Google

XP replacement? $179 ASUS Chromebox is 'most powerful Chrome device to date'

The new ASUS Chromebox is being praised by Google and costs less than $200. Could it be a step toward enterprise adoption for Chrome devices?
 
ASUSCB
The ASUS Chromebox
 Image: ASUS

Google Chromebooks have seen their success in the education market, but Chrome devices still haven't been able to grab a sizable market share in the enterprise. With the death of XP looming, Chrome devices offer a low-cost alternative for companies looking to transition off old Windows XP machines but are worried about the cost and complexity of upgrading to Windows 8.  

Today ASUS unveiled their Chromebox, a $179 desktop version of the Chromebook. Felix Lin, Director of Product Management at Google, called it, "the most compact and powerful Chrome device to date."

The Chromebox is account-based like the Chromebook and users get access to 100GB of Google Drive space. The box has a small SSD and access to four USB 3.0 ports, Bluetooth 4.0, an SD card reader, and it comes with integrated malware and virus protection. At 4.88" x4.88" it is only slightly larger than an Apple TV and can be mounted behind a compatible display using a Vesa mount.

"We firmly believe the ASUS Chromebox addresses the need for an extremely cost effective computing solution in the education, small and medium-sized business and home markets," according to Gary Key, Senior Press Relations manager for ASUS.

With the impending drop of Microsoft support for XP, many firms are looking for a way out. The question is whether or not many organizations in the enterprise space are ready to make the leap to web-based applications. Options like the Citrix Receiver have been available for years and have provided a means for employees to access Windows desktops and applications through devices like iPads and Chromebooks. Last year in a blog post, Citrix even said they were "committed to the Chromebook device."

ASUSCBback.jpg
The ASUS Chromebox has a small SSD and access to four USB 3.0 ports.
 Image: ASUS
 Despite these options, some analysts do not feel that the enterprise is entirely ready to move to the cloud. Steve Kleynhans, Vice President of Mobile and Client Computing Group at Gartner said that clients with a legacy of Windows applications won't see a device like Chromebox as a better option.

"The Chromebox (or Chromebooks) are well suited to organizations who have a 'green field' of new web-based applications and don’t have to deal with any legacy of Windows applications," Kleynhans said. "That describes a relatively small group of companies, most of whom are themselves quite small.  While the long-term trend is moving towards web-based applications, (a space where Chromebooks/boxes do quite well), most organizations still have a large collection of Windows applications or Windows-dependent applications to deal with. For those organizations, the Chromebox is just another thin client; no better than the existing options from vendors who are better positioned for enterprises (Dell/Wyse, HP)."

Kleynhans mentioned that enterprises have had these remote options for 15 or so years. The use of options like the Citrix Receiver and Microsoft's Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) has seen steady growth, however, Kleynhans noted, " it is seldom used to completely replace local execution of Windows applications and requires an investment in the data center that some companies aren’t prepared to make."

Regardless of what option a company chooses when they move on from XP, there will be a culture shift involved. Windows 8 has established itself as an alien entity to regular Windows users. Windows 7 is a more familiar option and would come with an easier transition for companies that wanted to stick with a Windows product. Chrome devices are often low-cost and have the potential to increase collaboration, but they force businesses into the cloud—still an uncharted and misunderstood territory for many companies.

Only time will tell what will replace Windows XP in the 37% of organizations that still don't plan to replace all of their XP machines by April 8, 2014 when official Microsoft support ends.

What do you think?

We want to know your take on this issue. Does Chrome have a place in the enterprise? What do you think is the best option for companies leaving XP?

Also see

About

Conner Forrest is a Staff Writer for TechRepublic. He covers Google and startups and is passionate about the convergence of technology and culture.

95 comments
markhu2
markhu2

I pre-ordered one of these and received it a few weeks ago.  It is pretty impressive: boots very quickly, responsive UI and video, good-looking fonts, does Google Hangouts seamlessly.  To me it is a completely viable alternative in many situations compared to a Windows box or a Mac Mini, at a fraction of the price.

This is my first Chrome-OS device and my experience is so good, I'm seriously considering a ChromeBook next.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Chromebooks is primarily for geeks and those who need it in a place like a call center.

Like others, Chromebooks run on the Chrome browser as a desktop. Chrome browser is notorious to have many vulnerabilities - worse than IE, Opera, etc... except maybe Safari. [See Symantec security report on this.]

