Linux

10 IT flame wars that will never go away

Anyone who has spent time in the TechRepublic forums is well acquainted with the ongoing skirmishes and philosophical conflagrations that IT pros often engage in. Jack Wallen looks at 10 of the most enduring battles being waged in the IT world.

Anyone who has spent time in the TechRepublic forums is well acquainted with the ongoing skirmishes and philosophical conflagrations that IT pros often engage in. Jack Wallen looks at 10 of the most enduring battles being waged in the IT world.


If you've been involved in IT over the past few decades, you know that the flame of war has always burned strong. It's like the best rivalries in sports, with camps residing on opposite sides of the field. Chances are, you've been in at least one of these flame wars over the years. You might still be deeply entrenched in your camp's battle for ultimate supremacy.

In this article, you may very well find the flame war that has been a part of your IT world. If not, let us know what your favorite troll bait is.

Note: This article is also available as a PDF download.

1: Linux vs. Windows

In my personal world, there has never been a bigger "cause" to send me scrambling to my soapbox. In the mid to late '90s, Linux was all about "World Domination," and it wasn't afraid to say so. It needed that credo because it had what seemed like an un-winnable fight on its hands. And although many still see that fight as un-winnable, Linux has done the unthinkable by taking Windows down a peg or two -- and not only because of the Apache Web server. The Linux desktop has proven to the world that it knows how to create interfaces and desktops to one-up nearly all of the competition. But Windows keeps the world in its stranglehold. The hardest (and most influential) market to crack - the enterprise.

The battle cry for these camps? Linux: "Freedom!" and Windows: "Market share!"

2: Mac vs. PC

If I asked why there are so many battles involving Windows, I believe the answer would be a resounding "Market share!" (see above). And yes, Mac is included in this. However, it goes beyond the operating system. This battle is as much about aesthetics as it is about a working piece of software. To Mac lovers, their machines are finely tuned, beautiful pieces of art that must not only be used but be displayed prominently at their desks or on the table at the coffee shop they frequent. To Mac haters, the Mac is nothing more than an overpriced, underpowered toy that can't do nearly what their machines can.

The battle cry for these camps? Mac: "iLove my Mac!" and PC: "Half the cost!"

3: Cloud vs. local

Anyone who reads IT-related news has run into cloud computing. To many, this is just another way to repackage thin clients. Those who worked in IT in the early '90s will remember thin clients well. And most of these memories are not good. So those who remember thin clients amid a cloud of horror will see cloud computing in the same insufferable way. But to those managers of larger enterprises looking to save money and manage machines with a finer lens, cloud computing can be a boon. Most likely, this battle will be fought between IT pros and either upper management (seeing the power that cloud computing could bring their company) or the sellers of the hardware. Cloud vs. local is a "those who do" vs. "those who talk about doing" conflict.

The battle cry for these camps? Believers: "Single point of administration!" and nonbelievers: "Single point of failure!"

4: GNOME vs. KDE

If you are involved with Linux, you know that the GNOME vs. KDE battle has been going on for a long time. Now in most flame wars, you might find a few in both camps who support both sides. Not in this battle. The GNOME vs. KDE clash is a vicious one that never has and never will see a pleasantry tossed across the DMZ. GNOME users hate KDE and KDE users hate GNOME. This battle goes beyond the interface and slithers its cold, hatred-filled finger of doom down into the very tool kits used to create the widgets.

GNOME users hold on to the fact that the KDE tool kit (Qt) was once proprietary. Qt is now released under the LGPL which makes that point no longer valid. Both camps also claim the language used to write the other side's desktop is inferior. GNOME uses a lot of C and KDE uses a lot of C++. Both languages have their pros and cons. Ultimately, it comes down to look and feel for the end user, and that's all personal opinion.

The battle cry for these camps? GNOME: "KDE 4 looks like Windows!" and KDE: "KDE 4 looks like Windows!" You do the math.

