Networking

Survey results: Are you using a wireless LAN?

The results of our survey on wireless LAN use are in. Find out what members had to say about their use of wireless LANs and how they think they will use them in the future.


Industry analysts like Sprint and MCIworldcom are predicting that wireless data transfer will gain in popularity in the next few years, rivaling wireless voice by the year 2003. But we wanted to know what you think. So we recently asked our members to take a survey about their plans and concerns when it comes to wireless networking. We found that most of you aren’t using this new technology, but that once the price goes down, many of you will consider wireless LANs to be a promising alternative to laying countless miles of cable.

Are you using a wireless LAN at your company?
Two-thirds of those who responded to the survey said that they aren’t using a wireless LAN.



If you are using a wireless LAN, how are you putting it to work?
For the one-third who responded that they’re already using a wireless LAN, more than half of respondents (54 percent) are connecting mobile or roaming network users.

Perhaps more surprising is that more of you are using wireless to connect desktops with the network than are using it to avoid rewiring changing workspaces.



Which of the following benefits of a wireless LAN do you find most compelling?
In the survey, we listed a few of the more obvious potential benefits of a wireless LAN.

The big winners here were replacing wall cabling and freeing users to position devices where they want (32 percent), along with allowing mobile computing employees more flexibility in where they interact with the network (34 percent).



If you’re not using a wireless LAN now, why not?
We had already heard that slow connection speeds were a cause of concern, and a Gartner analyst predicted this would be solved by 2005, so it was little surprise to see this win out at 36 percent. Tied with speed was the cost of a wireless network.


TechRepublic thanks everyone who participated in this survey—and there were a lot of you who did. If you have more to say about this topic, post a comment below or send us a note.
Industry analysts like Sprint and MCIworldcom are predicting that wireless data transfer will gain in popularity in the next few years, rivaling wireless voice by the year 2003. But we wanted to know what you think. So we recently asked our members to take a survey about their plans and concerns when it comes to wireless networking. We found that most of you aren’t using this new technology, but that once the price goes down, many of you will consider wireless LANs to be a promising alternative to laying countless miles of cable.

Are you using a wireless LAN at your company?
Two-thirds of those who responded to the survey said that they aren’t using a wireless LAN.



If you are using a wireless LAN, how are you putting it to work?
For the one-third who responded that they’re already using a wireless LAN, more than half of respondents (54 percent) are connecting mobile or roaming network users.

Perhaps more surprising is that more of you are using wireless to connect desktops with the network than are using it to avoid rewiring changing workspaces.



Which of the following benefits of a wireless LAN do you find most compelling?
In the survey, we listed a few of the more obvious potential benefits of a wireless LAN.

The big winners here were replacing wall cabling and freeing users to position devices where they want (32 percent), along with allowing mobile computing employees more flexibility in where they interact with the network (34 percent).



If you’re not using a wireless LAN now, why not?
We had already heard that slow connection speeds were a cause of concern, and a Gartner analyst predicted this would be solved by 2005, so it was little surprise to see this win out at 36 percent. Tied with speed was the cost of a wireless network.


TechRepublic thanks everyone who participated in this survey—and there were a lot of you who did. If you have more to say about this topic, post a comment below or send us a note.

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