Why on earth have a display port? I haven't seen many monitors that have one. Could of saved a few bucks by not including it. Since it could be used in a call center [where they want to reduce costs by using "recycled" equipment], a VGA port would of been more useful. Also why 4 USB ports? A port for a keyboard and one for the mouse is sufficient. You don't want [certain] users to plug in a USB key. Do you even want to install a printer?

djlemas
djlemas

please if your system in up to speed just spend the $100 buck and just jump to windows 7, it will run all your apps with little problem it's a well built OS and will run on most hard ware I see a lot of computers showing up in thrift store that are just great, I run windows 7 on them just for the fun of it ,I got a little dell 700m with no hard drive or ram, got the drive and ram from ebay and two small parts total $60 buck in all installed windows 7 and I have a great little laptop

MadBunny
MadBunny

"The question is whether or not many organizations in the enterprise space are ready to make the leap to web-based applications"


I don't think that's an issue for most companies.....A lot, if not more than half, have already made the decision for.


The issue in this case - for us - is whether or not Google is a trustworthy, customer service oriented organization.


Going by their behavior over the past year - which has ranged from disingenuous, to lying, to stepping way over the line of professional behavior and wandering into genuine maleficence - the answer is absolutely "NO". 

oldgeekone
oldgeekone

Anyone is still around from when, dummy machines was the it for enterprise computer's, for those of you out there, who were not born yet, that was when the user just hit a key and the monitor would turn on, it was just the monitor, everything work off the server, then once the computer's became cheaper, you got upgraded to a very minimal desk top, you still only have access to what you needed, I never understood what was the point of haven the box next to you, if you only had access to the resources you needed and still work off the "main frame"


Then it got old school, and we upgraded to all of this new cool gadget yea!!, and for some reason we are doing a 190 turn, and going back to dummy system's, which is what this box is, is actually useless, without net connection, but it makes complete sense seriously.


It is just enjoying to see, that something I lived already is coming back and still work... just a note down the memory lane..


I love this.. tech stuff.. yes I'm old but once a geek always a geek

good day you all.

AGLN22
AGLN22

The Chromebox is ideal for scenarios like call centers.  Like the Chromebook, Chromeboxes start up fast and are easy to manage and use.

There are also solutions that make Chromeboxes more relevant to the enterprise by allowing users to access Windows and corporate applications.  Ericom's AccessNow HTML5 RDP solution enables Chromebox users to connect to any RDP host, including virtual desktops and Terminal Server, and run their Windows applications and desktops in the Chrome browser tab.

There's nothing to install on the Chromebox, as AccessNow runs within the Chrome browser, which reduces hassles for IT.  The user simply connects to the URL given him by the IT admin, logs in and then connects to their applications or virtual desktop.

For an online demo, open your Chrome browser and visit:
http://www.ericom.com/demo_AccessNow.asp?URL_ID=708

Please note that I work for Ericom.

333239
333239

Let me get this straight, you are proposing that a Windows XP device should be replaced by a device that cannot run your existing Windows  applications, and that somehow this is better than one that can, e.g. Windows 8.1. Then there's all the server stuff too. Really?


BTW for those Windows 8 haters, it is becoming more like 7 on every release/update, so think hard before dropping it.

CaptSunset
CaptSunset

All wi-fi is not created equal; outside urban centers, and especially for critical services like medicine and financial services like checkout, Chromebooks & boxes own reputation will depend on that of the weakest link- cost-cutting American ISPs.

jasongw
jasongw

Central questions for any device that hopes to make it into the enterprise:


1. Can it be centrally managed by IT staff, even from remote locations?

2. Is it compatible with a broad range of industry standard software and accessories?

3. If the system becomes infected with malware, is there enterprise grade antivirus software that can alert administrative staff immediately?

4. Does it require training for end users? If so, how much?


There are many more considerations besides just price when it comes to deciding whether a device belongs in the enterprise. Chrome OS fails all these checks except perhaps #4, and even that is questionable.

Mark Markman
Mark Markman

Nice try!! It will never make to enterprise...

aboba0
aboba0

"Chrome devices are often low-cost and have the potential to increase collaboration" 


I've read the article and don't see any mention of how Chrome devices and apps are better enablers of collaboration nor do I see any mention of how Windows devices and apps are less capable collaboration tools. 


