Windows 8

10 hurdles Windows 8 must clear to succeed

Microsoft has launched the Windows 8 Release Preview and is shooting for RTM in two months. But Justin James foresees some major obstacles in the path of the OS.

When Windows 7 launched, it was a huge success for Microsoft. Its biggest challenges were the lingering anger around Vista and the satisfaction with XP. Windows 8 is being launched into a totally different set of market conditions and with the ambitious goal of unifying all form factors onto one operating system. Here are 10 challenges Windows 8 will need to conquer to be a success.

1: The Metro UI

Make no mistake about it: An awful lot of people are pretty unhappy with Metro. From my use of Metro on a Windows 8 VM and a Windows Phone 7 device for more than a year, I can tell you that there is a night-and-day difference between Metro on a desktop and Metro on a touch screen. Not only is Metro really different from the traditional Windows UI, but even in the Consumer Preview, it feels like the mouse is a second-class citizen to touch. Unless Microsoft can get this right, a lot of first impressions of Metro will be bad.

2: PC OEMs -- can they finally get tablets right?

Microsoft's fate is closely tied to the ability of its partners to get things right. The problem is, Windows 8 is as much (if not more so) of an OS for mobile form factors with touch UIs (tablets, smartphones) as it is for desktops and laptops. And this is the exact market that PC OEMs have proven bad at penetrating for around 10 years now. Sure, there have been some successes (like the iPaq line of PDAs). But there have been many more instances where the PC OEMs just could not figure out how to give customers what they wanted.

3: iPad, iPhones, and Android

Windows 8 on tablets is going head-to-head with the well-established iPad. In fact, the iPad is so dominant in tablets Android can't get much traction at all, despite its success in phones. All the same, Microsoft is trying to push Windows 8 tablets. On the phone front, WP7 has been facing a huge uphill battle against iPhone and Android, despite much critical acclaim and a vocal and enthusiastic user base. Windows 8 on a phone will not be much different from WP7 to most users. If WP7 has been having it tough, Windows 8 is not likely to do much better in phones. Windows 8 for mobile form factors feels like a solution in search of a problem for many users.

4: Distrust of cloud

Windows 8 leverages cloud technologies in a great many ways, and it makes the OS easy to use. It's pretty slick to sign into a brand new Windows 8 install and have all your contacts there, Facebook integration, etc. At the same time, this integration will raise all sorts of red flags to corporate IT departments, which will want to either cripple the devices or take a wait-and-see approach to moving to Windows 8, looking for folks to show exactly what data goes where and how... and how to stop it.

5: No Active Directory support on ARM

Windows 8's big market advantage should be that it can allow tablets and phones to work as a seamless part of Active Directory, but this is not supported on ARM architecture. While Microsoft is giving corporate IT admins ways of managing Windows 8 devices, IT departments tend to prefer consolidation, not proliferation of management tools. Microsoft is going to have to work hard to prove to IT departments that they do not need Active Directory integration for ARM devices.

6: Brand new app market

The only way -- other than developers testing -- to get Windows 8-native applications (Metro applications) is through the app store. The question is, "Will the app store launch with a good number of apps?" Microsoft really surprised me with how many apps WP7 launched with, and it has been even more aggressive about getting apps into the Windows 8 app market early. And anything it can do to allow an easy port of WP7 apps to Windows 8 will be a huge help, especially if it is "no work required," since the WP7 app store is around the 100,000 app mark at the time of this writing.

7: Microsoft Office

Microsoft has been taking steps to bring Office to other platforms (notably iOS), and when it does, that will reduce Windows lock-in quite a bit. It is also working hard to expand its Web reach with Office. Add it up, and users' biggest reason to need Windows goes away, unless they depend on plug-ins that won't work on other platforms.

8: The economy

The economy still stinks. A large part of getting a new OS into the market depends on people buying PCs, and a lot of folks are choosing to do without a new computer because of the cost.

