Apple

Trend: To avoid giving free tech support, IT pros recommend Macs to friends and family

IT pros are diehard when it comes to their recommendations on personal computers, but some are bending their convictions to avoid becoming a go-to support system

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 Image: iStockphoto/Smithore

As an IT pro, it can be hard to explain just what you do to your friends and family. Failed attempts to explain what a system administrator is results in you answering the question of, "What do you do?" with simply "I work in computers."

Being known as the "techie" of your family is nice little boost to your ego in the beginning, but it can quickly become the most frustrating aspect of your existence. Recommending a computer to a friend or family isn't the hard part, it's the hand-holding and support that comes with it. To get around this, many IT pros, who are resilient in their pledge to support Windows or Linux products, have begun recommending Apple computers.

When it comes to personal computers, Microsoft and Apple are still the warring factions of the IT world, but stepping over the proverbial line in the sand doesn't hold the connotations that it used to. By recommending Apple products, IT pros are able to avoid some of the most common troubleshooting issues and pawn off some of the work.

Part of this has to do with the products themselves, and the other part of it is the existing support structure Apple has created. Let's take a look at why some IT pros are doing what would have once been considered unthinkable and pointing recommendees toward Macs.

The products

One of the main groans we hear from our readers is the lack of customization with Apple products, and it's true. Apple owners are subject to the pre-set packages that the company deems appropriate while Windows and Linux users have a myriad of options when buying or building a machine. But, most average users aren't looking for that level of customizability.

Andrew Soderberg, vice president of customer support at OmniUpdate, Inc. and a long-standing Mac proponent, said that ceding that control is a blessing, not a curse.

"I used to 'love' getting in and customizing and tweaking computer settings for myself and others. Now, as much as I like the idea of 'total control', I don't have the time or the inclination to do that; and with a Mac, you don't have to. I believe that Apple has found a pretty good balance between flexibility for the user (via safe well designed user interfaces) and 'lock down' where users shouldn't or can't mess with settings they don't know how they affect the use of the computer," Soderberg said.

For most family tech support providers, malware cleanup and software/OS installs are the majority of what they end up dealing with. While Apple products are not impervious to malware attacks, they are easier to keep clean. If you have to end up troubleshooting a Mac, running a McAfee scan probably won't turn up much. Abdul Jaludi, CEO at TAG-MC, recalls the calls he used to received from friends and family with Windows products.

"Many of these calls were technical issues where the vendor technical support dropped the ball and gave them bad information or just didn't want to be bothered, telling them they needed a new PC. I can't remember how many times I had to rebuild a PC that I recommended someone buy because of the blue screen of death or a virus infection," Jaludi said.

A lot of what finally pushes IT pros over the line to recommend Apple products is the "set it and forget it" mentality of their products. It's not that any one tech pro hates their family members, but constantly seeing your family under the guise of fixing a computer can put a strain on that relationship. While you will probably end up troubleshooting a Mac or two that you have recommended, the good news is that you don't have to if that person lives close to an Apple store -- pawn them off on the "Geniuses."

SEE: Decoding the Genius Bar: A former employee shares insider secrets for getting help at the Apple Store

Outsourcing

For those of you that can't stand to field another call about why an iPhone won't sync or why there is a spinning beachball of death, the Apple Store can help bail them out.

"If I do decide to help a friend or family [with a Mac], I can figure it out. If I am to busy or the client doesn't have a budget, Apple does offer great support in-store and with the purchase of Applecare," said Adam Silver, creative director at Silver Lining Productions.

Busy tech professionals have to consider how much their time is worth, and do they want to be spending their evenings and weekends doing what they do in their day job. Many of them have decided that they don't, and that it is easier to recommend people to get Macs and use the Apple Store for support.

"When the hard drive on my wife's Mac started making noise we took it to the Apple Store. They backed up her data, replaced the failing hard drive, reinstalled the operating system then restored her data," Jaludi said. "It only took them a day and even though the warranty had been expired for several years, they only charged her for the hard drive and not for the labor to replace it, reinstall the Mac OS or to move her data. If this had been a Windows PC, even if it was under warranty, I would had to spend an entire day or more doing the same thing."

What do you think?

We want to know? Have you recommended Apple products to friends and family, or did you bite the bullet and point them to a Windows machine? Am I completely off-base? (I probably am) Sound off in the comments!

Also see

About

Conner Forrest is a Staff Writer for TechRepublic. He covers Google and startups and is passionate about the convergence of technology and culture.