5: Social networking sites vs. managers/haters

There is no denying it: Social networking is HUGE now. Everyone you meet blogs, has a Facebook page, tweets on Twitter, and is LinkedIn. That is, of course, unless you are someone who shuns modern communication tools or you are a manager. Social networking sites are vast time-suckers. On the other hand, they're also one of the best forms of networking and/or advertising. Those who hate social networking sites see little to no value in them. Those who have friends do. Facebook has a certain value, but does it have value in the workplace? That is one of the key issues in the battle. Can people be productive with a social networking site open in their browser?

The battle cry for these camps? Social networking fans: "i haz 500 friends! LOL" and managers/haters: "You're fired! LOL!"

6: Vi vs. emacs

Let's go old school for a moment. The flames of this war, for all but a few, have died away. But that is not to deny the power, hatred, and anger this battle pulled out of otherwise normal human beings. I remember attending a LUG (Linux User Group) meeting a long time ago and nearly getting kicked out because I wouldn't join one side of this battle or the other. I was a Pico user, and I was scorned by both sides.

What I've always found interesting about this battle is that both tools work very well -- once you know how to use them. And that is the key to this war. It always seemed to me that the vi vs. emacs battle was more about which tool was harder to use. After using Pico (and now Nano) for years, vi and emacs both seemed a bit much for an editor. Ah, I can feel the burning stare from the remaining members of both camps as they flare up to yell, "It's not JUST an editor!"

The battle cry for these camps? Both are done in overly complex regular expressions that can't be understood by mortal man.

7: Google vs. everyone else

The interesting thing about this battle is that those who oppose Google usually can't cite a justifiable reason for their hatred. Most spout hatred for SEO or the fact that "Google" is now a verb. But while these people espouse their hatred for the search giant, they desperately long to see their sites rise to the top of Google rankings. And with good reason! Google is the number one search engine on the planet, so they need high rankings.

But at the same time, there may be something to support so many folks tossing cries of "foul" and "evil" at the search giant. Take this anecdote, for example: As I write this paragraph, I am using Google Chrome on Fedora 10. Every time I use Chrome with the search string "why hate google," the page I click on winds up crashing the tab I am using. So Chrome doesn't want me searching for reasons to hate Google. Interesting. Very interesting.

The battle cry for these camps? Google: "We will own the world!" and everyone else: "Let me Google that. Oh wait, you didn't hear me say that!"

8: Firefox vs. IE vs. Chrome

Ah, the browser war. During the '90s, this was certainly a fun battle from any side. It didn't matter which camp you were in. Even if you weren't on a side, this battle was fun. The best part was listening to those who spouted off a litany of what they thought was "fact" when in reality, few people back then knew where Mozilla came from or why one browser was better than the other. Most people were just amazed they could type something in a text field and a Web page would appear as if drawn from Merlin's wand itself. That battle had all but died away when Google Chrome came about. Now the flames have been reignited with a vengeance by a browser that blows the others out of the water (with respect to speed). Will we get to see a resurgence of the mid-90s browsers wars? I hope so.

The battle cry for these camps? Firefox: "We are the true innovators!" and IE: "Resistance is futile!" and Chrome: "We are the future of browsing!"

9: P2P file sharing vs. tried-and-true consumerism

This is one of those battles waged mostly between end users and ISPs, businesses, and the recording industry. The problem is that it gives P2P a bad name. Oh sure, the majority of P2P file sharing involves DRM'd content that should, in all honesty, be purchased. But there are plenty of users out there who employ P2P clients to download legal files. Take Linux distribution ISOs, for example. These files can be anywhere from 600+ MB all the way to 4 Gig files. Downloading them with a torrent client is much easier than from within a browser or wget. But that doesn't do anything to lessen the flames of war brought about by file sharing.

It mostly boils down to artists getting paid for their product. And they should. But as has been proven over and over, where there's a will there's a way. This battle will be won only if a compromise can be drawn. Those downloading DRM'd files should pay some sort of fee so artists are getting their fair share. Who knows what that fee is and how it will be enabled? Not I.

The battle cry for these camps? Fans of P2P file sharing: "Avast matey!" and everyone else: "The RIAA will sue you for trillions of dollars for downloading that copy of Journey's 'Don't Stop Believin'."