9: Longer refresh cycles

While computers keep getting faster, most applications are not getting more demanding. It used to be that you needed to be on the cutting edge of hardware to keep up with software, but no more. Now, even budget hardware from years ago is still more than adequate to run most applications. That means that the refresh cycle that used to be three years is being stretched to four, five, and beyond. To make it worse, the companies that skipped Vista are now moving (or recently moved) to Windows 7, and they're not in a hurry to do another migration.

10: Windows 7

Microsoft is its own biggest competitor with Windows 8 on the desktop and laptop. Windows 7 has been a big success, and for good reason: It delivers on the promises Microsoft has been making now for so long regarding security and reliability. Windows 7 finally "just works." All the consumers and IT departments that have been clinging to XP far past its prime will be doing the same with Windows 7, and Microsoft is not likely to get them to jump onto the Windows 8 train easily.

Additional resources

Your take

Do agree that these issues represent major hurdles for Windows 8? Do you think Microsoft will be able to overcome them?

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

257 comments
rkegel
rkegel

I agree with some of your points and I see what you're saying but I think you're missing on some. First of all I don't think Microsoft cares right now if businesses switch to Windows 8. They see they're switching to 7 and thats fine for them. Windows 7 will be around for a while and maybe they'll switch to Windows 9 or 10. Businesses are always behind on migration. Windows 8 is mainly for consumers and for really adventurous businesses who see that having a laptop that is also a tablet when undocked as being useful. Maybe hospitals won't use Windows 8, but doctors may for instance. Companies don't have to use Windows 8 right away, some specific people within companies may find a use for it and its not like Windows 8 won't work with Windows 7 and older versions of server, its still NT at the core. #5 you mention that companies won't use it because RT doesn't have active directory. Well yes they won't use RT tablets but if they want they can use Windows 8 tablets. Sure RT tablets will be thinner but Windows 8 tablets will do more, they'll run Windows desktop programs which RT won't either. I think RT will be the harder sale across the board because it won't run Windows desktop programs, not that it won't do active directory. If Microsoft brings out some compelling Metro apps then consumers will buy Windows RT tablets. If a business or a gamer wants a tablet they will buy a Windows 8 tablet with a core i7 processor and a high end Nvidia or ATI graphics chip. The Metro UI will be a big sale. The thing is new PC's will be sold with Windows 8 and consumers will buy new PC's. Even if Windows 8 becomes the next Vista it will still sell well. Sure the economy is tough now, but people will buy inexpensive PC's and laptops...especially laptops that turn into tablets like the Windows 8 Trasnformer version that Asus is showing off. I agree with #7 and also the fact that they're going to put their SmartGlass technology on other platforms as well. I wrote about this in an article I wrote http://goo.gl/dvgYS. The more Microsoft develops for other ecosystems the harder the sell it is for Microsoft. I get that, you get that, and others seem to get it, but I don't know why Microsoft doesn't. If anything Windows 8 should be a test to see if SmartGlass and other pure Microsoft products can help the sale of Windows 8. Instead its almost like Microsoft is figuring Windows 8 will sell because its Windows and it doesn't need a carrot to entice people to buy it. They may be wrong. So unless Microsoft has something up its sleeve like omitting some options in the iOS and Android versions of SmartGlass or charging a huge amount for the app to get them to think twice about buying an iPad and the app instead of a Windows 8 tablet where the app will (hopefully) be free. We'll have to see.

DT2
DT2

First - I love Windows 7. Have it running on six PCs at home and one running Windows Home Server. Been playing with Win8 since the initial Developer Preview. There a couple of big "gotchas", well actually, more than a couple. Strike one: There seems to be no consistency across applications. Some only open in Metro. Some, mostly admin functions, only open in the desktop. Many have a completely different look and feel than the others. Some file types default to Metro but the application that opens isn't compatible with the file type. Ex., I was able to connect to my DLNA server from the desktop but when I selected a video file there it opened in the Metro Video app. The video app only displayed video files stored in the Microsoft cloud and didn't even attempt to play the file I selected. There was a way to open local files in Metro but my DLNA server was missing from the list. Strike two: EVERYTHING in Metro relies on the cloud to function. I installed Win8 on my six year old convertible table/laptop PC. I was able to get most of the hardware functions to work but never could get the stylus to function. I realize the machine is rather old but one would think that there is some sort of generic touch/stylus driver built in. Brought the laptop into work to show some of the guys how bad Win8 is. Didn't take long. I am not allowed to connect to the corporate network with my personal equipment so, since Metro depends on a functioning network connection, my PC basically became an anchor. If you have no network access Win8 is useless. Strike three: Tried to access a web site with a lot of Flash content using Internet Explorer in Metro. Said I didn't have Flash installed. Tried to install it and it said I already had Flash and that I would have to open the site using the desktop version of IE. Two versions of IE, each incompatible with the other??? You're out! Bring back Windows ME, BOB and Clippy... Even they were better! ;-)

