Enterprise Software

Tech Tip: Navigate Word tables/Empty Excel cells before deleting/Omit duplicate Access records

Learn how to navigate tables with keyboard shortcuts, make sure cells are empty before deleting a column or row, and omit records with duplicate field entries in a query.

Navigate tables with these keyboard shortcuts

The most common method for moving around a table is to click the specific cell you want to go to. However, if the table contains many rows and columns across a page, you could spend a great deal of time scrolling.

Word provides a number of keyboard shortcuts for quickly moving around large tables. Here are some examples:

  • Press [Alt][Home] to move the cursor to the first cell in the current row.
  • Press [Alt][End] to move the cursor to the last cell in the current row.
  • Press [Alt][PageUp] to move the cursor to the first cell in the current column.
  • Press [Alt][PageDown] to move the cursor to the last cell in the current column.
  • Press [Tab] to move the cursor to the next cell.
  • Press [Shift][Tab] to move the cursor to the preceding cell.
  • To set a tab within a cell, click inside the cell, and press [Ctrl][Tab].

Ensure all cells are empty before deleting a column or row

Before deleting a row or column that appears to be empty, it's a good idea to check beyond the screen view to ensure that all the cells are really blank. While you can scroll to the end of a column or row, it can be much quicker to use keyboard shortcuts.

To check whether a row is empty, follow these steps:

  1. Click any cell in the row.
  2. Press [Ctrl] and the right arrow key. If the cursor stops at column IV, the row is empty.

To check whether a column is empty, follow these steps:

  1. Click any cell in the column.
  2. Press [Ctrl] and the down arrow key. If the cursor stops at row 65536, the row is empty.

Omit records with duplicate field entries in a query

You can create a query that returns only those records that don't contain duplicate data in a field. For example, suppose you want to query the Orders database to determine the total number of households in New Jersey that placed orders last year.

Since the Orders database includes multiple records for each address, you want to set the query properties so it includes each household only once in the query results.

Follow these steps:

  1. Open the query in Design view, and click the Properties button in the Query Design toolbar.
  2. Change the Unique Values property to Yes.

If the query output includes the address and name fields for each order, Access will include only those records with unique address fields in the output.

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