Microsoft

What?s the best way to transfer files between two non-networked computers?

TechRepublic passport owner Papalazer entered our PC Troubleshooting forum and posted a question about transferring files. Fellow TechRepublic readers provided an elegant solution.


Here’s a dilemma support professionals face all the time: You’ve got two non-networked computers, and you want to get all the files off one and onto the other. Do you crack open the case, remove one of the hard drives, and install it as a second drive on the other machine? Here’s what your fellow TechRepublic readers had to say.

Papalazer asked for help and got it
TechRepublic passport owner Papalazer posted this question, with a value of 150 TechPoints, in the PC Support section of the Support forums: “How can I safely transfer any files from one computer to another via modem, using Windows 95 for both? Is it possible—if one computer is formatted and using maybe a terminal program in DOS—to accept Windows 95 from another computer? Is it also safe to use direct cable between both, using a ‘null modem’ for transfers? I would like to get files from one Windows 95 computer to another Windows 95/98 system using the safest, quickest, and easiest method available.”

Here’s one of the suggestions offered by fellow TechRepublic readers:

Use LapLink 3. Connect a cable to each printer port and run ll3.exe on each machine. Then copy any or all files from one to the other. It is much quicker than via modem and very reliable. You can buy LapLink for around $150 fromTraveling Software Inc. Make sure that you use a "laplink cable." Not sure what wires are switched, but it is not your typical parallel cable. You can get one anywhere for around $5.

Read the entire thread
Other TechRepublic readers posted completely different solutions, any one of which may work for you, depending on the equipment and budget you have at your disposal. To read the details of the answers proposed by your fellow TechRepublic readers, follow this link and read the entire forum thread .

Earn those TechPoints
You earn TechPoints whenever you use the TechRepublic site. To find out how many TechPoints you have, click the My TechPoints link in our left nav bar.

 

Here’s a dilemma support professionals face all the time: You’ve got two non-networked computers, and you want to get all the files off one and onto the other. Do you crack open the case, remove one of the hard drives, and install it as a second drive on the other machine? Here’s what your fellow TechRepublic readers had to say.

Papalazer asked for help and got it
TechRepublic passport owner Papalazer posted this question, with a value of 150 TechPoints, in the PC Support section of the Support forums: “How can I safely transfer any files from one computer to another via modem, using Windows 95 for both? Is it possible—if one computer is formatted and using maybe a terminal program in DOS—to accept Windows 95 from another computer? Is it also safe to use direct cable between both, using a ‘null modem’ for transfers? I would like to get files from one Windows 95 computer to another Windows 95/98 system using the safest, quickest, and easiest method available.”

Here’s one of the suggestions offered by fellow TechRepublic readers:

Use LapLink 3. Connect a cable to each printer port and run ll3.exe on each machine. Then copy any or all files from one to the other. It is much quicker than via modem and very reliable. You can buy LapLink for around $150 fromTraveling Software Inc. Make sure that you use a "laplink cable." Not sure what wires are switched, but it is not your typical parallel cable. You can get one anywhere for around $5.

Read the entire thread
Other TechRepublic readers posted completely different solutions, any one of which may work for you, depending on the equipment and budget you have at your disposal. To read the details of the answers proposed by your fellow TechRepublic readers, follow this link and read the entire forum thread .

Earn those TechPoints
You earn TechPoints whenever you use the TechRepublic site. To find out how many TechPoints you have, click the My TechPoints link in our left nav bar.

 

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