ssummit
ssummit

Windows 8 Prerelease version does add some nice touches. I, like the rest of the known universe, hate the Metro interface, which, amoungst other things, doesn't seem to allow drag & drop so you can't create folders of applications on the desktop. But add Classic Shell 3.5 and virtually everything's back to normal, i.e. Windows 95ish.

ahusmc
ahusmc

If Windows 8 sticks with Metro UI, I'm switching to Linux Mint KDE!

birdmanicx
birdmanicx

How easy is it/how difficult will it become to buy a Windows 7 PC or laptop as time goes along?

SpiritualMadMan
SpiritualMadMan

I am just sick and tired of having to part with favorite and very functional pieces of software every time M$ changes the OS! This will probably push me to Linux. I shouldn't have to upgrade at extreme cost to get XP Mode which still doesn't run a lot of stuff I could get to run under *real* XP. Even then You really do need a higher end computer to run XP Mode. The economy sucks... And, most of us can't afford to buy a new stable of software everytime M$ wants us to...

JJFitz
JJFitz

I have very few complaints about Windows 8 but will my users see it on their work desktops any time soon? No. When I used to manage an immunology lab, we had controls and experiments. Controls are things that don't change so that you can compare them to experiments (which do change). When I transitioned to IT management, I brought that concept with me. My users' desktops and applications are the controls and my IT staff's desktops are the experiments. The IT staff uses the new stuff to figure out how it works and weigh out the cost versus benefits. That's why my 200+ users are running XP on desktops that are a minimum of three years old. They work for now. This year, I will probably move the users to Windows 7. It will be an easy transition for the users. Many of them have been using it at home for some time and I know that there aren't any issues with any of our business applications or network. Windows 8 will go on the IT staff computers for at least a year before I release it on the rest of the staff. [i] If I release it on the rest of the staff at all. [/i] Afterall, I skipped Vista for my users. In the meantime, the users can try Windows 8 out on their home computers. There is nothing in our business that says we need Windows 8 at this time.

srgg01
srgg01

So far testing W8, the biggest issue that I've found is Metro interface. Everybody is used to a different UI and make it to complicated to adapt the home brewed apps. And honestly, is ugly. We are planning to stick on XP and W7 for PCs, and 2003 for servers.

jaski22
jaski22

It is so unfortunate that corporations feel the need to (dumb down) their products in order to please the masses. people use their phones for social message systems i.e. Texting rather than talking, tablets are right behind and now they are trying to make my beloved computer a social media device with pictograms and touch screens so all the lovely socialites can feel comfortable using the computer as if they where still on their phone. I am an I.T. professional, I want my computer to require some intelligence and effort to use. I want to think while using it, setting it up and tweaking it out is a pleasure and a joy I do not want to loose. Microsoft should create 2 separate OS's one for the idiot commercial public wanting to use a quad core, 8 gig ram, 4 video card pc as facebook communication center and picture poster and one for those of us wanting their pc to be an I.T. workhorse / gaming monster. I hear by reject the METRO UI and any future attempt to turn my beloved computer into a universal media idiot box. can we please turn the tables and expect the general public to rise up to the level of expectation and learn how to use modern technology. It's bad enough we allow our children to graduate with honors but cant read and spell at an eight grade level, please don't create a system that requires no thought or effort on the part of the user to interact with it. This wil only add to the collective ignorance and dumbing down of our society.

