IT Policies

10 IT job roles that are hardest to fill

Some IT jobs seem to draw plenty of qualified candidates, but other jobs are nearly impossible to fill. Here are several positions that drive hiring managers crazy.

The IT job market is usually a seller's market, even in tough times like these. But some IT roles are especially difficult to fill. Here are 10 jobs that typically send companies into fits when they need to hire for them.

1: IT trainer

IT trainers play a unique role in the IT world, and they need a unique skill set. By itself, this position would be hard enough to fill. But add the fact that being a trainer differs in many ways from the typical IT job, along with the frequent need for travel, and you have a recipe for "tough hire."

2: Project manager

The biggest problem in hiring project managers is usually self-imposed: the "requirement" of a PMP certification. Why does that make it hard to hire? It isn't just that folks with PMP certification are expensive and tough to find. It's the difficulty of obtaining the certification in the first place. The certification has a "chicken and egg" logic to it: To earn it, you need to be managing projects... but it can be hard to get project management work without the cert. As a result, the talent pool is artificially small, and many otherwise well-qualified candidates get filtered out.

3: CIO/CTO/director of IT/etc.

IT leadership roles are extremely difficult to fill. Like IT trainers, leadership positions require the candidates to have skills that just are not learned in the typical IT job. Companies are forced to hire good leaders with weak (or nonexistent) technical knowledge or to hope that a technical person can learn the leadership and business skills required to be a success. It is difficult to find someone who has good "crossover" skills and whom you feel comfortable with, making leadership positions hard to fill.

4: Help desk staff

The basic problem with filling help desk jobs is that they usually pay far less than the person you really want to hire will accept. Plenty of people can do a perfectly fine job with the help desk position, despite the technical skills required and its challenges for workers (the stress of metrics they have little control over, like "average time to answer calls" and ticket closure rates, dealing with angry people over a phone, etc.). But how many of them are actually going to work for what the help desk job pays?

Most companies see the help desk as a necessary evil, a cost center to be contained. And in a way, they are right. With razor thin margins in many industries, the cost of support can make or break the profitability of a company. So it is natural for them to squeeze the salaries as hard as they can. But for managers looking for well-qualified workers, those tight budgets make it impossible to get the right help, unless they find a diamond in the rough or someone with a tough job situation.

5: Specialized programmer

Device drivers, operating systems, and mobile applications: Any idea what they have in common? The developers who know how to write those kinds of software and do a good job of it are exceedingly rare -- or there is a high demand for a relatively small number of developers. Some of these positions are just so specialized that only a handful of developers are doing it. Others (like mobile applications) have lots of developers out there, but the demand is just so high that the companies looking to make a hire have positions unfilled for months at a time.

6: Pre-sales engineer

Pre-sales engineer is another IT-related job that requires a diverse range of talents beyond the technical. To make it an even harder position to fill, it is a job that requires a lot of travel. Simply put, nothing can substitute for the hands-on demonstration when it comes to closing a deal. And on top of that, the job is almost pure customer service, often in person, which many IT people do not want to deal with, especially considering that they have other job options. A pre-sales engineer needs the heart of a salesperson wrapped in the mind of an IT pro, and that's a tricky mix to find.

7: Technical writer

Now, I'm not talking about bloggers and their ilk, but the folks who do things like write product manuals and help files. There is a reason why these tasks often fall on the shoulders of the developers, even when the company is willing to spend the money on hiring a technical writer: It is hard to find people who can write coherently, in a language that the end user can grasp, and who understand the technical side of things! This isn't a matter of hiring an English major who is "tech savvy" like people assume, either. Technical writers are hard to find, and good ones are even tougher.

8: Product evangelist

The product evangelists are the "face of the company" when it comes to the technical side of their business. They are the ones giving presentations at technical conferences around the world, hanging out in forums answering questions, constantly blogging, reaching out to folks on social media... and at the same time, they need to be on the cutting edge of their industry's technical knowledge. Few IT jobs involve as much travel as product evangelist. The right person needs to have an absolute passion for the work and for the company and its specific products, as well as the technical knowledge and soft skills to handle the job. This means that even if someone is a great evangelist at one company, he or she will probably be a poor hire for any other company doing the same job.