10: Administrators vs. end users

How could I not end this list with one of the most beloved battles of all -- us vs. them? It's all about end users stretching the already-thin strings of patience of the administrators. It's teacher vs. student. But in the end, it comes down to the job description -- which most often includes supporting end users. Does "supporting" translate to "babysitting"? I guess that would depend upon who is doing the translating. But someone with multiple degrees in computer science having to show end users how to click a mouse vs. end users not being able to get their job done because their computer has been infected with a virus can make for a heated battle.

The battle cry for these camps? End users: "My computer won't work!" Administrators: "I have real work to do!"

Pick your battles

These 10 flame wars have been raging for decades (at least in some instances). Which ones have you been a part of? Did we miss a battle or two? Tell us your side of these (or other) battles that have touched your IT life in various ways.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

140 comments
ktaborek
ktaborek

Pico truncates files. Things may have changed for Pico, but after a sysadmin opened our master password file (regional ISP) TWICE with Pico, truncating it at about 'n', it was removed from every single server and workstation in the entire organization. Yes, we had it backed up. So while I prefer Vi (learned it first and after gaining a passing familiarity with EMACS decided to stick with what I knew best) and have no angst against EMACS, I'll never use Pico.

lmassey
lmassey

Jack, I actually barked/laughed very loudly when I read this: Social networking fans: ?i haz 500 friends! LOL? and managers/haters: ?You?re fired! LOL!? HILARIOUS!!! And I very much enjoyed the rest of the article, too. Great stuff - thank you.

alexfiles
alexfiles

...as I read, I discovered I had a firm opinion in each instance ;–) Occasionally it encompassed both sides of the argument, but nonetheless I had occasion to think about each subject deeply enough to form a detailed opinion. I don't think that's me being particularly aware, I think that's the zeitgeist. Fun read, thanks!

ScarF
ScarF

Another example of the "brilliant" analysis produced by Jack Wallen with problems at the essence. One example: Mac vs. PC. Since Apple adopted Intel processors for its desktops and laptops, they became plain PCs with just another OS. The competition isn't anymore between Mac and PC but between Mac OS and MS Windows. As stupid as the "I'm a Mac, I'm a PC" ads.

oneal.j
oneal.j

You've generalized and you've chosen the most current and popular points of contention to present. There's a better list and a better person to write it. I'm frustrated that http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com asked you to share with me this notion. 2 marks down for you both.

Ken Cameron
Ken Cameron

I cannot believe that THE NUMBER ONE IT Flame War of all time is not even mentioned. If it weren't for this war, none of the ones mentioned here would have seen the light of day. I am referring to Mainframe versus Client Server! And now, the mainframe is back.....and it is pissed. I can virtualize 5,000+ Linux, Windows, an/or OpenSolaris servers onto a single mainframe server. Talk about GREEN!

GreyFoxTech
GreyFoxTech

Fun line there. "Those who hate social networking sites see little to no value in them. Those who have friends do." I don't hate them, but I see little to no value in them. I have friends. Friends are real people that you meet for conversations and to go hang out with. Friends are people that you can call to help you do things, that you can rely on and who can rely on you. Friends are not people who comment on your Livejournal and chat with you over the web. You do not know these people. As I like having friends, and not faceless representations people make of themselves that have little if any relation to their actual personalities, I simply see no use for Facebook et-al.

PaladinS
PaladinS

End users? Do they really exist? I always thought they were a myth.

