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Windows 2000 tips for the FTP console and the Pathping command

Let us help you become a Windows 2000 pro. Find out how to transfer multiple files through the Windows 2000 FTP console and troubleshoot TCP/IP problems with the Pathping command.


This week's Windows 2000 Insider column offers two tips to help you get more from Windows 2000. Find out how to transfer multiple files through the FTP console and use the Pathping command to troubleshoot TCP/IP.

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Get multiple files with an FTP console
If you do a lot of FTP file transfers—particularly of multiple files in a session—you might find the Windows 2000 FTP console to be a useful tool. While there are a number of GUI-based FTP tools on the market as shareware and commercial software, Windows 2000's FTP console is free and requires relatively little experience.

One of the FTP console's many benefits is its ability to download multiple files with a single command. For example, assume you need to retrieve all of the files in a specific remote FTP folder; you can do that using the FTP MGET command. Here's how!

First, open a command console and type
FTP

to start the FTP console. Use the OPEN command to connect to the server and type the CD command to navigate to the desired directory. If you're transferring binary files, issue the BIN command to set the transfer mode. Then, use the LCD command to specify to the local directory which files will be downloaded. And last, issue the command
MGET string

where string specifies the files to retrieve. If you want to get all of the files, use the command
MGET *.*

Use Pathping to troubleshoot TCP/IP
If you've had to troubleshoot TCP/IP connections in Windows 2000, you're probably familiar with the Ping and Tracert commands. The Ping command sends an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) packet to a host and waits for a return packet, listing the transit time. If there isn't a return packet, Ping indicates that with a Request Time Out message. The Tracert command traces the route between two hosts and can be useful in determining where in the route a communications problem is occurring.

New with Windows 2000 is the Pathping command, which combines the features of Ping and Tracert and adds additional features to help you troubleshoot TCP/IP connectivity problems. Pathping sends packets to each router between two hosts and displays a report based on the return packets it receives. This report is useful in determining which routers in the path are experiencing problems. Good indicators of the router experiencing the problem are the Lost/Sent columns. When a particular router sustains a high loss percentage rate, that's a reasonable indicator that there's a problem with that specific router.

To view the syntax for Pathping, type
PATHPING /?

at the command prompt. NOTE: There is no -r switch; however, there is an -R switch (uppercase) that tests to determine if each hop is RSVP-aware. Also, the -t switch should be -T (uppercase).

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If you would like to read more Windows 2000 tips, sign up for the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article by sending us an e-mail or by posting a comment below.

 

This week's Windows 2000 Insider column offers two tips to help you get more from Windows 2000. Find out how to transfer multiple files through the FTP console and use the Pathping command to troubleshoot TCP/IP.

Sign up for the Windows 2000 TechMail
Our Windows 2000 Professional TechMail contains valuable information that can save you time and effort. Get valuable tips, links to Windows resources, and much more, all delivered straight to your inbox—absolutely free. Sign up for the Windows 2000 TechMail today!

Get multiple files with an FTP console
If you do a lot of FTP file transfers—particularly of multiple files in a session—you might find the Windows 2000 FTP console to be a useful tool. While there are a number of GUI-based FTP tools on the market as shareware and commercial software, Windows 2000's FTP console is free and requires relatively little experience.

One of the FTP console's many benefits is its ability to download multiple files with a single command. For example, assume you need to retrieve all of the files in a specific remote FTP folder; you can do that using the FTP MGET command. Here's how!

First, open a command console and type
FTP

to start the FTP console. Use the OPEN command to connect to the server and type the CD command to navigate to the desired directory. If you're transferring binary files, issue the BIN command to set the transfer mode. Then, use the LCD command to specify to the local directory which files will be downloaded. And last, issue the command
MGET string

where string specifies the files to retrieve. If you want to get all of the files, use the command
MGET *.*

Use Pathping to troubleshoot TCP/IP
If you've had to troubleshoot TCP/IP connections in Windows 2000, you're probably familiar with the Ping and Tracert commands. The Ping command sends an Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) packet to a host and waits for a return packet, listing the transit time. If there isn't a return packet, Ping indicates that with a Request Time Out message. The Tracert command traces the route between two hosts and can be useful in determining where in the route a communications problem is occurring.

New with Windows 2000 is the Pathping command, which combines the features of Ping and Tracert and adds additional features to help you troubleshoot TCP/IP connectivity problems. Pathping sends packets to each router between two hosts and displays a report based on the return packets it receives. This report is useful in determining which routers in the path are experiencing problems. Good indicators of the router experiencing the problem are the Lost/Sent columns. When a particular router sustains a high loss percentage rate, that's a reasonable indicator that there's a problem with that specific router.

To view the syntax for Pathping, type
PATHPING /?

at the command prompt. NOTE: There is no -r switch; however, there is an -R switch (uppercase) that tests to determine if each hop is RSVP-aware. Also, the -t switch should be -T (uppercase).

Get great Windows 2000 tips like these sent directly to your inbox!
If you would like to read more Windows 2000 tips, sign up for the Windows 2000 Professional TechMail. Let us know what you think about this article by sending us an e-mail or by posting a comment below.

 

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