126 comments
John_LI_IT_Guy
John_LI_IT_Guy

I agree, if they've never experienced Windows 8 I'd recommend a Mac. I've never seen a non-geek say I'm going back to Windows.


Who in their right mind would recommend Linux to non-techie friends and family??? Wasn't the title of this article "Trend: To avoid giving free tech support, IT pros recommend Macs to friends and family"??? Nothing against Linux but your phone will be ringing off the hook. How do I install my printer driver? How do I install software? How do I copy files to my flash drive? Where do I find Evernote for Linux??? 


I've already noticed the drop off in friends and family support calls since the popularity of the tablets has grown.

Zudjiian
Zudjiian

Did I miss something here? I thought this place had IT Pros. Complaints of bloat ware and not being able to configure your own machine are very much in attendance here.

As an IT Pro, I would assume people would know how to uninstall bloat ware, oh yeah, I know it takes almost 20 mins out of your day and once your done its fine. But hay If you want to pay $700 more for a different machine be my guest. Which is about 2100 an hour. Be my guest.

As for me yes I believe the Win 7 machine is superior by and far. As a "Pro" I bought a win 7 system builder edition (that's a version of windows that is no bloat ware and costs 1/3 the price) and have had nothing but enjoyment out of it. After 2 years it runs just as fast according to my logs.

Complaints of Mac vs Apple are far and wide. Truth is, both make a great machine. Difference is they are originally intended for different purposes and are finally starting to cross over into each others territories. Hence all the whining. Mac's are easier for the computer illiterate and basic home user, Pros and Business are Windows all the way.

So yeah, some of us "recommend Macs instead of Pc's"  because we actually know the user.

slimjim09
slimjim09

Mac is JUNK !! We do support junk because any time we had a call on them, the owners always had a large bill. Nothing is reasonable or cheap on these. Thank GOD we have other systems we can fix that are a lot more reasonable for the customer.

vjet707
vjet707

I recommend Macs.Not because I can't be bothered helping out but because I cannot with good conscience recommend Windows 8 to anyone who has previously used XP or Windows 7 or even worse to a complete newbie. Things just work on Mac. You don't have to spend hours Googling solutions to issues that shouldn't even be there in the first place.

drgbrice
drgbrice

I set up a Family Medical Practice, with iMacs, because I have observed so many hassles and such large costs being incurred by other Medical Practices running on PC's.  My IT costs for my own practice have been negligible. With 11 doctors and 6 Allied Health Staff, I have saved a small fortune over the past 4 years, to save nothing of the time saving, and the freedom from hassles.   

Wyomingpat
Wyomingpat

I bought a New Lenovo PC for my home office last June. $600 for Quad Core Intel, 8G + 2TB and Windows 8. I needed a PC just for a SQLServer application. I have sworn and kicked this machine for 9 months. W8 has been driving me nuts - total bloatware. My old XP machine it replaced - with 3G - was faster and less trouble. I had AVG running and I am sure that takes resources just to keep the Blue Meanies out. Even then it was collecting malware every scan.


I have had a Macbook Pro since 2010 and a Crucial Disk upgrade and with 8G memory it flies and runs Parallels. So I went out and bought a Mac Mini Quad Core with 16G upgrade for another $150 and Jesus is it good? It synched to my mac all my passwords and other information and all my apps I had bought installed themselves from the app store


I have Parallels loaded for my SQLServer under W7 plus a couple of other Windows apps and it is way faster.

I have the PC up for sale at a big loss but I may just take the 2T disk out and use it as extra storage for the Mac. My stress levels are down!

Rich7Mallory
Rich7Mallory

I think you're right on.  My wife and I used to use PCs, and they were considerably more trouble than the Macs we switched to.  Mostly, Macs "just work" (though not always) and PCs have a lot more problems.  I still use Windows at work and continue to see that it has more problems than my Mac.  The main IT person at one of my previous jobs -- a Mac enthusiast -- had the same opinion.


captainanalog
captainanalog

And, the number one reason why IT professionals should recommend buying a Mac?

Because Mac users don't need you. From day one Macs have been easy to network, at least amongst themselves. My Macs can find, and talk to ANYTHING they find on the network, no questions except passwords (not even that if their part of my keychain), no system re-configuration, and NO DAMN WIZARD to go through any time I wish to add a node to my network.

As far as system migration goes, again the Mac makes it easy. I moved my entire system, preferences, libraries, hidden files, and apps included, to a newer Mac in about a half hour.