IMO without additional information that statement is totally unsupported.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Looks like Asus is dumping old hardware. Celeron? Problem with ChromeOS is that it has nothing to be centrally managed. Probably better buying a bunch of these and formatting them and either put on a real Linux distro or maybe even some Win 7 clients [as most enterprises will have a volume license contracts].

morrieg
morrieg

I can't see this as a migration path for XP users, however, I wonder if it would be a smarter "smart TV" choice to access the much larger worldwide network of Internet TV than can be accessed by the simple devices currently on the market?

M Wagner
M Wagner

Two, very different questions:


1)  We want to know your take on this issue. Does Chrome have a place in the enterprise?


No.  The enterprise is not the same thing as your everyday mom & pop business.  The enterprise has to be able to respond to customer needs quickly and easily.  It's workers need to have access to the best tools for the job, regardless of vendor. 


Any business large enough to be called an enterprise needs

to be using a highly scalable operating system with access to a large and varied library of applications from a variety of vendors.  That means Windows, Mac OS X, or Linux.  Period.


The small business needing little more than a suite of personal productivity apps can get by with ChromeOS because, from a browser they can ALSO access Apple's, iCloud, Google's application suite, Microsoft Web Apps, and perhaps others but, since all of these services are accessible from a Windows or Linux environment - as well as a huge library of commercial applications - of what benefit is buying a ChromeBook instead of a Windows (or Linux) compatible x86/x64 platform?


2)  What do you think is the best option for companies leaving XP? 


The "best" choice WAS to start planning a move to Windows 7 in 2009, when the current deadline became public. 


Starting today, the simplest option is Windows 7 because it comes with XP mode which gives the user the best chance of being able to run their favorite legacy Windows XP applications with the least amount of trouble. 


The next best option is to run Windows XP under a VM residing on the OS of their choice because, like XP mode, a VM will isolate Windows XP from the Internet. 


The IDEAL option is to buy Windows Pro 8.1 licenses and, then exercise downgrade rights to run Windows 7 only until the enterprise is ready to transition their operations to Windows 8.1. 


Nevertheless, those who want to transition away from Windows altogether should take the opportunity to evaluate the feasibility of UNIX/Linux as an alternative OS.

rblevin
rblevin

Completely flawed theory. Every enterprise organization has loads of legacy mission-critical applications that require Windows. You can't just swap the device and go. Moreover, what about VPN access? Security? DLP? C'mon. It's one thing to feature a glowing report on a new device. It's another to conjure up a silly leap like this device could replace XP. Every org that has XP is already ready to migrate those users to Windows 7.

mikemce
mikemce

I use two business desktops and a laptop, all on XP. I would like to upgrade to Win 7 or 6 but my hardware would likely be less than ideal. I also have special technical software that may not run on Win 7 or 8 and surely would not work on android, linux or IOS. There is nothing in the cloud that would solve my problem either. Another possibility would be to keep one XP machine running offline and avoid security threats while still being able to work with my old technical software packages. Sooner or later my hardware is going to fail and that will force the issue. Hopefully, by that time there will be new software versions I can use on a more current windows or even another os. As for support, I will have to use third-party support as long as I can.

jrhodin
jrhodin

I would never want to have Google own all my data, but my organization decided it was okay, so for work I am all in (glad I didn't have to make that decision). Dumping Microsoft at work is easy since the Google productivity apps are so similar. I have been experimenting with Chromium OS and find it entirely adequate for real business - not as nice for a hobbyist. As for critical enterprise applications, we are constantly being forced to move to something new as vendors go out of business or decide they no longer want to support our current product. I have to agree that it has always been a huge waste of resources to roll out a new enterprise management database, but have found it to be part of the process.

mikef12
mikef12

To the cloud we go.  And once everything is in the cloud, we'd better be doing a passel of anti-rain dances. 

Atul Deshmukh
Atul Deshmukh

Luis Manuel Antunes: Google & FB hava already intruded in everyone's life..