shardeth-15902278
shardeth-15902278

1. Don't care Like 'em both. Probably lean toward Win 7 if it weren't for the whole product activation thingy, which I tend to find a trifle annoying. 2. PC I guess. Just don't see what the Mac Hardware + OS combo gives me that justifies the price+vendor lock. But no ill feelings toward them. 3. Some of both. Some things are great in the cloud. Some are better local My personal private data, I prefer to keep within my complete, local control. Paranoia?... 4. Happy with Both. Tend to use Gnome because it seems more stable to me generally, and more of the apps I use are Gnome native. 5. I'm neutral. Not a heavy user, but not opposed to them. They are a tool like any other - usable or abusable. 6. VI. But only because I know it, and don't know emacs. 7. umm... 8. Definitely Firefox... or IE... or Chrome... (okay, I don't use Chrome. It doesn't really suit me, and I generally prefer Firefox+addons from a security standpoint... But I'm not really picky. So long is it displays pages, and has tabs. 9. P2P, mostly - I think the app builders should be a little more sensitive to Bandwidth and Security, but I think it is a great distribution mechanism. Piracy happens with or without it. Education and Compromise is the way to fix that, not Luddism. 10. Both. Admins should serve the users. Users should seek to understand the admins directives. It appears I am a fence sitter...

Thump21
Thump21

Why does it make sense to use something that has *two* separate keys labeled "delete" (older keyboards have both a "delete" and a "del") that do two *different* things?! For some reason, Apple has not caught on to the "backspace" concept (arrow, arrow, arrow, ...) or jumping words or lines at a time to easily edit more quickly. Why is this too sophisticated a concept for such a shiny, powerful, overpriced, supposedly elite, compu-d'art "thingy"?! --to be fair, you can't call it a box. Oh, and should any computer *ever* display absolutely *nothing* in a window where your most critical data file icons are expected to reside? Of course, they somehow (not by the user) became mashed into some unnecessarily far off corner you can scroll to, but should this happen on something called a "computer"? One with a "superior" OS? [signed] --not a PC/Windows lover!

tomofumi
tomofumi

Intel vs AMD, nVidia vs ATI, RISC vs CISC, PlayStation vs Sega Saturn, XBOX360 vs PS3 vs Wii, PSP vs NDS, and format wars like: DVD+R vs DVD-R, HD-DVD vs Bluray, MP3 vs OGG, VHS vs Beta...

jkiernan
jkiernan

Debating these issues is like being in a closed room full of retards that are running around with scissors. You can enter the room, but you'll be rightly labeled.

timblackhall
timblackhall

I think Jack missed the mark just slightly on item number 9. The P2P Wars have nothing to do with the artists at all. This war is ALL about the Record Companies getting paid for the artists work and don't think it isn't. The record companies are greedy and have little interest in the art beyond making money. Otherwise great article. as a long time IT Pro I have seen all these and more including the old Token Ring vs Ethernet battles, and OS2 vs Windows.

kjmartin
kjmartin

How about 'Those who see technology as a tool, we're just trying to make a living' -VS- 'those who have passionate, possibly sexual, feelings about hardware and software'. The GNOME/KDE and VI/EMAC flamers would all be in the second.

steven.taylor
steven.taylor

This post makes me want to cancel my subscription to TechRepublic, which I've been thinking of doing for some time. Can you read the bias in this 10 things crap? Besides the javascript errors on this web site, and the fact that I've told them twice that the "save my login" doesn't work in IE. But I guess if you're not Linux/Firefox, you're not important.

alewisa
alewisa

1. "...mid to late ?90s, Linux was all about ?World Domination," Mid-90's, Linux was fledgling. By the last 90's, it was more widespread, "maturing", but was still better known for firewalling, beowulf clusters, and keeping old 486's going. Linux knows how to create a desktop? That's opinion, not fact. What holds Linux back is that it is still designed by techeads, and not interface experts. Its still too difficult to do common tasks such as changing elements. And seemingly with each release it changes... learn from Vista: changes to the interface are not appreciated... 2. Cloud vs local "Those who worked in IT in the early ?90s will remember thin clients well." And which thin clients were those, then? Serial line screen terminals? No. Networking Computing? Didnt arrive until 1997/8, hardly the early 90's. PC Anywhere type software? Not thin client. Single point of failure? No, try "multiple single points of failure", such as the FBI closing down the data centre hosting your company, because another server supports a botnet. Or the DC losing connectivity due to train crash taking out all incoming data lines which happen to pass over a bridge. Hosting company goes bankrupt. etc. etc. 3. The Browser wars. "Will we get to see a resurgence of the mid-90s browsers wars? I hope so." And which wars were those? be precise, provide software versions and dates. In the meantime, keep hoping, as there was no mid-90's browser wars. Netscape was never in competition with Lynx. or anything else, let alone IE. Why? MS considered the internet irrelevant, and didnt even think about the 'net until 1995. Lets agree on May. IE was never a contender until IE3, and took an arguable step back with IE4. If you had said the turn of the decade/century/millenium, I think you'd be more accurate. 4. P2P. You mean "copyright theft vs purchasing". Hmm, this existed long before, before the web even. Remember cassette tape? Most countries levy a tax on blank tapes, at the behest of the music industry, because their "customers" copy music tapes and albums. That was 30+ years ago. The C64, Amiga, ST, etc all suffered from piracy, (games downloaded and/or spread via dial-up bbs and mail-trading). The CD-R was seen as the greatest threat to the music industry in the late 90's... I know, I wrote the report on it and the industry's mitigation and how they could drive revenue from a convergence between CD-R and the fledging web, in 1998. All of which ignores usenet, of course :-) Or was the purpose of the article to prompt discusion, and not a lot more. Shame, as one can do that and still be acccurate.