rduncan
rduncan

...so Apple sell 67 Million ipads - on completely crippled architecture with absolutely no open standards- and everyone is bitching because of Metro?- seems dumb to me! Windows 8 does everything Windows 7 does AND has a touch UI wtf ppl?? enjoy IOS and iTunes I know what I would rather

333239
333239

I've got Windows 8 Release Preview running on a cheap Acer tablet - it's great, much faster than Windows 7 and the Metro UI really works well and it's simple and straightforward to use. As a long time iOS user I would say it is a step or two forwards from the iPad as an OS. Being able to fall back to normal Windows apps is a huge plus too. It offers very little to the desktop user though, and I suspect that's what many people seem to be judging it on - don't - Windows 8 is for touch devices. Most, like me, will stick with Windows 7 for the desktop.

johnianwing
johnianwing

I am a one man show and I am on my computer 12 to 14 hour a day. Whether I am using my laptop or PC, I use a separate mouse and keyboard. My fonts are large and my screen is about 4 foot away. I touch type so I am pretty quick. I lean back in my armchair to relax my shoulders as I type and my mouse is just a few inches away. I can never work this fast with a touch screen. It is no use to a pro.

JJFitz
JJFitz

In my opinion, all of this gnashing of teeth due to a new Windows OS is ridiculous. It reminds me of the hype behind Y2K. Airplanes are going to fall from the sky! The robots are going to take over! I am hoping that those of you who post here have at leasst installed Windows 8 and used it for more than a week but I wonder how many of you have simply read articles, looked at screenshots, or watched it on YouTube. I have been using it on a three year old touchscreen laptop convertible and I am very impressed with it. Here are a few things you should know about W8. 1. [b] You do not have to see or use Metro for more that 10 seconds at start up if you don't want to.[/b] If you want to get out of the Metro screen because you see no value in looking at live tiles of your calendar, email, social networking, or the news, you can put the desktop tile in the upper left corner. As soon as Metro shows up on screen, hit the enter key and you are back in your comfort zone (aka the desktop). 2. You can pin your favorite applications and even executables such as shutdown.exe and windows lock on the Metro screen and the desktop taskbar so you can get to them very quickly. If you use Vista or Win 7, you may already pin your applications to the taskbar. It is not new or very different. 3. You can find any application or file quickly from the Metro screen by just typing part of the name. Example: Type "W" and Windows Explorer shows up at the top of the apps list. Type "Co" and Computer, Control Panel, Remote desktop Connection, and Command Prompt show up. This is not new either. You can do the same thing in Windows Vista and 7. Start > Search bar > "W". It's just faster in Metro. 4. You do not have to buy any apps for Metro unless you want to. 5. Get used to using the Windows button on your keyboard. It is very handy. It is also handy in Windows Vista and Windows 7. 6. You don't have to swipe up to get to the login screen. Just start typing in your password and the login screen will appear with your password in the appropriate login box. Here's hoping that you give Windows 8 a real test run.

bcscouse
bcscouse

I too have found Win8 to be a bit of a mess when it comes to trying to provide the one compatible OS for both mobile and desktop computers. The emphasis seems to be more towards the mobile with the awful Metro UI which is a real pain on a desktop. I have heard and read that the desktop is on its way out and this is the reason Microsoft have made thier new OS more for the pads and smartphones but speaking from the real world, the desktop computer is and I think always will be the major component of most industries. I may be OCD in my own dislike of a touch screen is having to clean it every 15 minutes from the finger marks that I get on my smartphone and pad even though I keep my hands as clean as possible and the thought of doing this on my 32 inch desktop screen is quite disturbing so there is no way I would use this. As Charlie pointed out the actual effort of reaching across the desk to touch the screen is not the most comfortable way to work either so the entire process is not the greatest selling point for Win8 anyway. My own prediction is that Win8 will be as popular as Vista and only because the few new purchases due to the current slow market will have it pre-loaded but I agree that Win7 is the replacement XP and will be the most popular OS for quite a few years to come. I commented to Microsoft about this soon after the first pre-release version but they didn't listen and are still sticking with Metro which will be the major factor of its unpopularity.

