CXO

Survey results show client satisfaction is vital

We recently asked TechRepublic members how they measure and achieve client satisfaction. Here's what they told us.


It can be frustrating when you dedicate all your resources and several months to a project, only to have the client call back when it’s finished to say, “I’m not quite satisfied with the finished product.”

Experts say it’s likely to happen more often, as IT consultants are expected to take more responsibility for their clients’ key business goals. According to International Data Corporation, the IT industry business model is moving from a highly customized process linked to IT results to a more standardized process tied to business results. In addition, IDC reports, IT services companies will be asked to take more responsibility for their customers’ business strategies and to deliver value.

Because client satisfaction is such a vital part of an IT consultant’s continued livelihood, we wanted to find out what TechRepublic members do to achieve it. We surveyed more than 100 IT consultants, and here’s what we found.

How do you handle a poor evaluation of your service from a client?
Most consultants ensure the quality of their work. They want to retain clients and will do follow-up work to correct problems if necessary.
  • Offer to come back and correct the problem—85 percent
  • Apologize to the client and promise better service in the future—11 percent
  • File it away mentally—4 percent
  • Ignore it—0 percent

How do you measure client satisfaction?
Respondents seem to have comfortable relationships with their clients and can speak openly about the level of satisfaction with their services. Only a small number conduct formal interviews or written surveys to measure client satisfaction.
  • Informal communication—77 percent
  • Formal interviews—12 percent
  • Written surveys—8 percent
  • Other—3 percent

How often do you achieve client satisfaction?
Perfection is rare, it seems. Only 25 percent of consultants said they consistently achieve client satisfaction, but two-thirds do so frequently.
  • Always—25 percent
  • Frequently—67 percent
  • Never—0 percent
  • Occasionally—8 percent
  • Seldom—0 percent

How often do you ask clients to rate your service?
We were surprised to find that only a small number of respondents—less than one-sixth—regularly ask clients to rate their services.
  • Always—12 percent
  • Frequently—28 percent
  • Never—18 percent
  • Occasionally—24 percent
  • Seldom—18 percent

On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 highest, how confident would you say your clients are in the service you perform?
More than half of respondents say clients are pleased with the work they do.
  • 1—2 percent
  • 2—2 percent
  • 3—15 percent
  • 4—54 percent
  • 5—27 percent
What should IT consultants do to keep clients happy? Can an IT consultant survive in this cutthroat industry without achieving client satisfaction on every job? To share your opinion, post a comment below or send us a note.
It can be frustrating when you dedicate all your resources and several months to a project, only to have the client call back when it’s finished to say, “I’m not quite satisfied with the finished product.”

Experts say it’s likely to happen more often, as IT consultants are expected to take more responsibility for their clients’ key business goals. According to International Data Corporation, the IT industry business model is moving from a highly customized process linked to IT results to a more standardized process tied to business results. In addition, IDC reports, IT services companies will be asked to take more responsibility for their customers’ business strategies and to deliver value.

Because client satisfaction is such a vital part of an IT consultant’s continued livelihood, we wanted to find out what TechRepublic members do to achieve it. We surveyed more than 100 IT consultants, and here’s what we found.

How do you handle a poor evaluation of your service from a client?
Most consultants ensure the quality of their work. They want to retain clients and will do follow-up work to correct problems if necessary.
  • Offer to come back and correct the problem—85 percent
  • Apologize to the client and promise better service in the future—11 percent
  • File it away mentally—4 percent
  • Ignore it—0 percent

How do you measure client satisfaction?
Respondents seem to have comfortable relationships with their clients and can speak openly about the level of satisfaction with their services. Only a small number conduct formal interviews or written surveys to measure client satisfaction.
  • Informal communication—77 percent
  • Formal interviews—12 percent
  • Written surveys—8 percent
  • Other—3 percent

How often do you achieve client satisfaction?
Perfection is rare, it seems. Only 25 percent of consultants said they consistently achieve client satisfaction, but two-thirds do so frequently.
  • Always—25 percent
  • Frequently—67 percent
  • Never—0 percent
  • Occasionally—8 percent
  • Seldom—0 percent

How often do you ask clients to rate your service?
We were surprised to find that only a small number of respondents—less than one-sixth—regularly ask clients to rate their services.
  • Always—12 percent
  • Frequently—28 percent
  • Never—18 percent
  • Occasionally—24 percent
  • Seldom—18 percent

On a scale of 1 to 5, with 5 highest, how confident would you say your clients are in the service you perform?
More than half of respondents say clients are pleased with the work they do.
  • 1—2 percent
  • 2—2 percent
  • 3—15 percent
  • 4—54 percent
  • 5—27 percent
What should IT consultants do to keep clients happy? Can an IT consultant survive in this cutthroat industry without achieving client satisfaction on every job? To share your opinion, post a comment below or send us a note.

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