Microsoft

Windows 2000: Shortcut keys and dual-CPUs

Find out how to build a shortcut to clear your desktop in one click and how to configure a Windows 2000 system for dual-CPU use with these quick tips from the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail.


Are you looking for a simple and convenient way to learn more about Windows 2000 Professional? We’ve got the answer with our Windows 2000 Professional TechMail, which contains valuable information that can save you time and effort. Below, you’ll find an example of what the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail has to offer. Get valuable tips, links to Windows resources, and much more, all delivered straight to your inbox—absolutely free. Sign up for the Windows 2000 TechMail today!

Assign a shortcut key to show the desktop
Windows 2000, Windows NT, and Windows 9x all include a Show Desktop icon on the Quick Launch toolbar that when clicked minimizes all applications and shows the desktop. Show Desktop is actually a script named Show Desktop.scf, located in your Quick Launch folder. You can view the contents of the script by dragging the file into Notepad or opening the file from Notepad.

Show Desktop is handy when you want to view the desktop but don't want to minimize the half dozen applications currently running. Clicking the icon on the Quick Launch toolbar is easy enough, but maybe you'd prefer a keyboard shortcut to it. Here's how to create one:
  1. Click Show Desktop to minimize all applications.
  2. Right-drag the Show Desktop icon to the desktop and click Create Shortcut(s) Here.
  3. Right-click the shortcut and choose Properties.
  4. Click in the Shortcut Key field and press the shortcut key combination you want to use to activate the Show Desktop script and then click OK.

Now you can restore your applications and press the shortcut key combination to test it. All of your applications should minimize.

Configure a dual-CPU system without Uptomp.exe
Perhaps you purchased a dual-CPU system that contained a single CPU, giving yourself a future upgrade path. When you installed Windows 2000, you installed the single-CPU kernel, which means that Windows 2000 won't recognize or use the other CPU, even after you install it. You could reinstall Windows 2000, but that's the long way to go.

On Windows NT systems, you can use a utility called Uptomp.exe—included with the Windows NT Resource Kit—to upgrade the system from a single-CPU system to a multi-CPU system. The Windows 2000 Resource Kit doesn't include Uptomp.exe, but that's not a problem because you can use the Device Manager to enable support for your second CPU. Here's how:

First, shut down the system and install the second CPU. Then, restart the system and open the Device Manager. Expand the Computer branch and note the system type specified. Double-click the computer type in the Computer branch to open its properties and then click the Drivers tab. Click Update Driver and then click Next. Select Display A List Of Known Drivers For This Device and then choose Show All Hardware Of This Device Class. Select the appropriate multi-CPU kernel, click Next, and click Finish. Restart the system for the change to take effect.

One of the quickest ways to verify that your system is using both processors is to press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete], open the Task Manager, and click the Performance tab. You should see two CPU indicators on the page.

Get great Windows 2000 tips like these sent directly to your inbox!
If you would like to read more Windows 2000 tips, sign up for the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article by sending us an e-mail or by posting a comment below.

 

Are you looking for a simple and convenient way to learn more about Windows 2000 Professional? We’ve got the answer with our Windows 2000 Professional TechMail, which contains valuable information that can save you time and effort. Below, you’ll find an example of what the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail has to offer. Get valuable tips, links to Windows resources, and much more, all delivered straight to your inbox—absolutely free. Sign up for the Windows 2000 TechMail today!

Assign a shortcut key to show the desktop
Windows 2000, Windows NT, and Windows 9x all include a Show Desktop icon on the Quick Launch toolbar that when clicked minimizes all applications and shows the desktop. Show Desktop is actually a script named Show Desktop.scf, located in your Quick Launch folder. You can view the contents of the script by dragging the file into Notepad or opening the file from Notepad.

Show Desktop is handy when you want to view the desktop but don't want to minimize the half dozen applications currently running. Clicking the icon on the Quick Launch toolbar is easy enough, but maybe you'd prefer a keyboard shortcut to it. Here's how to create one:
  1. Click Show Desktop to minimize all applications.
  2. Right-drag the Show Desktop icon to the desktop and click Create Shortcut(s) Here.
  3. Right-click the shortcut and choose Properties.
  4. Click in the Shortcut Key field and press the shortcut key combination you want to use to activate the Show Desktop script and then click OK.

Now you can restore your applications and press the shortcut key combination to test it. All of your applications should minimize.

Configure a dual-CPU system without Uptomp.exe
Perhaps you purchased a dual-CPU system that contained a single CPU, giving yourself a future upgrade path. When you installed Windows 2000, you installed the single-CPU kernel, which means that Windows 2000 won't recognize or use the other CPU, even after you install it. You could reinstall Windows 2000, but that's the long way to go.

On Windows NT systems, you can use a utility called Uptomp.exe—included with the Windows NT Resource Kit—to upgrade the system from a single-CPU system to a multi-CPU system. The Windows 2000 Resource Kit doesn't include Uptomp.exe, but that's not a problem because you can use the Device Manager to enable support for your second CPU. Here's how:

First, shut down the system and install the second CPU. Then, restart the system and open the Device Manager. Expand the Computer branch and note the system type specified. Double-click the computer type in the Computer branch to open its properties and then click the Drivers tab. Click Update Driver and then click Next. Select Display A List Of Known Drivers For This Device and then choose Show All Hardware Of This Device Class. Select the appropriate multi-CPU kernel, click Next, and click Finish. Restart the system for the change to take effect.

One of the quickest ways to verify that your system is using both processors is to press [Ctrl][Alt][Delete], open the Task Manager, and click the Performance tab. You should see two CPU indicators on the page.

Get great Windows 2000 tips like these sent directly to your inbox!
If you would like to read more Windows 2000 tips, sign up for the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article by sending us an e-mail or by posting a comment below.

 

About

Bill Detwiler is Managing Editor of TechRepublic and Tech Pro Research and the host of Cracking Open, CNET and TechRepublic's popular online show. Prior to joining TechRepublic in 2000, Bill was an IT manager, database administrator, and desktop supp...

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