Microsoft

Tech Tip: Increase the amount of space the Windows NT registry can consume

Some registry settings apply to the registry itself, which can also impact performance. Learn how you can up the amount of space the registry can use.

It's a good bet that you're familiar with using Regedt32 to make registry edits to tweak your NT system's performance. In fact, we often point you to quick registry tweaks you can make to enhance your system.

What you may not realize, however, is that some registry settings apply to the registry itself, which can also impact performance. Windows stores registry data in the paged pool (also known as the paging file), an area of physical memory used for system data that the system can write to disk when not in use.

The HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control registry key includes the RegistrySizeLimit setting. This setting establishes the maximum amount of paged pool space that registry data from all applications can use. By design, this setting ensures that the registry doesn't eat up space needed by processes.

RegistrySizeLimit's default value is 25 percent of the size of the paged pool. Typically, the paged pool is 32 MB, so your registry entry would be 8 MB. You can edit this entry to give the registry up to 80 percent of the paged pool (which can be helpful for intensive graphics applications, for example).

Note: Editing the registry is risky, so be sure you have a verified backup before making any changes.

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