Atul Deshmukh
Atul Deshmukh

These type of fancy devices have hardly any support after warranty expiration...so i guess better stay away until support is good and local..

timwessels
timwessels

Well, the pundits who were quick to dismiss the Chromebook back in 2011 should be eating their words right about now.  Chromebooks have captured 20 percent of the education market. The SMB market is next for Chromebook and Acer, Asus, Dell, HP, Lenovo, Samsung and Toshiba are building them.  Let's suspend the old argument about everyone's comfort level with legacy Windows apps.  The is the era of cloud computing. Web delivered applications and local browser extensions are now the "normal" way to run applications.  Any app developer who isn't living in a cave is writing apps that run in someone's cloud.  Even Microsoft is all-in on the cloud.  And yes, you can access your legacy Windows apps using a Windows Server running the Remote Desktop Service with or without Citrix XenApp, which is easier and less expensive to implement than VDI.  As for not being connected to the Internet to take advantage of using Chromebooks or Chromebox, just who is using smartphones, tablets, laptops or PCs that have no Internet connectivity?  Windows XP had a great run and was the workhorse  laptop and PC operating system for 13 years.  Microsoft is mercifully putting Windows XP down.  Time to move on and Chromebooks and Chromeboxes might be a good next move for many former Windows XP users who want a low-cost, secure and easy to maintain device that uses the Chrome web browser as its interface.  


Gisabun
Gisabun

@AGLN22 Hmmm. Do you really need something to startup fast in a call center? Most call center run 24 hours a day. So when does it need to shut down.

Just remember. without the Internet, a Chromebook is toast [unless it is accessing something on a local network].

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

@333239


I not only think it is a viable replacement for a large group of users, I've seen it done with excellent results.  I don't think anyone is claiming it's a 100% solution, but the bulk of users really only use or need access to the internet. 

If you can't live without Office then it's not a solution for you, but Google Docs can replace office for the average user. 

If you are a "windows power user" and you can't live with just Chrome and Google apps,....why are you still running XP? 

dragonbite
dragonbite

@333239 For those Windows XP people whose systems have gotten so slow that all they use it for anymore is a browser anyway then this would work great!  Or if they have already moved most of their stuff to online and haven't had to use local applications for anything other than simple, web-based reproducible things (such as email, image editing, listening to music, light documents/spreadsheets/presentations, or using web apps).

For the Windows power user or somebody using specific or heavy applications then no, this isn't a good solution.  For everybody else it probably works just fine.

Gisabun
Gisabun

@jasongw I agree on all of your points. Only thing I could see a Chromebook being useful is in a call center where there is a local web server to handle everything. Set it up to access only local servers and block out the 'Net.

dragonbite
dragonbite

@aboba0 Chromebooks for Education: Simple, secure computers for schools ( http://googleenterprise.blogspot.com/2012/09/chromebooks-for-education-simple-secure.html ).

On my personal note, when I need to collaborate with friends or family on a project I find Google Docs a lot easier to manage it than Office and Office online.  MS Office is improving, but unless I need a lot more power than the browser version offers I find Google Docs to handle real-time collaboration smoothly and efficiently.

My middle-school aged son was collaborating on a presentation with 2 other students using Google Apps for Education with no issues (that I know of).

The Chromebook and Chromebox just provides a means to quickly access these features without a lot of fuss on the administrative side or distractions from just doing it.  It sure makes it easier than setting up logins for everybody in the household on every system.

aflynnhpg
aflynnhpg

@M Wagner


I respectfully disagree with your assessment of what an "enterprise" should use for an OS.  I think it will vary greatly from one enterprise to the next. 

If your in an enterprise system that delivers it's applications via a thin client, a full blown windows operating system is over kill not just from software standpoint, but from a hardware and energy standpoint as well. 

I worked at a large healthcare system that replaced many full blown windows computers with network bootable thin client devices and used Citrix to deliver applications.  They saved enough on electricity the first year to pay for the devices. 

In short, supporting a large number of traditional windows desktops is costly, both in man hours, hardware and other areas.  Thin client solutions like a chrome book can and do make sense in environments in which the applications are delivered either via the web, or via a thin client solution like Citrix. 

Most users do not know the difference. 

In addition it offers flexibility that you can't have via a standard desktop like roaming profiles where a user can simply log out of 1 thin client device and log into another and pick up with the same apps open and running in the exact state they were in on the other device. 

Perhaps your industry experience is different, and certainly not all apps can be delivered via a thin client solution, but you should not over look the cost savings and the level of application control offered from a solution other than fat client desktops simply because you are an "enterprise".

Kevin Loughrey
Kevin Loughrey

@M Wagner  

You're right about the need to do prior preparation well in advance of any migration.  