My mother and her friend have been trying to migrate her stuff to a new PC. Two retired systems analysts, three weeks, and they're still not finished!

qhcomputingny
qhcomputingny

This article is a joke!  Apple's die just as quick as ANY other computer.  It's been said a thousand times before, Apple's cost a hell of a lot more, and the average person can't do anything on a Mac that they can't already do on a Windows PC.  The old adage of Windows gets viruses is a bunch of BS.  This isn't 2003.  I would never recommend an Apple product to a friend or family member.

Julees
Julees

I wear a T shirt with "No I will not fix your computer" written on it, to family gatherings.

baryah
baryah

The basic diff between a mac and Windows/Linux - as i see it - there are perhaps a 100 ways of doing one thing in windows as well as linux - but there is one way to do a hundred things in mac. that explains a lot.

'techy'
'techy'

I have to say, if someone with little or no computer knowledge asks which phone or tablet they should buy, I always point them to an Apple product. I'm just saying, they are incredibly easier to use.


BUT, if they have been using Windows for a long time, then I'd recommend that vs an osx device because I'd have to spend time teaching them how to use it.

EnterpriseITGuy
EnterpriseITGuy

I recommend my family purchase a Windows RT (Surface 2) device for this reason.  They get Office in the form they need, they get access to a load of apps and their "mail", and they cant install any of the 3rd party "helper" toolbars that are the source of the majority of issues.  My experience with Mavericks in particular would preclude me from ever recommending a Mac system again.

powersm66
powersm66

I agree with the main thesis of this article.   My mom had a Windows laptop and desktop.  Tired of all the little Windows issues that wouldn't phase an IT Pro but freaked her out I got her an iPad Mini.  The call volume for tech support has dropped off dramatically.  The iPad Mini was a gift as much to me as to her.  


I use all platforms iOS, Windows, Mac OS X.  From an admin standpoint I know more about OS X and iOS so I am biased.  Certainly, the admin tools for Windows are numerous and mature.  But the recent cryptolocker scare just makes wary of Windows.  Yes,  I locked it down with a GPO but how frustrating that the inherent OS architecture allows something as crazy as cryptolocker.   Forget about supporting your friends and family with an issue like this. 

genesis623
genesis623

To be completely honest most people I recommend them to complain about the price of macs versus Windows. When I explain to them they could potentially spend just as much money on there Windows based machine to make it last as long as a mac they jump aboard ship.

Henry3Dogg
Henry3Dogg

The biggest reason that I recommend Macs to friends is this.


The Mac is the ONLY environment which provides users with a backup mechanism where the average user stands any chance of 

1) reliably backing the machine up regularly and then 

2) actually fully recovering that machine after a serious failure and 

3) selectively recovering accidentally deleted material

without running a serious risk of making matters worse,  or requiring professional help.

With Windows, the average user would stand no chance whatsoever

bannorbg
bannorbg

Troll article? Having a MacBook Pro and multiple PCs, I definitely spend way more time googling Mac OS issues.

Henry3Dogg
Henry3Dogg

"One of the main groans we hear from our readers is the lack of customization with Apple products, and it's true. Apple owners are subject to the pre-set packages that the company deems appropriate while Windows and Linux users have a myriad of options when buying or building a machine. But, most average users aren't looking for that level of customisability"


OK,  so you can't tell the different between a Mac and an iPad.


Apple does not in any way limit what software a user can install on his Mac.

warboat
warboat

IF YOU RECOMMEND THEM A MAC, I GUARANTEE YOU that you will be asked how the USB printer , scanner, <insert USB device> doesn't work every now and then in VM or that Windows crashes with crappy Boot Camp drivers.

If they need to use windows, get them a machine running windows natively, not a fricken MAC trying to run windows.

If they are so stupid that they could be happy JUST using Mac software, then you would be better off putting a Chromebook in front of them which is the MOST noob friendly OS on the planet.

Macs are only viable if you know how to maintain them and willing to understand the workarounds like a true Apple fanboy. It doesn't JUST WORK, it's JUST WORKAROUNDS.

secondstartech
secondstartech

This is stupid.  I've had two Mac's on my desk in the last week and Zero PC's.  All from family.

chdchan
chdchan

Get a fool-proof computers for your friends and kins, or get blamed some time later.