Babur
Babur

-iPad/Android: iOS without a doubt is the trend setter, the leader in mobile market, whereas, Android (UI feels like a copycat of iOS) which succeeded mainly because it has been distributed as 'freebie' to the likes of Samsung/LG/HTC to name few. Not to mention its stability and security troubles. I have owned six high end droids so far, and all of them suffered from one issue or another, so I don't see it is qualitatively better either. -Distrust of Cloud: Isn't this the same for Google? I think just as MS integrated IE in the core OS many many years ago (which everyone is now doing) MS is making a radical change, it make perfect sense to have the ability to develop for multiple platforms, how they execute it is still to be seen. MS however, can lower the risks considerably, by simply adding the 'Start' button, and letting people learn new UI and let them make choice about transition time.

bwallan
bwallan

We had been moving to 64 bit Win 7 over the past year. I say "had" because we've now had to reverse course a bit and redo those installations to 32 bit Win 7 simply because we could not afford to replace all the peripheral hardware that would not run on a 64 bit OS. We'll be on 32 bit Win 7 for an awful long time... just as we were (and still are) on Win XP w/ about half our PC's. Some of these Win XP platforms will be kept running indefinitely! In fact, we still have several Win 3.1 platforms operational for client support... and they are just fine for the applications being run under Win 3.1.

JJFitz
JJFitz

A few quotes from the article: "First, there???s the question of whether or not this figure is accurate." "And don???t forget that Windows RT includes more than just Windows 8 for an ARM device. It also includes Microsoft Office." "Is Microsoft really charging that much for Windows RT? We won???t ever know for sure, but it???s hard to imagine that they???d back OEMs into a corner with Windows 8 ARM hardware and make it difficult to compete with the iPad on price." It sounds to me as if the manufacturer reps at Computex who quoted the price are setting the groundwork to make themselves look like they are taking a bath on the "Microsoft mark up". I can picture the salesmen saying, "Eventhough Microsoft is charging us $85 for the OS we're still going to only charge the consumer $399 for this Win RT Tablet. We'll even throw in Microsoft Office to show we're good guys." They will intentionally leave out the part about the volume license discount they receive.

Justin James
Justin James

Windows 8 RT needs to be priced at $15/copy (which is basically the various patent royalty fees many OEMs are paying for Android right now... mostly to Microsoft, ironically...) or less to make it on phones. It is my understanding that Windows Phone 7 is already coming in at that price point. No OEM can survive in the tablet game if they raise the price $85 for nothing that benefits consumers directly. J.Ja

JJFitz
JJFitz

rolling my eyes.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Same approach. Like Vista, I'll inflict it on myself after the first service pack or if I replace my system. Like Vista, my users may never see it.

JJFitz
JJFitz

I use Win 8 RP on my convertible tablet and I find it very useful too. - leap ahead of Windows 7. I assume that most workers have a single desktop monitor and most of them spend the majority of their time in standard business applications such as MS Office, MSProject, ERP, EDMS, Web apps, databases and in house applications, most people will spend little time in Metro UI. However, If you have more than one monitor, you could keep one for Metro UI. Use it to monitor communications (email and IM) and your calendar. I really like the simplicity and live tile features of the Metro mail and calendar apps.

JJFitz
JJFitz

The world does not revolve around you. Your needs and wants are not the same as everybody else's. You say, "(A touch screen) is no use for a pro" What if you are a composer, video game designer, SCADA programmer, videographer or graphics designer? The ability to use your fingers on a screen would be very useful for zooming in and out, rotating and stretching images, editing timelines, editing sound files, testing SCADA screens, and testing a touch enabled video game. They would probably like to set up their screen on an angle like a drafting table. - Not four feet away. I am glad that your set up works for you but don't assume that it works for every kind of "pro".

Slayer_
Slayer_

Type into metro, "Windows explorer"? I don't think users are going to like that.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

and they're only doing that so because they recognise some people will need some Office functions and are setting the Win RT up to have Vendor Lock-in and not allow users to load up other Office Products. Kind of like when they put MSIE into Win 95 to discourage people downloading Netscape because they already have IE. I'll be interested to see how certain government watch bodies accept that one.