Turin73
Turin73

In house or out sourced. Centralised vs decentralised. While these don't create the heat of Windows vs Linus, etc they are usually debated.

ToR24
ToR24

It seems that flames always consume all available chatter bandwidth. That's easy pickings to press people's buttons. But I have often pondered whether there exists any topics that require a selection among technical options, but garner no dissention, only universal consensus.

wanderson
wanderson

If the question is "Which operating system is PROVEN the most reliable, secure, flexible, powerful and cost effective/best ROI", then unquestionably the answer is Linux. Ease of use and attractiveness, while subjective has shown in Market Research and Merrill Lynch careful studies to give advantage to neither, so the above answer is strengthened. Please note, that when I use the word "proven", I am referring to the "non-paid for" and general industry acceptance of major analysis and studies performed by Major (Technology) Universities, NASA, The IEEE, The European Union, NSA, governments of Korea, Japan, South Africa, Taiwan, Brazil and the following industry titans - IBM, Oracle, Cisco, Intel, Salesforce, Boeing, NTT, Hughes Aerospace.... and "hundreds" more. Market share has never been a viable factor in technology quality or value - just look at larger market share of Chevy vs Honda. No contest in a sensible discussion on the topic of quality/value. W. Anderson wanderson@kimalcorp.org

itsgregman
itsgregman

In the Kde vs Gnome the battle cry should have been Gnome " you should just accept the default configuration because our devs know best and our users are easily confused" and Kde " infinite configurability". Also you mentioned the Gnome camps complaint about the origins of Qt but left out the Kde camp concerns about the proprietary nature of mono which is pushed by Gnome devs and used in almost every aspect of Gnome.

Marence
Marence

Do you keep all the PCs on all the time or have users shut down every night? This would occupy 3 or 4 hours once a week, as the "green" people said shut it down only to be answered that shutting down PCs every day limits their life span. There are real reasons to keep them on (auto updates, pushing out new apps, etc) but give me a break, using a power switch doesn't "significantly degrade the hardware." (yep, that's a real quote from a tech.)

Dyalect
Dyalect

The title speaks for itself. That Windows NT certification was gold back in the day, but its time to upgrade. Stay on top of technology. And running to every desktop is not the answer to everything. Use your tools/skills. (if you have them)

shryko
shryko

KDE 3.5: "It's solid, reliable, professional" KDE 4: "It's PRETTY and SHINY and NEW!!!" >.< this is my current flame war, really... 4.0 killed what I liked most about KDE, and really meant I was turned away from BOTH KDE and Gnome... and I know I'm not alone in the irritation at the flash-in-the-pan...

The 'G-Man.'
The 'G-Man.'