Altotus
Altotus

Most issues are trivial to solve for any system. Paying for Apple is not trivial and fixing apple is very simple trash it and buy another see how much simpler can it get? Avoid the expensive crew that targets you wallet. Linux runs on the hardware you are ready to throw away and runs well give it a try. Many different spins try Ubuntu first time or one of the windows like distros if you are used to Windows. Try a live disk. DIY it.

pgolus
pgolus

Not off base but maybe a discussion that is loosing relevance. 


Even though I use them all the time in business, I steer most family and friends as far away from PCs as possible. Widows or Linux, it doesn't matter; either is a nightmare to support for the non-tech savvy family member or friend.  I used to but I don't recommend Macs to family or friends very often these days either.


Instead I suggest a tablet, with Apple as my preference because of the more tightly controlled ecosystem and more consistent look & feel across applications. I am seeing fewer and fewer instances where the average family user even needs a PC or a Mac.


As for the Apple cost premium, if someone keeps coming to me to try and save a buck at my expense, I have no problem pushing that cost back on them by pointing them towards Apple. Apple support will at least answer the phone and that gets me off the hook.

Trentski
Trentski

Connor has no idea, I used to work for a company that sold mac's and they are a nightmare to support

No way would I recommend apple to anyone, because they would be calling me non stop on how to use them, even though they are basic, most people aren't used to having to dumb yourself down just to use the OS

warboat
warboat

@vjet707  

No, instead you go to Microsoft Knowledge base to read about workarounds for issues running Windows on your Mac and posting on Macrumors for help.

get real, I use both OSX and Windows and all the weird problems are usually on the OSX side.

If you stay within the lines using OSX out of the box, then you may get away with "it just works" but then you could easily do the same with Windows 7 or 8.

Complete newbies take to windows 8 really easily, they don't have a habitual paradigm that they need to adjust.

alexisgarcia72
alexisgarcia72

@captainanalog  I setup windows pc with one admin account and one standard account for the user. No problem at all with win7 or win8. no complains, no user calls, they just works and works.


They are very happy because with "less" money (compared with what you pay for a mac), they purchase a great core i7, dual screen, ssd, 8gb ram pc. even touch screen.


And when they want to upgrade, I use windows easy transfer to move email and data from the old pc to the new one, in just minutes.



Wyomingpat
Wyomingpat

@qhcomputingny  I have been using PCs since 1984. My first was an Apricot. I have always sworn my next would be a Mac but when at the store I see the Windows Laptop at $500 and the Macbook at $1100 and bought the Wu-indows machine. I learned my lesson. My daughter bought me a Macbook Pro in 2010 and I have never looked back. Since then it has upgraded to 8G memory and Crucial 500G disk. It really flies - can you say that of a 4 year old Windows Laptop? Just dumped my Big Windows desktop I bought for my home office 9 moths ago. Windows 8 has been so stressful and time consuming. Bought a Mac mini and it pretty much set itself up and loaded all my apps etc. 


Cost of ownership in cash and stress is way less with a Mac. 

Stiff9x
Stiff9x

@powersm66  I agree, My recommendations are mac and linux, I even bought my Mother her iPad Mini.  Very few support calls from family or friends as Windows user friendly is no longer so user friendly.

warboat
warboat

@powersm66

WHAT?

and the MASSIVE iOS and OSX SSL flaw that went for 18 months inspired you with confidence in Apple security?

Andrea Solinas
Andrea Solinas

@genesis623 My Sony Vaio is 8 years old and still in great shape !!!  if it was a Mac i would be forced to buy a new one in order to run any new programs.... I also have a Mac and is just there getting dusty, because it is so difficult to find something that run on 10.4 ....yet any program for windows even the newest one still run on XP.


warboat
warboat

@genesis623

that's complete BULLSH17 that Macs last longer.

The limiting factor will be Apple making your Mac obsolete thru OS updates.

A gen1 Macbook Air and just about any Mac 5yo+ is already off the list for Mavericks so the "Macs Last Longer" argument is pretty much just a myth.

Resale value of Macs drop right off as they can't support the latest OS. It is a long term TCO trap.

bannorbg
bannorbg

@Henry3Dogg  have you any idea on what is on offer out there? Sounds like you have ONLY looked at Macs. The average user would have no chance on any of the offerings. Yes, posting this from my Mac.

warboat
warboat

@Henry3Dogg  

wow, such pure ignorance.

enterprises relying on windows must have been gambling all these years eh?

