Enterprise Software

TechRepublic makes UNIX a little less complicated

UNIX can be a real bear to work with sometimes—but, lucky for you, we are here to help. Here is a list of TechRepublic articles that can help to make UNIX more manageable.


It can often be difficult for UNIX users to find good information on the Internet to assist them in day-to-day tasks. TechRepublic understands this and wants to make your life a little easier. In this article, we’ve compiled a list of previously published TechRepublic articles covering UNIX tips and tricks, applications, and other useful information. Read on and click through to find out what you need to know to make UNIX a friendlier OS.

The ELM cheat sheet
Most operations in UNIX require the use of keyboard commands. The same holds true for ELM, an e-mail program often included in UNIX distributions. TechRepublic has collected the main key commands for this application and placed them into an easy-to-read cheat sheet designed for both beginners and experts. Read the TechRepublic article “Download our cheat sheet for ELM: UNIX e-mail” for more information.

Virtual Network Computing
If you’re a fan of remote PC software, such as PCAnywhere, you may be interested in a product developed by AT&T Laboratories Cambridge. VNC, or Virtual Network Computing, is a free application that allows a client machine to control a host PC from virtually anywhere in the world, as long as there is an Internet connection available. Developed for multiple operating systems, this application allows you to control a UNIX machine from a Windows PC or a Macintosh via a UNIX machine. You can find out more about this software by reading “Virtual network computing—free virtual networking software from AT&T.”

The VI cheat sheet
If you’ve ever had the opportunity to use VI in either a UNIX- or Linux-based environment, you understand how difficult this text application can be to use. So why bother? The simple answer is that VI exists on virtually every UNIX distribution on the market today and is available for use over an Internet connection. To make using this application a little less complicated, TechRepublic has compiled a list of user commands for VI. You can find out more by reading the article “Use our VI cheat sheets to edit text more effectively in UNIX.”

Give yourself permissions
Have you ever tried to execute a file on a UNIX box only to discover that your account didn’t have permissions to do so? By using the command “ls –l” in a directory, you will discover that every file in any directory has specific permissions: Read, Write, and Execute. In the TechRepublic article “UNIX permissions made easy,” we show you how to set up permissions for specific files by using the “chmod” command followed by specific variables.
If you’re interested in finding more useful UNIX resources, look no further than TechRepublic. You can find a variety of UNIX information simply by searching our database for articles, columns, and downloads. If there is a specific topic that you’d like to see covered, let us know by posting a comment below or sending us a note with your thoughts.
It can often be difficult for UNIX users to find good information on the Internet to assist them in day-to-day tasks. TechRepublic understands this and wants to make your life a little easier. In this article, we’ve compiled a list of previously published TechRepublic articles covering UNIX tips and tricks, applications, and other useful information. Read on and click through to find out what you need to know to make UNIX a friendlier OS.

The ELM cheat sheet
Most operations in UNIX require the use of keyboard commands. The same holds true for ELM, an e-mail program often included in UNIX distributions. TechRepublic has collected the main key commands for this application and placed them into an easy-to-read cheat sheet designed for both beginners and experts. Read the TechRepublic article “Download our cheat sheet for ELM: UNIX e-mail” for more information.

Virtual Network Computing
If you’re a fan of remote PC software, such as PCAnywhere, you may be interested in a product developed by AT&T Laboratories Cambridge. VNC, or Virtual Network Computing, is a free application that allows a client machine to control a host PC from virtually anywhere in the world, as long as there is an Internet connection available. Developed for multiple operating systems, this application allows you to control a UNIX machine from a Windows PC or a Macintosh via a UNIX machine. You can find out more about this software by reading “Virtual network computing—free virtual networking software from AT&T.”

The VI cheat sheet
If you’ve ever had the opportunity to use VI in either a UNIX- or Linux-based environment, you understand how difficult this text application can be to use. So why bother? The simple answer is that VI exists on virtually every UNIX distribution on the market today and is available for use over an Internet connection. To make using this application a little less complicated, TechRepublic has compiled a list of user commands for VI. You can find out more by reading the article “Use our VI cheat sheets to edit text more effectively in UNIX.”

Give yourself permissions
Have you ever tried to execute a file on a UNIX box only to discover that your account didn’t have permissions to do so? By using the command “ls –l” in a directory, you will discover that every file in any directory has specific permissions: Read, Write, and Execute. In the TechRepublic article “UNIX permissions made easy,” we show you how to set up permissions for specific files by using the “chmod” command followed by specific variables.
If you’re interested in finding more useful UNIX resources, look no further than TechRepublic. You can find a variety of UNIX information simply by searching our database for articles, columns, and downloads. If there is a specific topic that you’d like to see covered, let us know by posting a comment below or sending us a note with your thoughts.

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