A complex mix of what to do, or not to do, if you have the facility.

henryawad
henryawad

A couple of other IT wars: Blackberry vs. iPhone (vs. Plam Pre) Xbox vs. Playstation vs Nintendo

DNSB
DNSB

PC? Last time I looked PC referred to "Personal Computer". Doesn't matter what the processor is -- 6800, 6809, 8080, Z80, F8, 8086, 8088, 68000, PowerPC, 80x86, homebrewed, etc. have all been used in PCs. The OS that runs on the PC is pretty much irrelevant to labeling a computer as a PC. You might even want to remember that Microsoft Windows ran and runs on multiple processor families though fewer these days. As I recall, MIPS, PowerPC, Alpha, Intel x86 and Intel ia64 are platforms that have been supported by Microsoft at one time or another.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Of course he chose current topics. Did you expect to see "Punched tape vs. punched cards?" "Calculator keypad vs. telephone keypad?" "8 inch floppies vs 5.25 vs. 3.5?" "DOS vs. CP/M?" As to there being a better list: if you've got one, share it. Criticism is easier than creation.

darpoke
darpoke

I'm just a baby dev, still writing my first XHTML/CSS projects and got a little commandline knowledge under my hat, but my favourite text editor atm has got to be TextWrangler, by BareBones. It's pretty customisable, really user-friendly and has never failed to make my life easier. It's even key-stroke friendly, since it displays shortcuts as you hold down modifier keys when menus are displayed. It's the free little brother of BBEdit if anybody out there was wondering. If you go to the site linked above, check out Yojimbo as well, I've yet to find an organiser for my crap that works quite as well. Great company. [Edit: thought I'd qualify the post by mentioning I tried Emacs, and didn't really see what all the fuss was about. Seemed to suffer from too much feature bloat for my liking, while being unnecessarily obscure.]

Slayer_
Slayer_

This MUST be what Microsoft thinks anyways.

darpoke
darpoke

I'm writing this reply on a Mac right now, and I've never had the problems you're talking about. Slimbody aluminium keyboard, backspace key above the main [enter] key. Delete button in the cluster above the arrow keys. The former deletes characters left of the cursor, the latter characters to the right. As it should be. If you want to jump words, hold [option] down while arrowkeying left or right. To skip to the end of a line, or the bottom or top of the document, hold [command] with the relevant arrow. Just as many text editors modfy commands with [CTRL] or [meta] keys. And as for the icon diatribe - what on earth are you talking about? Are you the last person using a Mac who still uses icon view? What the point of that? "I only want to see the files in the folder I'm in, with no context whatsoever". Please. Use List view or Column view like a normal person, you'll never see whitespace again. And as for Cover Flow...? Don't get me started. I barely use it on my iphone.

detours
detours

... I agree that it's stupid to enter an argument over things that ultimately don't matter. The right tool is the one that works for you. If you're building a house, don't argue over the hammer, just pound the nails. ______________ But regarding special needs and disabilities, comparisons like this do more harm than good. They show a level of disrespect that does the disabled a disservice and distracts from your point.

detours
detours

... I agree that it's stupid to enter an argument over things that ultimately don't matter. The right tool is the one that works for you. If you're building a house, don't argue over the hammer, just pound the damn nails. ______________ But regarding special needs and disabilities, comparisons like this do more harm than good. They show a level of disrespect that does the disabled a disservice and distracts from your point.

