Tech & Work

Women in tech: 20 stories of women doing big things with their tech skills

Celebrating the accomplishments of women in tech isn't just for International Women's Day.

You might have noticed it's International Women's Day. In fact, the month of March is Women's History Month, and publications are busy putting together posts about myriad women's issues.

There's plenty to talk about, ranging from the amount of money women make and the positions they're hired for, to how they're educated, and the kind of health care they receive, even the way they're taxed for tampons. It's good to talk about serious issues affecting various segments of the population.

If all this rubs you the wrong way — sorry not sorry, but there's a lot about gender equality that's pretty messed up, including the idea that we can make good as a society one day or month a year. Is it positive to have a day about women to raise awareness about their achievements and struggles? Yes. Would it be better to treat people with equality the rest of the year? You bet.

Here's a roundup of some — not all — of our favorite profile pieces on women in tech who are knocking down stereotypes year-round.


Natalie Panek: Rocket scientist. Women in STEM advocate. Pilot. Aspiring astronaut.

We have all the faith that Panek is going to get a seat aboard a space mission one day. In the meantime, she's encouraging girls to get interested in STEM.


Aliya Rahman: Former Code for Progress Director. Tech and social justice activist. Martial artist.

Rahman uses her tech skills to fight for social justice, and helps others learn those skills so they can better their lives.


Halle Tecco: Digital Health Pioneer. Angel Investor. Social Activist.

Tecco co-founded a startup accelerator focusing on digital health companies.


Hilary Mason: Fast Forward Labs CEO. One-time aspiring taxi driver. Your nerd best friend.

Mason knows how to take data and make useful products from it. She even created a startup based on that practice.


Nonny de la Peña: Journalist. Virtual reality pioneer. Occasional painter.

De la Peña is known as the godmother of virtual reality. She's also a trailblazer, being the first to start experimenting with journalism and VR.


Jenny Lee: Venture capital investor. Golfer. Fighter jet engineer.

Lee is one of the top female venture capital investors in the world and has an incredible grasp on both the American and Chinese markets.


GE's Katrina Craigwell: Head of global digital programming. Instagram proponent. TV fan.

General Electric greatly benefits from Craigwell's endless creativity with digital media.


Morgan Berman: My MilkCrate founder. CEO. Women's rights activist.

Berman uses tech to forge a connection between local residents in Philadelphia and sustainable businesses.


'Miss Destructo': CMO. Storyteller. Networker. Former Yam.

Amber Osborne, better known as Miss Destructo, is a testament to non-traditional career-paths and the value of learning from others.


Diana Trujillo: NASA Jet Propulsion Lab engineer. Mars Curiosity team member. First-time dog owner.

As a small child in Cali, Colombia, Diana Trujillo dreamed of space. Years later, she's at NASA's Jet Propulsion Lab working on the Mars Curiosity Rover.


Brit Fitzpatrick: Mentor. Women in tech advocate. Miss Kentucky 2015.

Mentorship means a lot to Brit Fitzpatrick, so she made an app to make it easier for nonprofits to facilitate.


Julia Hu: Lark founder. Digital health maven. Hip-hop dancer.

Hu's app Lark turns your smartphone into a personal fitness trainer.


Divya Jain: Machine learning maven. Startup founder. Women in tech advocate.

Jain is driving forward much of the machine learning efforts at enterprise cloud storage company Box.


Reshma Saujani: Movement-starter to rebalance women in technology.

Saujani founded nonprofit Girls Who Code. Forbes also named her one of their Most Powerful Women Changing the World.


Ruthe Farmer: NCWIT strategist. Computer science advocate. Tech Dumbledore.

You'll find Farmer at the National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) on a mission to get girls into STEM.


Yasmine Mustafa: ROAR for Good CEO. Wearable creator. Stargazer.

Mustafa is the founder of ROAR for Good, a wearable for women's self defense.


Maria Klawe: Esteemed Computer Scientist. Proud mathematician. Watercolor painter.

Klawe's career in computer science spans decades. Now she's the first female president at Harvey Mudd College and has raised the numbers of women there from 31% to 47%.

Samuel Stuart

Anu Duggal: F Cubed Founder. Seasoned entrepreneur. French cook.

Duggal founded F Cubed, a VC fund for women founders.


Kathy Button Bell: CMO. Moment Marketer. Big Picture Person. Athlete.

Emerson Electric's CMO Kathy Button Bell finds inspiration for marketing campaigns in the simple and delightful.


Ayanna Howard: Robotics Researcher. Educator. Bionic Woman.

Howard has a long and awesome history with robots. Now, she makes them for pediatric therapy programs.

Also see


Erin Carson is a Staff Reporter for CNET and a former Multimedia Editor for TechRepublic.

Editor's Picks

Free Newsletters, In your Inbox