It's like Apple invented incremental backups....in 2011.

davidthornton
davidthornton

@Henry3Dogg  Exactly my thought. Anybody who knows his way around Unix can tweak and twiddle to his heart's content in OS X. There's a lot more to it than what's available in the GUI. 

warboat
warboat

@Henry3Dogg  

Actually they do, Apple ARTIFICIALLY ljmits which Mac can run Mavericks.

bannorbg
bannorbg

@Henry3Dogg  except in what you can actually run on the Mac OS. The limit is in what is offered, sfa.

Henry3Dogg
Henry3Dogg

@warboat  


"If they need to use windows, get them a machine running windows natively, not a fricken MAC trying to run windows."


I strongly disagree.


The ONLY safe way to run Windows is as a virtual machine which you can snapshot regularly, and particularly before allowing Windows updates.


There is no earthly reason to also run windows as the native operating system since that exposes you to all the risks that you are trying to avoid in the first place.

JulesLt
JulesLt

@warboat I don't get why someone has to be 'stupid' to be happy 'JUST' using Mac software. 

I use both platforms on a daily basis, and the reason I got a Mac in the first place was because of the clear superiority of software like TextMate, Keynote, Transmit, plus the full Unix environment underneath, and tools like Automator. It was a phenomenal platform for software development.


The only place I find Windows to be demonstratably better is with Oracle support - there have been periods of years where Oracle have lagged behind in driver support, and the 32/64 bit transition was a POA. And that is quite a niche usage.


That was 2005 - I think it's a much closer call now, with Linux picking up speeds as server-side developers 'OS of choice'.

As for your last sentence, isn't that equally true of <insert platform name here>?  

It was definitely true when I supported VMS machines, or was a Unix sysadmin, or when I used Atari ST at home. I'd also say I never had any problems with my windows PCs, only my family's.

 

JulesLt
JulesLt

@secondstartech Well that sounds like a great piece of statistical analysis, from which I should conclude that Apple products are infinitely less reliable that PCs (due to the divide by zero).


A more useful number would be the average over a 24 month period, taking into account the population size of each platform.

Even that wouldn't be really meaningful - we found, by analysing the failure rate of our own PCs, that the vast majority of failures were in the bottom end Dell laptops.  The mid-range ones were hugely more reliable. 

You'd also need to split out OS re-installs, hardware support and 'other' (settings, software) support.

My equally anecdotal evidence is that I have only had to re-install OS X once since 2005, encountered about the usual number of hardware issues (hard-drives are hard-drives) and probably about the same number of 'I can't get Audacity to work' software issues. And zero virus infestations.

Whereas the thing that really wipes my time out with family IT support is backing up (which they don't do), re-installing Windows, and then re-installing from back-up.

glorious
glorious

@Trentski  I believe the point is, you have them buy applecare and then you don't have to support them. Apple does. 

warboat
warboat

@Wyomingpat @qhcomputingny 

"It really flies - can you say that of a 4 year old Windows Laptop?"

what 4yo laptop are you comparing the Macbook Pro with? a $300 budget laptop?

I use a Dell XPS 1645 from 2010 and it dual boots Windows and Linux and runs OSX in a VM.

it has 12gb RAM and it is fairly fast for a laptop. I bought an 2011 XPS 15 recently for $300 which would smack BOTH the 2010 Macbook Pro and my Dell 1645. Can you get a Macbook that would even come close to something like that for even double that?

If you jumped from a typical Core2Duo 2010 Macbook with 2gb RAM to an i7 Dell XPS 1645, you would also say the Dell flies compared to the slow Macbook.

A lot of Mac converts compare their cheap windows machines with a new Macbook and assume ALL windows machines are slow.

tfg56
tfg56

@warboat  Sorry to disagree, I support three Apple servers, a  mix of 26 Apple (17 running VMware Windows7 and 8) and 15 PC desktops, two websites and have used various OS's since before Microsoft. Stopped owning PC's with Windows when I was doing Beta testing for Vista. Tested the waters with owning a Mac and haven't looked back. MUCH lower stress level. My first new (6 year old) Apple Laptop was (still have it) the original Mac Air with 2GB of solid state RAM which very happily runs Mavericks and Windows7 in VMware just like my newer 16GB RAM Macbook Pro laptop. 


70% of my work support is on the Windows machine updates and problems, 20% on installed software updates and problems and 10% on combined Apple updates and installed software. I even still have my first Black Macbook from 2006 that I bought used on eBay in 2007 to see if I wanted to use the Apple equipment. I put Mt. Lion on it just to see if I could. It's not the fastest horse in the barn, but functions OK. The battery is shot and I just keep it around to test something that might mess up my new Mac's and for "old times".