We started the process of migrating to Linux generally in 1997.  It has been a long and sometimes difficult journey but now all of our office systems and software and many of our associates have made the transition.  Whenever we have a need to run a Windows only app, we do so in a Virtual Box running Windows XP.


I'm not sure I would be as absolute about there being no place for a "Chrome-like" device in an Enterprise.  My experience with a large Enterprise, namely Defence, is that their needs are very specific and therefore limited.  Large enterprises usually have the money (but often lack the intelligence) to acquire non-operating system specific applications.  Regardless of the situation, a Chrome-like device can be useful for workplace recording and then can pass the information onto a larger system over a secure link.

toviej
toviej

@M Wagner  Quite a dinosaur view. The enterprise should be looking for ways to adopt a pure cloud experience so it can save resources for product development and to be more agile. Holding onto Windows and the past is absolutely a money-down-the-drain approach.


Ask yourself what your company's core business strategy and value is. Unless you're a computer manufacturer, your computer assets are not core to your business. The tools they use are in the critical path, but that's where strategic planning comes in — and the best and most appropriate tools aren't all thick apps.


You mention scalable -that's what the web does, and at speed. Classic desktop environment require heavy cost, planning and time, draining valuable company resources.


Desktops should play a part if that's where the tools are, but you have to think wisely about the tools you need and the value you get from them, e.g. spreadsheets don't require you spend $500 for MS Office - maybe a few people need the added value of Excel, but it's few and far between. 


Why not think outside the box?

toviej
toviej

@rblevin  Nice 1990s mindset. I'm sure you're working hard to save your company many and improve security. How much are you spending on an infrastructure for Windows to be in your environment? Um, Google is a small fraction of that cost. Wake up.

toviej
toviej

@rblevin  Nice 1990s mindset. I'm sure you're working hard to save your company many and improve security. How much are you spending on an infrastructure for Windows to be in your environment? Um, Google is a small fraction of that cost. Wake up...

Gisabun
Gisabun

@mikemce You can try VMware Player or others. Mostly free. Don't need to go from Win 7 HPrem to Pro. [Just a reminder: To use Win XP in a VM you must have a retail or volume license and not OEM. You can't P2V an OEM license either. In that case Win 7 Pro with XP Mode could be of use since the XP license is included.]

Kevin Loughrey
Kevin Loughrey

@mikemce  Mike, you might like to consider running Ubuntu Linux then download Virtual Box from Oracle and install your Windows XP within that.  You can run all of your specialist applications on Win XP and use Ubuntu for everything else.  Anyone who can maintain Linux can easily comprehend Windows XP.


As for support and vulnerabilities, just about all of the faults in WinXP have been discovered and almost all of them have been remedied or worked-around.  There is very little support needed unless you change what you are doing.


Something to think about.

Gisabun
Gisabun

So why are you signing in from Facebook then?

Gisabun
Gisabun

@timwessels 20% of the education market? Big woopie. That would be useful in say elementary schools but as the student gets higher, s/he needs to use "standard" applications such as Office, Photoshop, and others as that is what they will use in the next level of school and later at work. What does Chromebook offer them except web based access? Learn how to surf the Internet?

M Wagner
M Wagner

@timwessels  K-12 is overwhelmingly Apple iPad, Macintosh, or Windows.  Higher education is overwhelmingly Windows. 


The cloud is the future but ChromeOS is not the answer.

cbeckers
cbeckers

@timwessels  You have no idea what you are talking about, when it comes to low-budget non-profits.  Not everyone works in a glass-enclosed high-rise office building; some of us work in a hundred year-old one-story, wood building heated by a potbelly coal stove (literally) and deal with people who would be most comfortable with a coal-fired steam locomotive.  You assume a level of proficiency with "smartphones, tablets, laptops [and] PCs" that is not universal.  We know cloud computing is the coolest thing going now, but not everyone lives in that world...even here in the USA.  I'm not sure that I could get them to adopt internet services, even if someone would provide free internet access.  If you think otherwise, I invite you to volunteer your time to drag them up to the desired level of coolness; let me know when you are available.

Gisabun
Gisabun

@toviej @M Wagner can see between the words that you are a Linux fan. Just because someone runs Windows means they run Office. I know some who use Windows but will use OpenOffice or others. In addition, if the individual needs Excel, it can be bought as a stand-alone application [something like $130].

