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Survey results: Careers in IT consulting

We recently polled TechRepublic members to find out some specifics about their IT consulting careers. Check out the results.

International Data Corporation predicts that the worldwide IT consulting market will nearly double by 2003.

While IBM Global Services, EDS, and Andersen Consulting are among the giants of the IT services and consulting industry, experts believe the market is wide open. That means that the future is bright for IT professionals who want to try their hand at consulting.

We wanted to find out where TechRepublic members stand in their careers as IT consultants. From our recent consulting career survey—to which more than 1,200 readers responded—we discovered that their skill sets and needs vary widely. Here are the results.

Do you work for a consulting firm or as an independent?
The majority of respondents, 36 percent, do consulting work with a firm. Nearly 30 percent are only considering an entry into the consulting field.
  • With a firm—36 percent
  • I don't work as a consultant right now, I'm just thinking about it—29 percent
  • Both—15 percent
  • As an independent—20 percent

How many clients do you serve in an average month?
Personal attention appears to be important to the majority of consultants who responded. More than half said they dedicate their efforts to five or fewer clients per month.
  • Less than five—52 percent
  • Less than 10—18 percent
  • 20 or more—17 percent
  • Between 10 and 20—13 percent

What are your greatest needs in advancing your career as an IT consultant?
Obtaining additional training and certification is the greatest need in career advancement, according to the results. Marketing, business development, and time and project management are also important.
  • Obtaining additional training and certification—39 percent
  • Determining where to market my skills—19 percent
  • Finding clients—18 percent
  • Enhancing my time and project management skills—13 percent
  • Developing business partnerships—6 percent
  • Hiring qualified staff to grow my business—3 percent
  • Other—2 percent

What is your main area of expertise?
IT consultants offer their services in a variety of areas. Results were fairly evenly divided among networking, programming, support, systems administration, and strategy.
  • Networking—16 percent
  • Programming—16 percent
  • Strategy—16 percent
  • Support—16 percent
  • Systems administration—14 percent
  • Web development—7 percent
  • Hardware—6 percent
  • Other—9 percent
TechRepublic thanks everyone who participated in this survey, and there were a lot of you who did. If you have more to say about this topic, post a comment below or send us a note.
International Data Corporation predicts that the worldwide IT consulting market will nearly double by 2003.

While IBM Global Services, EDS, and Andersen Consulting are among the giants of the IT services and consulting industry, experts believe the market is wide open. That means that the future is bright for IT professionals who want to try their hand at consulting.

We wanted to find out where TechRepublic members stand in their careers as IT consultants. From our recent consulting career survey—to which more than 1,200 readers responded—we discovered that their skill sets and needs vary widely. Here are the results.

Do you work for a consulting firm or as an independent?
The majority of respondents, 36 percent, do consulting work with a firm. Nearly 30 percent are only considering an entry into the consulting field.
  • With a firm—36 percent
  • I don't work as a consultant right now, I'm just thinking about it—29 percent
  • Both—15 percent
  • As an independent—20 percent

How many clients do you serve in an average month?
Personal attention appears to be important to the majority of consultants who responded. More than half said they dedicate their efforts to five or fewer clients per month.
  • Less than five—52 percent
  • Less than 10—18 percent
  • 20 or more—17 percent
  • Between 10 and 20—13 percent

What are your greatest needs in advancing your career as an IT consultant?
Obtaining additional training and certification is the greatest need in career advancement, according to the results. Marketing, business development, and time and project management are also important.
  • Obtaining additional training and certification—39 percent
  • Determining where to market my skills—19 percent
  • Finding clients—18 percent
  • Enhancing my time and project management skills—13 percent
  • Developing business partnerships—6 percent
  • Hiring qualified staff to grow my business—3 percent
  • Other—2 percent

What is your main area of expertise?
IT consultants offer their services in a variety of areas. Results were fairly evenly divided among networking, programming, support, systems administration, and strategy.
  • Networking—16 percent
  • Programming—16 percent
  • Strategy—16 percent
  • Support—16 percent
  • Systems administration—14 percent
  • Web development—7 percent
  • Hardware—6 percent
  • Other—9 percent
TechRepublic thanks everyone who participated in this survey, and there were a lot of you who did. If you have more to say about this topic, post a comment below or send us a note.

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