Slayer_
Slayer_

But I wouldn't mind another nail in the Windows 8 coffin.

JJFitz
JJFitz

and then give it to my users.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

for a touch screen and touch screen based GUI. Then clear point is that NOT everyone wants or can use a touch screen GUI for their computer usage, and the data to date is that Metro is NOT friendly to mouse usage. Yet Microsoft is saying "Stuff anyone who doesn't want to use a touch screen as that's all we're doing, or we'll put a kludgy mouse app in, and you can use some keyboard shortcuts you Luddites."

Slayer_
Slayer_

Have you actually tried graphics design with your fingers.? Most design programs just let you grab corners and edges with 4 x 4 pixel "handles" and they are usually clustered together. The more complicated the model, the more closely clustered they are. Making touch, worthless. Why bother when your mouse can do that touching for you. Editing time lines? So you press and hold the time line, then scroll the screen how? swiping with your other hand? Game designer? You mean placing models on screen, or just writing the simple questing scripts? Both use keyboard and mouse, more often the keyboard is used so you can place models exactly where you want, touch is useless. And I seriously doubt the programmers are going to bother making touch optimized tools for the designers. Most of the time the tools are very crude. SCADA programmer? I tried looking this up, no idea what this is.

JJFitz
JJFitz

You can continue to tell them to 1. Go to the desktop, open windows explorer and navigate or type the name of the file in the search bar or use the new manage feature built into explorer 2. Open the application that they created the file in and look for recent files. (ex. MS Word) Or do it a new way by 3. Pressing the windows key (to get to Metro) and type a part of the file name. 4. Pressing the windows key (to get to Metro) and type in "Ex", open explorer and follow option 1. You can decide what works best for you.

JJFitz
JJFitz

with a walled garden approach. That will keep me away from Win RT ARM based tablets.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

vendor lock-in due to the EUFI lock down means they can only buy what's sold for it via the Microsoft shop and Microsoft already say it can't run the full MSO, and I'm sure they won't have Libre Office or Open Office available through the Microsoft Shop. They claim the fact it comes with a cut down version of Office means you don't need to load anything like it, so that may be where they come afoul of the watchdogs; I don't know. But I'm fairly certain the inability to put another browser on it is going to get them into trouble with the EU for ARM devices offered for sale over there.

JJFitz
JJFitz

but the average consumer might be fooled by an unscrupulous salesman. I'm not sure how integrated MS Office will be on a Win 8 RT tablet but I suspect that it would be less than IE was. It may not be that big of an issue with the government.

Justin James
Justin James

You are right that it won't formally be Window 8 RT (but it really will be under the hood, with one or two flags set somewhere). It will still be mighty hard to justify explaining how a version of Windows 8 where the Start Screen scrolls vertically instead of horizontally will be priced much different... J.Ja

JJFitz
JJFitz

I have been using Win 8 for a few months now on my tablet. Since it is a convertible tablet, there are times when I use it as a plain old laptop. I go back and forth from touch screen to mouse and I have no difficulty using the tablet with a mouse or trackpad. At first, when I set it to dual screen, I found myself trying to get things to work by touching the non-touch monitor. That was a bit frustrating but that taught me how to use the mouse to get things done. I would really like to try it on dual screen with the external monitor being a touch monitor.

Slayer_
Slayer_

Doesn't Kinect take pictures of you secretly? Also, wouldn't you basically just be air humping?

JJFitz
JJFitz

hard core flesh... I mean flash games.

