Security

Survey results: Bring on the biometrics

Biometric security processes, like confirming your identity with fingerprints or a retina scan, are likely to be well received, according to the TechRepublic members who took our survey. Take a look at the results to see if you think the majority rules.


Put away that classy fountain pen that cost you a small fortune. That’s right, your Mont Blanc should go in mothballs. It’s officially obsolete.

The Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act was signed into law earlier this summer. Now, with electronic signatures carrying the same weight as signed documents, corporate executives will begin to wonder why they ever had to sign a document in the first place.

We asked TechRepublic members what you thought about electronic signatures and the larger issue of biometric security processes.

Here is what you told us:

Appealing to customers
A majority of you thought biometrics would be well received or very well received by customers, to the combined tune of 61 percent.



Vendors provide a warm reception
A larger majority of you, 76 percent, thought vendors would appreciate the benefits of biometric security. It is easy to see that vendors have the most to lose due to lax security, so any security procedure is likely to be better received by this contingent.



A mixed response for employees
What would employees think about biometrics? Here is where the most disagreement came into play. The 38 percent who voted for “well received" carried the day, but “poorly received" was hot on their heels with 29 percent. Even “No one will care” had a strong showing in the poll with 16 percent.



Not in my backyard
It’s a great idea, but your company won’t jump on the biometrics bandwagon. That’s what 72 percent of you predicted. That is somewhat surprising considering that most people feel biometric security would be well received on many other levels.



It’s in the way that you use it
Everyone seems to have a different idea about how to use biometric security processes, judging from how evenly your votes were spread among the options. Medical records and personal information barely eclipsed consumer/vendor/client monetary/contract transactions, 24 to 21 percent, respectively.



No two are alike
Good old-fashioned fingerprints took the brass ring on this question about biometric forms with 46 percent. Retina pattern scans, with 29 percent, and handprints, with 17 percent of votes, round out the top choices for what biometric scheme would work best.



None of your business?
There was no clear standout between the two choices here, but biometric security processes inched out personal keys, passwords, and information verification, 53 to 47 percent, for the dubious distinction of being more intrusive.


TechRepublic thanks everyone who participated in this survey. If you have any other revelations about biometric security processes, please comment in the discussion below or send us a note.
Put away that classy fountain pen that cost you a small fortune. That’s right, your Mont Blanc should go in mothballs. It’s officially obsolete.

The Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act was signed into law earlier this summer. Now, with electronic signatures carrying the same weight as signed documents, corporate executives will begin to wonder why they ever had to sign a document in the first place.

We asked TechRepublic members what you thought about electronic signatures and the larger issue of biometric security processes.

Here is what you told us:

Appealing to customers
A majority of you thought biometrics would be well received or very well received by customers, to the combined tune of 61 percent.



Vendors provide a warm reception
A larger majority of you, 76 percent, thought vendors would appreciate the benefits of biometric security. It is easy to see that vendors have the most to lose due to lax security, so any security procedure is likely to be better received by this contingent.



A mixed response for employees
What would employees think about biometrics? Here is where the most disagreement came into play. The 38 percent who voted for “well received" carried the day, but “poorly received" was hot on their heels with 29 percent. Even “No one will care” had a strong showing in the poll with 16 percent.



Not in my backyard
It’s a great idea, but your company won’t jump on the biometrics bandwagon. That’s what 72 percent of you predicted. That is somewhat surprising considering that most people feel biometric security would be well received on many other levels.



It’s in the way that you use it
Everyone seems to have a different idea about how to use biometric security processes, judging from how evenly your votes were spread among the options. Medical records and personal information barely eclipsed consumer/vendor/client monetary/contract transactions, 24 to 21 percent, respectively.



No two are alike
Good old-fashioned fingerprints took the brass ring on this question about biometric forms with 46 percent. Retina pattern scans, with 29 percent, and handprints, with 17 percent of votes, round out the top choices for what biometric scheme would work best.



None of your business?
There was no clear standout between the two choices here, but biometric security processes inched out personal keys, passwords, and information verification, 53 to 47 percent, for the dubious distinction of being more intrusive.


TechRepublic thanks everyone who participated in this survey. If you have any other revelations about biometric security processes, please comment in the discussion below or send us a note.

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