rasmusson.rasmusson52
rasmusson.rasmusson52

I have a mental illness. I have some friends that are mentally retarded. Can you understand time dialation? I can. Can you build your own IC spherically with basic tools? I can. Can you build your own renewable energy concepts with no funds yet just common garbage? I can. I find your use of the word retarded offensive to tell ya the truth. If that is how you are you really must think your better then every human on this planet. Is that so? I don't think so at all. Ther eis a scientific SOCIAL ORDER that had brought me into their circle. I have many problems due to mental illness yet had achieved more then a LINUX system in some regards, and always self reboot. Can I ask you a question? If you were dying, and you wanted to live longer what would you do? Clone your body and transfer your brian to another body to live longer? You would be astonsihed at the skills in thought of some persons that do have different capabilities. If you want to get along, I can too. I am adpatable to anything really, I bet your not. I can put all the money I have on that thaat your not adaptable to much comparred to myself. Too, I don't think your as artistic, inventive, or creative as myself, or can write as much as I, or can get away with the same things as I. I get away with things that are undamaging, becasue they make person think about who they are to lead onto a better path. Are you skilled in martial arts? I'm not, yet I am not afraid to make a stance. Can you solve the problem of mystic beliefs to offer change of path in the social structure? Here is some helpful advice, you can take it or leave it. All these retarded systems that were created in the past long ago, where by person that claim to be sane. Mentally ill persons don't bother anyone. There is a huge difference. So, if there is any finger pointing or blaming, please blame those that are not mentally ill. Sounds like you had issues with someone or some program that had nothing to do with retared human beings or mentally ill human beings, isn't that true? Then a question: why was your words forced onto the crowd of individuals not resonsible for someone elses dilemmas? I do not trust persons like you to tell you the truth. I have my own reasons why. Your mental apature is dibilatating to read. I wouldn't put any worth in a person that had words like yours, that is where all the trouble began with all those that claim they are sane, which your not.

ScarF
ScarF

I would emphasize a little: Pragmatism vs. Bohemianism IT Professionals vs. Jack Wallen

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

That one goes to the core of many of the original ones.

csmith.kaze
csmith.kaze

Pretty sure everybody agrees that the planet is, in fact, round. short of that, probably not. And the like 300 flat earth idiots: Really? Really?! What the hell guys? You either need to back off the drugs or start on them. I'm not sure which would be better.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Sure, it may cost more than the alternatives, but it's the new company in the old saying, "No one ever got fired for buying IBM."

LyleTaylor
LyleTaylor

Now, who's going to disagree with that? :-)

LyleTaylor
LyleTaylor

I thought that was freeBSD... ;-)

JamesRL
JamesRL

Seeveral of those organizations were previously big Mac users - NASA, Boeing, Hughes, and many Universities. So now I wonder if it isn't corporate culture that leads them away from the mainstream Windows platforms, and they just changed horses when Apple's steam started to run out. James

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

Posting your address on the Internet exposes you to spammers. If you wish to be able to receive e-mail from other TR members, consider enabling your account to receive peer mails. Click on 'My Workspace' in the upper right, then the Profile tab, then the 'Edit Profile' button. Go to the bottom and click the button beside "Allow other TechRepublic members to contact me." Second, it's easy to post the answers when you've framed your own question: 'If the question is "Which operating system is PROVEN the most reliable, secure, flexible, powerful and cost effective/best ROI" ' If we change the question to, "Which OS has the widest range of applications accepted in the business place, apps that more users are familiar with than any other OS's supported apps, and has more vendor-supplied drivers?", then the answer changes. The debate is framed by how you phrase the question. You're responses are right because you answered your own question.

ddomian
ddomian

Hey, wait a minute! You forgot Android! Yeah, I've got one; yes, I'm disappointed. All my mail has .pdf attachments, and even the paid apps will only read a tiny file. And NO flash! Makes me want my Motorola/Windows OS phone back. Oh well, just HAD to have the new gadget. Deb

jkiernan
jkiernan

I hope you don't have scissors.

alewisa
alewisa

Cisco isnt the vendor of choice for ISP core infrastructure/backbone, nor many telecos. Foundry and Juniper tend to rule the roost there. Cisco has the enterprise LAN/WAN market leadership, and a lot of "edge" presence in the backbone.

DNSB
DNSB

As you said, higher prices and. all too often, lower performance. I prefer to spend my money (or corporate budget) where I can get the most for the simoleon. Damn few people ever go into the server rooms or comm. closets then ask "Why didn't you buy Cisco?"

wanderson
wanderson

While my response to article was in reference to Linux vs Windows, I do indeed hold FreeBSD in high regard, and use same for one of my primary workstations as well as Web content server and collaboration server. W. Anderson wanderson@nac.net

Ed Woychowsky
Ed Woychowsky

If we're picking sides for a flame war, can I be on Tigger2's and Gadget Girl's side? TR hasn't had a good argument in about a week.

CharlieSpencer
CharlieSpencer

You can't be on T2 and G2's side; I'M on their side!

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