9: IT author

Writing technical blogs and articles is often seen as an easy job, and most of us are doing it as a secondary job. (Only a few folks can put a roof over their head with this work.) There are plenty of technical people out there who can use some extra money. All the same, it's a bear to find people who are not only willing to give it a shot, but who will stick with it long enough to really become "part of the team."

There is a lot of churn, as folks are bursting with great article ideas when they are hired, and a month later they have written everything they wanted to write and are stuck with a lack of article ideas. This is why you see certain names pop up in so many places. The number of IT authors who can consistently produce high quality content year in and year out is shockingly small. And that is just for the "magazine" style writers! Even big sites like TechRepublic are frequently searching for authors because it is so difficult to find the right people. Book authors are even more difficult to find, since the role combines the details needed for a technical writer with the ability to produce a multiple-hundred page tome, typically for just a few thousand dollars.

10: Maintenance/legacy programmer

Most programmers have seen these jobs before; they are typically disguised as something else, because so few developers want them. What are they? Jobs involving the maintenance of existing applications, often ones that have been around a long time and written in a legacy technology. Few programmers are willing to take these jobs because they are the kiss of death for a career. In an industry where "cutting edge" today is "obsolete" in a few years, working with technology already considered "legacy" means that you are likely to be stuck with the job for a long, long time unless you are willing and able to reinvent yourself outside the workforce.

On top of that, the work is miserable! You have to wade through endless amounts of poorly documented code that someone who is long gone wrote a decade ago. What usually happens is that companies hire junior and entry-level developers who are struggling to find work, luring them in with an ad that promises that it doesn't matter what they know (because of course, anything they know isn't old enough to be applicable anyway) and a "willing to train" clause. Experienced and intermediate programmers tend to stay far, far away from these jobs, unless they are also niche jobs. And the people who do get hired often they realize what a mess they've gotten into and see that the longer they stay, the harder it will be for them to get out -- so they quickly head for the exits.

Other hard-to-fill jobs?

Have you run into problems trying to hire qualified people for certain types of IT positions? Share your experiences with fellow TechRepublic members.

About

Justin James is the Lead Architect for Conigent.

217 comments
shaverd38
shaverd38

As for tech writing, I've noticed HR knows little about the actual daily responsibilities of the job and set absurd requirements. I can understand the need to be familiar with the technology, but what person who has experience with say configuration management or shell scripts is looking for a writing job? The most amusing tech writing posting I saw was from a Defense contractor looking to fill job that required a clearance. Along with the resume, the ad said that a tech writing sample would be required. Right, a job applicant is just going to blast off classified and/or proprietary material along with their resume and offer letter.

slwrigh
slwrigh

i agree offer more money. I applied for a help desk position that pays 12.00 to 15.00 hr. I would have taken it. had i been offered the position. personally, the recession is over and recovery is done. so, it's time to quit " " around get people back to positions that they are qualified for. just a thought

mdehrlich
mdehrlich

I am glad to see that one of the 10 best jobs is a helpdesk position. As a former mainframe operations person I am now trying to move my skills to the helpdesk and customer service areas. Any suggestions out there.

mlonghouse
mlonghouse

It's one thing to hire someone to replace/clone an existing position but it's a completely different challenge hiring for a brand new position. Not only are you trying to validate the candidate's ability to adapt to your corporate culture, but your corporate culture ability to adapt to the new position.

tyrannosaur
tyrannosaur

Here is a much more rare job but can be easily improperly filled: Facility(s) Engineer. What is needed is a person who has a complete understanding of all things in communications and computing along with how they all fit together. Now couple that with an apitude and understanding of HVAC, Electrical, Floors, Roofs, and much more. What you should have is a person who can, not immediately like a full time Cisco Engineer, step in do the work because they understand it, then 5 minutes later, deal with the fellow walking in the door who is there to fix the water fountain but discovers that the cut off valve is not working. 10 minutes later he is dealing with the generators or relating to the needs of cabinet placement or the MCSE or Linux Engineer talking about software. We are talking about an Omni-Tech here. Find one, they are rare.

kallingham
kallingham

Interesting thread- can't agree though. I know for a fact that there are a great many technical writers that cannot find work, and many more that gave up on the profession after the tech bubble burst over a decade ago. The truth is that tech organizations are often forced to downsize many times over, and face losing their most important assets- their engineering staffs. Downstream groups are decimated first- technical writing, QA, tech support, etc. These groups are downsized, and sometimes eliminated completely in an effort to maintain engineering staffs. Engineering personnel are then forced to take on these roles.