"Heavy costs, planning and time". I do agree with panning and time to a point but I don't agree on costs. A basic Windows network can consist of just Windows that came with the system or Windows Pro with a server for as larger environment. Then use something with low management requirements such as Office 365 or Google Docs for the remainder.

Maybe your view is dinosaur. Ever managed a Windows environment?

jasongw
jasongw

@toviej @M Wagner No, his view isn't "dinosaur" at all. It's realistic and well grounded in fact.


Windows is, whether you like it or not, the single most capable, well understood operating system on the market, and that's true whether you're an end user or an IT pro. I've been a systems engineer for 17 years. I've been on the Windows hate bandwagon (hell, I was a Windows 95 *beta tester* when I was in school for network and OS training :), I remember everyone loathing the Start Menu upon its release, and I remember thinking, alongside many of my contemporaries, that Linux would displace Windows in a matter of years. Fast forward 19 years to 2014 and Linux is no closer, Chrome is even further away than is Linux, and Windows is now capable of running on more devices in more form factors than ever before.


The cloud, without a doubt, IS the future hub of information management. And right now, no OS does a better job of putting a foot both in the legacy world--which is important, because change does not happen overnight--and in the cloud with SkyDrive/OneDrive. On this, Microsoft is ahead of everyone by YEARS.

toviej
toviej

@M Wagner  Also should mention, Chrome OS is a Linux variant

Gisabun
Gisabun

 @toviej You and your "1990s mindset" or "dinosaur view" comments. Maybe you are in the 1990s.

jasongw
jasongw

@toviej @rblevin You have no idea what you're talking about. Windows has literally thousands of mature, cost effective tools for enterprise management, many of them built right into the operating system for no extra charge. Google's offerings are in no way enterprise grade. Indeed, many of them aren't even up to snuff for anything more than a small to medium sized business, and none of them can fully replace Windows or its software, from Office to CAD to Adobe Creative Suite--I could make a list all day long.


Google does not have the capability to replace Microsoft, simple as that.

Gisabun
Gisabun

@toviej @rblevin "A small fraction"? I'd like to see numbers when back that up. Maybe you're just a very pro-Google fan. You think no company has legacy applications? Tell that to companies with mission critical applications. I know of one company with at least 3 Windows Server 2000 [yes 2000] servers. Have you ever worked in an enterprise level company [i.e. greater than 500 employees]?

LouDamelin1
LouDamelin1

@Kevin Loughrey @mikemceThe bios would have to support virtualization.  Most old machines running XP do not have bios capable of supporting virtual machines.  It's possible to do what you suggest, but a new computer has to bought.  Instead of Ubunto, why not Robilinux which offers paid support?

toviej
toviej

@M Wagner As apps go to the cloud why do you need a thick desktop? What value does that give you?

toviej
toviej

@cbeckers @timwessels  That coolness includes serious cost reductions. I'm sure your non-profits would be excited about that. Try, don't cry.

jasongw
jasongw

@Gisabun @toviej@rblevin I have, and you, Gisabun, are absolutely correct. Indeed, up until a few months ago, I had a client who still had a mission critical piece of software running on Windows NT4. Guess what the new version of that software runs on. Windows Server 2012, and nothing else.

Gisabun
Gisabun

@toviej Name some major applications that are just in the cloud and name the hundreds that are not. What happens when there is an Internet crash? It has happened.

jasongw
jasongw

@toviej You might have missed the transition: full PC's are no longer "thick desktops". I own a Surface Pro that'll run circles around any Chrome OS device you can find, run every cloud app out there AND still run all the legacy non-cloud apps.


As a side system, I have a 12 ounce Windows 8 tablet on a quad core ARM processor that gets 10 hours of battery life, is blazing fast and cost just $200. I get all the benefits of cloud, Office 2013 for no extra charge, and I can run legacy apps to boot. Moreover, either of my devices can play laptop or tablet mode.


You were saying?

Gisabun
Gisabun

@toviej Errrr. Higher education needs more than "cloud" applications. Every field has specialized applications that can never run in the cloud.

cpguru21
cpguru21

@toviej @cbeckers @timwessels  You mean like non-profits that rely on donations?  Like free computer systems etc..?  You are going to save them money by moving them to the cloud?


"Try, don't cry" smug much?  I think cbeckers makes a valid point.  


We are not a non-profit but still deal with a lot of folks who don't own a "smart phone" let alone a computer at home.  That group is indeed growing smaller and smaller, however they are still here now.