Microsoft

Tech Tip: Command-line keyboard shortcuts/Attach document footers in Win2K

Find out about some command-line keyboard shortcuts, learn how to attach document footers.

Windows 2000 Professional: Use keyboard shortcuts at the command console

Most Windows applications map the keyboard's function keys to certain functions. For example, pressing [F1] typically launches Help functionality.

In addition, the command console also supports function keys. Here's a summary of these function keys:

  • Pressing [F1] copies the characters of the previously executed command one by one to the command prompt.
  • Pressing [F2] displays a dialog box that prompts you to enter a character, and it copies the characters from the previous command up to, but not including, the entered character.
  • Pressing [F3] copies all remaining characters from the previous command from the current cursor location forward to the command prompt.
  • Pressing [F4] is the opposite of pressing [F2]; it deletes all characters from the preceding command line up to, but not including, the entered character.
  • Pressing [F5] cycles back through the previous commands, starting from the current location in the buffer (the currently displayed command); it pastes them to the command prompt but doesn't execute them.
  • Pressing [F6] is the same as pressing [Ctrl]Z.
  • Pressing [F7] displays a menu of the previous commands, allowing you to select and execute a command.
  • Pressing [F8] cycles back through the previous commands, starting with the last command in the buffer; it copies the commands to the command prompt but doesn't execute them.
  • Pressing [F9] displays a dialog box that prompts you for a buffer number; it copies the command in that line of the buffer to the command prompt but doesn't execute it.

By default, the console's command buffer holds 50 lines, but you can increase the buffer size up to 999 lines.

Also by default, up to four console processes can have a unique buffer, but you can increase the number of processes up to 999. Click the console's Control button, and choose Properties to set the Buffer Size and Number Of Buffers properties.

Windows 2000 Server: Brand Web sites with document footers

Most Web sites include some type of footer content that provides a text-based site menu, copyright information, or other common content. Many Web site developers include this content on each page.

Development tools such as Dreamweaver make it relatively easy to add and update this kind of content from a library. But changing the footer content can require substantial work to propagate the changes across an entire site. Internet Information Services (IIS) offers an often overlooked feature that can help avoid some of this work.

IIS supports the use of a document footer, an HTML-formatted document that IIS attaches to each page it serves. You can assign a document footer at the site level to attach it to all site pages, or you can assign them on a directory-by-directory basis. However, you can only use document footers with static content.

To assign a footer, open the IIS console, and open the Properties for the site or directory where you want to assign the footer. On the Documents tab, select the Enable Document Footer option, and choose the HTML file that contains the footer content. Click OK, and close the Properties dialog box.

Because document footers don't work with dynamic content, an alternative is the use of server-side includes (SSI) statements in the document. An SSI statement directs IIS to include the content from a specified document in the current document. You can use multiple SSI statements in a single document.

For more information on using SSI statements, check out Microsoft Knowledge Base article 203064.

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