Developer

The break-up of Borland

This week I caught up with David Intersomone, VP of developer relations worldwide, and Malcolm Groves, regional product director for Asia Pacific, from Borland's Developer Tools Group to talk about the immediate and planned future of the group once this division is sold by Borland.

This week I caught up with David Intersimone, VP of developer relations worldwide, and Malcolm Groves, regional product director for Asia Pacific, from Borland's Developer Tools Group to talk about the immediate and planned future of the group once this division is sold by Borland. Borland Corporation are on the verge of naming the details of it's planned sale of its developer tools business — which means Groves and Intersomone should be getting new logos on their business cards soon.



Unfortunately we couldn't get any further update on who is buying their developer tools division, or exactly what name the tools will be released under. According to Groves the deal is 'with lawyers', which suggests the announcement is near.



Borland's decision to sell their developer tools division is a move by the company to focus on the Application Lifecycle Management (ALM) side of the business which sell products and services around gathering requirements, model-driven development, change management, and testing. Borland was born and made its bread and butter on providing tools to developers so it's a large change and makeover for the company moving ahead without its tools division.



Borland might not be investing in the IDE space once the tools division is sold, but Intersimone is upbeat about the future roadmap and direction and feels there is still plenty of money to be made in the tools space "If you give it enough care and attention", Intersimone told Builder AU.



One of these areas of care and attention seems to be the focus on grassroots development, students, non-programmers and hobbyists by the tools division.



The developer tools group is focused on bringing back the nostalgic feeling of using Borland tools by re-introducing the "Turbo" name and making easy-to-use IDE's for hobbyists and entry non-programmers to get started including Turbo C++, Turbo Delphi, Turbo Delphi .NET, and Turbo C#. The good news is that the entry level tools will be free, and the professional versions will be at a cost "less than $500 dollars". However, the new tools are single platform solutions and users wanting to use an environment for multi-language and multi-platform are recommended to use Borland Developer Studio. If you're looking for more information on the Turbo products visit the official FAQ and the official Turbo Web site.



New areas of development the tools division is currently working on is with dynamic languages such as PHP, Python, and Ruby and making AJAX development easier. Past Web-based development the company is also focused on making better tools for 64-bit development, mobile development, and a new version of JBuilder based on the open source Eclipse platform.



It'll be an interesting time to keep an eye on the Borland developer tools division once it is outside Borland's control. It seems this 'for sale' area of the company have plenty to keep themselves busy and are armed with the personnel and R&D to get the job done. Borland made a name with developers in the 80s with the Turbo brand and the new company in charge of their tools division may just see history repeating itself with this new effort.

Editor's Picks

Free Newsletters, In your Inbox