragraphs and lines of both delimited and undelimited text and you want to put the whole lot into a table for formatting purposes. You don't have to do any copying and pasting. Just select all the text, go to Table | Convert | Text To Table, and click OK to accept the default settings for the number of columns and rows. Then go to Table | Draw Table and customize the table by adding or deleting cell borders with the table-drawing tools.
For instance, suppose you have a smattering of paragraphs and lines of both delimited and undelimited text and you want to put the whole lot into a table for formatting purposes. You don't have to do any copying and pasting.
Just select all the text, go to Table | Convert | Text To Table, and click OK to accept the default settings for the number of columns and rows.
Then go to Table | Draw Table and customize the table by adding or deleting cell borders with the table drawing tools.

Want to merge two cells? Click the Eraser button and mouse over the cell border. To split cells into new rows or columns, click the Draw Table tool and shape your table visually.

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