Lets see if your 8 year old PC can run Win8 in 2GB of RAM. OBTW, it's running Lion Server in a separate partition that I used to learn the differences in Lion Server back in the day. Served out material slow but just fine when was connected to the internet.

davidthornton
davidthornton

@warboat  Bah. Mavericks doesn't do much of anything that the previous cats can't do (other than require more memory), and security updates for the earlier OSs still roll in via Software Update. I used my G4 PowerBook for almost 8 years, well beyond the point where I could no longer update the OS to the latest/greatest iteration.( I replaced it with a MacBook Pro in 2012, but had to install more memory when I upgraded it to Mavericks because it didn't run well with the original 4GB. 16 is much better.)

cpguru21
cpguru21

@warboat - there can be no denying that backing up a mac based system is soooo much easier (as far as FULL backup) vs a windows machine, and recovery is just as easy.  The ease of use to the common man/woman makes it an excellent fit.

Thats not to say that there isnt nice solutions out there for windows, but baked into the os? I mean come on.

What do they say?  If it was easy everyone would be doing it?

Here is the easiest way I can break it down:

The majority of Windows users I know (professional oe personal) do not have backups unless an IT admin like myself set it up for them. 

The majority of Mac users I know backup and have been backing up for years, on their own, with no extra IT admin help.

This speaks volumes. 

This comment was posted on my wicked awesome Win8.1 MSI GS70 (yes im from new england)

Honestly the lack of an easy to use windows product (again that's easy to use for the common consumer, not you or me) keeps me employed after hours on many side jobs.

powersm66
powersm66

@warboat @Henry3Dogg   2 comments:  to say TimeMachine is reliable is a stretch but it is baked into the OS and when working can be a life saver.   On the other hand,  TimeMachine is comprehensible to the non-IT pro whereas Windows backup is not as intuitive.  @Henry3Dogg the key word in your comment is "enterprises."  This article is about the non-enterprise users and not about whatever enterprise backup system has been setup and working.  

warboat
warboat

@Henry3Dogg @warboat 

Windows as a virtual machine just introduces so many problems like port sharing issues in OSX. I would not want to be taking support calls for VM issues.

It is not that hard to have windows setup fairly securely or to lock it down completely if you directly support it.

A good reason to use windows natively is the average user doesn't have a beast with excess RAM to run a Windows VM and if they did, that excess RAM would be better used by Windows and/or the apps natively.

Apple leaving SSL vulnerable for 18 months should be confidence shattering enough to avoid OSX as a secure platform.

warboat
warboat

@JulesLt @warboat 

Your average user doesn't want to read about installing xwindows to use Unix wares with Mountain Lion or Mavericks. Clearly, Apple doesn't want to support OSX as a Unix platform either with dropping X11 since ML.

What devs think don't count because a developer's requirement is on a different planet to the average user. Every single Dev tool you mentioned has equivalents on nearly any platform.

Hey, I like Amigados but I wouldn't wish the Guru Meditation on anyone!

warboat
warboat

@tfg56 @warboat 

Any x86 can run Win8 with 2GB RAM very well. The only limiting factor is the PCU must be PAE enable.

I have a 10yo desktop machine running Win8!

I was even running Win8 CP and RP on an Atom powered netbook with 2gb RAM for about a year. I was using it daily to see how WIn8 was like as a daily OS and I ended up using it as my goto laptop for everything except heavy duty applications like video editing. It was rock solid stable and woke from standby and hibernation faster than any other windows version. I had it running for months without rebooting. Just closed the lid and suspend and auto hibernate. I was mainly using only the desktop aspect of Win8 and it worked better than Windows 7 in many ways. Definitely used less memory than Windows 7 which it came with running on only 1gb.


BTW, what the hell is "solid state RAM"?

is there non-solid-state RAM?

warboat
warboat

@cpguru21  

backing up windows has been a piece of cake since Vista with the backup options that come with Windows.

The reason Mac users generally backup is because of issues with the susceptible HFS file system busting its indexing occasionally and losing stuff mysteriously. Additionally, Apple decided to stuff around with how SAVE AS worked so now Time Machine versioning is often needed as a safety net in case you ruin work with SAVE AS.

Windows can easily do all the automatic backup you need if anyone bothered to spend a couple of minutes setting it up just like they do with OSX. It just happens to be more of a habit with OSX due to the susceptibility rather than any inherent difficulty.

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