Slayer_
Slayer_

I thought you meant smartphones and the like cause currently those are the only platforms with touch games [generalization]. To design a touch enabled game on PC, yes, would help to have a touch enabled monitor. But that's a chicken and egg thing. Why would a company, such as square enix, bother making a touch dependent game? (because, as Metro proves, mouse interfaces and touch interfaces can't coexist very well, the same as a game console interface frequently doesn't work well on a PC, as Skyrim recently learned.) when there is so few with touch screens. And Don't forget, Windows 7 also natively supports touch screens, but we haven't seen any real hurry to get touch screens out into the consumer market. And a big issue, gamers just don't seem interested in those gimics. We already have Kinect and Wii, and yes, they sold well, but the hard core gamers that buy every new version of a game, are still sitting around on the couch with a game pad. Motion controls, touch controls, hard core gamers have rejected them. Game Developers know this, so they have no reason to go through the effort of designing a fully touch enabled game. (bigger buttons, slower menus, time delays, etc.) Where I see touch becoming useful? Porn flash games, use your finger to uh, finger her... Or use two fingers... Or Pinch to.... pinch :)

JJFitz
JJFitz

Designing touch games for Windows 8 would require access to a touch screen. Your original reply centered on designing smartphone games. I'm not sure where you got that impression from my post. In your subesequent post you made it sound as if all pc gaming will somehow be required to use touch. That is a bit absurd.

JJFitz
JJFitz

the fact that a touch screen is available does not mean that a mouse, keyboard, or game controller are not. You can use a touch screen for lightweight games such as angry birds and you can use the mouse, keyboard, and game controller for feature rich games like COD. Wait a tick... It's just like Metro UI and the Windows 8 desktop. You can use Metro UI for lightweight apps such as mail and calendar and you can use the Win 8 desktop for more feature rich applications like Outlook. Did you see what I did there? ;)

Slayer_
Slayer_

I find it hard to believe, that the people that pay 60 bucks a game, are going to want to use touch screens. The top game genres are things like first person shooters (and third person shooters) and MMORPG's. Neither really benefits from touch screen. While you are reaching for your monitor, your going to get shot. So Angry birds is your only option? Maybe some of those face book games would be of interest to someone that uses a touch screen, but then again, they are going to be using a tablet, not their monitor. I don't know anyone that would WANT to touch their monitor. ...Oh no, hes right behind me, must turn around and shoot. Swipe~swipe~swipe BANG damn I'm dead, stupid mouse being able to turn a character a full 360 with one motion and stop precisely on target... those mouse users are hackers... I suspect that is how those rich 14 year old kids are going to sound in a few years.

JJFitz
JJFitz

but I am talking about the future. The buggy whip is not very useful in a car. My point is adapt or get out of the way. You sound like the guy who said, "If man were meant to fly, he'd have wings." Graphics Design - I use touch now in Photoshop. A stylus directly on a screen is very useful. - much better than a mouse pointer on screen -But how is a stylus different than a mouse? And we have had stylus input for ages, but you don't have to do it on your screen, they have those sketch pad things.I have used a mouse to draw and I have used the WACOM pads with a stylus and it is in no way as accurate as a stylus on the screen input. If you have never tried it, I guess you'll have to trust me. Game design - as in designing games for touch. It would be nice to have a touch screen if you are designing touch enabled games. So you say it would be nice to have touch screens cause some cell phone games use touch screen? Who said anything about cell phones? I was talking about games on a touch screen monitor. Someone who designs such games must need a touch screen to do it. (Same as SCADA) I suggest you take a look at the games and piano application on the Lenovo A720 all in one for an idea of what can be played on an adjustable touch screen monitor. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GU1JWZp547A Timelines - I use it now in Camtasia and Movavi when I create tutorials. Use your fingers to stretch a time line, insert objects, etc. -And you can use your mouse and scroll wheel even easier, (in your opinion but I disagree)

