Microsoft

Tech Tip: Get to know Microsoft's Active Directory Application in Windows Server 2003

Learn about Microsoft's Active Directory Application.

Microsoft developed the Active Directory Application Mode (ADAM) to meet the needs of developers, software vendors, and client organizations that need a more flexible directory architecture. Unlike Active Directory, which runs as a system service and can only run on a domain controller, ADAM is a user-mode service that can run on any Windows Server 2003 or Windows XP system—even Windows Server 2003 systems that aren't domain controllers.

A lot of confusion exists about the benefits provided by ADAM. Here's a list of some of the business problems you can use ADAM to solve:

  • A software vendor wants to produce a directory-enabled application that doesn't interfere with or disrupt an organization's existing Active Directory, NDS, or LDAP infrastructure.
  • A software vendor wants to produce a directory-enabled application that organizations can deploy in an environment that doesn't have an enterprise directory.
  • A business unit wants to manage unit-specific directory schema extensions that could prove difficult to install across the organization.
  • An application developer wants to develop a directory-enabled application but doesn't want to work directly with the company's Active Directory.
  • An application developer wants to develop a directory-enabled application but doesn't want to take the time to design a full Active Directory implementation for development purposes.

Each of these scenarios presents a perfect business case for ADAM. For more information, visit the Windows Server 2003 Active Directory Application Mode Web page.

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