Slayer_
Slayer_

[i]but I am talking about the future. The buggy whip is not very useful in a car.[/i] -And pouring gas on a horse doesn't help either, so whats your point? [i]Graphics Design - I use touch now in Photoshop. A stylus directly on a screen is very useful. - much better than a mouse pointer on screen[/i] -But how is a stylus different than a mouse? And we have had stylus input for ages, but you don't have to do it on your screen, they have those sketch pad things. [i]Game design - as in designing games for touch. It would be nice to have a touch screen if you are designing touch enabled games.[/i] -Yeah, and Giant mecha robots would only be needed if you already had giant mecha robots, otherwise, they are useless. http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/geekend/sci-fi-rant-why-giant-mecha-robots-are-stupid/1148 So you say it would be nice to have touch screens cause some cell phone games use touch screen? I think if I was developing them, I'd just use my mouse, otherwise, to REALLY test it, I'd have to use a 2x3 inch monitor. Pointless, might as well just test it on the phone. [i]Timelines - I use it now in Camtasia and Movavi when I create tutorials. Use your fingers to stretch a time line, insert objects, etc.[/i] -And you can use your mouse and scroll wheel even easier, so whats the big advantage, just because I can push my car to work every day, doesn't mean its a good idea. [i]SCADA - supervisory control and data acquisition systems - systems that run industrial equipment / process control. They have been using touch screens for more more than a decade. It would be helpful to have a touch screen to test your program.[/i] -This is at least reasonable. [i]I am not saying that a mouse does not have its place but sometimes direct touch is better [/i] -I'll agree, but so far the times when touch is better than mouse is pretty slim, so far, touch is a compromise.

JJFitz
JJFitz

but I am talking about the future. The buggy whip is not very useful in a car. Graphics Design - I use touch now in Photoshop. A stylus directly on a screen is very useful. - much better than a mouse pointer on screen Game design - as in designing games for touch. It would be nice to have a touch screen if you are designing touch enabled games. Timelines - I use it now in Camtasia and Movavi when I create tutorials. Use your fingers to stretch a time line, insert objects, etc. SCADA - supervisory control and data acquisition systems - systems that run industrial equipment / process control. They have been using touch screens for more more than a decade. It would be helpful to have a touch screen to test your program. I am not saying that a mouse does not have its place but sometimes direct touch is better

JJFitz
JJFitz

It sounds like you may be confusing Metro and the Windows 8 desktop. Metro is lightweight but the desktop still lives. You can still find your files using Windows Explorer [i] on the desktop [/i] To do this, either go to the desktop and open Explorer or type "ex" when on the Metro Screen. Now run search that is built into explorer. so to answer your questions... [b]Type mscomct2. Does it find it? [/b] Yes (I upgraded from Win 7 so it is there. It does not exist in Win 8. But ya know what? This is the first time I ever heard of the file. Will a typical user really be looking for it? [b]How about regsvr32. Is that found? [/b] Yes Explorer found both mscomct2 and regsvr32 in seconds. I have no idea what a "TFS repository off my C drive" is so I can't help you there. [b]Does word or winword work?[/b] Yes, either will work. [b] multiple monitor support[/b] Win8 supports multiple monitors. You can tile your applications across several screens. Again, I think you are confusing Metro Apps with the Windows 8 Desktop. You can tile two Metro Apps on one screen provided the Metro screen is 1366px wide. You can do any sort of tiling of desktop applications from the Windows 8 desktop. (Span across screens, use multiple independent screens, duplicate screens, etc.) [b]old games?[/b] I can't answer for every old game out there but, you might be able to run them in a virtual environment. You should try out Windows 8 a little more. ;)

Slayer_
Slayer_

Type mscomct2 Does it find it? How about regsvr32 Is that found. The first is a file in the system folder, the second is a common application. I have my TFS repository off my C drive. If I type in the name of my sln, will it know it, or even just the folder name, will it know what I am talking about? Does "word" or "winword" work, or do I have to type Microsoft Word? If the latter, do I have to type Microsoft for every Microsoft product. (MS source safe, MS visual studio, MS word, MS excel, MS outlook, etc) I presently have open, Visual Source Safe, Outlook, ontime, 3 folders, Pidgen (and 2 chat windows seperated), a PDF, Chainsaw, Custom deployment software, And the 2 programs I am currently developing, and of course, Visual Studio. I have these programs spread across 3 monitors in a tile fashion. Can Windows 8 do this, or is every one of them stuck to full screen and to the whims of the OS whether they stay open or close? Please, let me know your results. I wonder if the old games that used to hide your mouse by moving it to the bottom right corner will now cause the charms bar to appear overtop of your game. That would suck.