NoodlyAppendage
NoodlyAppendage

You know something? GETTING a job as a Tech Author is next to impossible, even when you are an excellent one. Why? Because the vast majority of employers demand a 2:1 Degree before they'll even sniff your CV, and if you have left university with an HND, started out in an entry-level IT job, worked in the industry for 11 years and made it to senior-level Management in that time, then progressed on to writing... Even if your ability to write about complex technical subjects is proven... Even if you have already made the career hop but are now unemployed due to the bankruptcy of your employer... Until employers stop being lazy and setting "requirements" which are solely devised to cut down the number of CVs they have to wade through in the current economic situation, we will remain downright impossible to hire. Because we're all here, waiting.

dbarry722
dbarry722

Technical support job are becoming increasingly harder to fill based on attitudes of Senior managers. Senior managers have this notion that tech support guys are 2 a penny and don't possess brains to have any managerial input. SM's don't seem to think long term and don't realise that tech support guys are quite proactive. Because our system is a managed service at work, I have informed them that 107 computers don't fit the criteria to work on the new cloud system that is due to be installed. SM's have just buried their heads and stated that it was the contractors problem. I've pointed out that the computers were bought by us and not their problem. Still no budging them.

TWBurger
TWBurger

Where are all these trainer/writer/specialized/legacy jobs? I can not find them. I am a: - Legacy COBOL/Fortran/PL/1 programmer with formal VAX 11/780 and IBM 370 training. - IT author of many technical articles for well known international firms - Technical IT writer for large companies and governments - Specialized programmer of AIX systems code and embedded devices - Specialized programmer of legacy medical information systems ETL - A college IT instructor and have years of experience in customer, internal, and designing online training There are no huge amounts of employment queries coming my way and my applications go mostly unnoticed. These may be hard jobs to fill, but they are even harder to find or attract. There seems to lie the problem.

gambacher
gambacher

I'm not seeing many jobs for technical writers. I've gone back to college to get a network security certification because I can't find work as a technical writer in Western Washington. I have over 20 years experience. I know how to use most technical writing software, including Adobe products like RoboHelp, FrameMaker, Photoshop, and Dreamweaver. I'm also a power user of MS Office through 2010, and Visio. Why can't I find a permanent position? If there is someone out there looking for a technical writer, feel free to contact me.

brooks@intellinet-comptng
brooks@intellinet-comptng

I have been an IT manager and IT director. I also (as a consultant) have helped companies find candidates in some of these positions. Especially for IT manager's/directors, but also true for some of the others, companies do not have a clue what they are looking for. I've had some embarrassing situations because a company laid out their "requirements", I identified and interviewed candidates based on those requirements. When the company management interviewed them - it was obvious they were looking for something else. They didn't understand their own requirements until they got some candidates in front of them. That is not an ideal situation. Sometimes "head hunters" are not very good at lining up requirements and candidates either. A big part of the problem is that management often do not have a good idea of what people in these positions do. They have a generic and stereotypical idea of what they do, but very little about what skills it takes for people in these roles to be successful .

roy.evison
roy.evison

They are expensive because it is a doubly skilled activity. You have to have sufficient knowledge of the subject you are giving enlightenment on and , importantly, how to pitch it. Developers will be 'bad' at technical writing because that is not their bent and are persuaded by an application of dollers or a big stick, or both. How does your company apportion technical writing? Roy.

drawman
drawman

Been doing it for years, and at present I seem to be stuck where I am writing Operation and Maintenance manuals for a water utility's site upgrades. So if anybody wants a Tech Writer with an extensive knowledge of mechanical and electronic hardware (everything from a vending machine to military aircraft radar) then what are you offering? Oh, and I live in the UK so unless it's near my sister (Washington State) then the USA is out.

AndrewRose01
AndrewRose01

In South Africa my experience (and opinion) is that technical documentation is left to developers and operational support people. It is only when the admin, legal expectations and reality of writing good documentation becomes too much of a burden that budget is considered for technical writers. Also, because writing is difficult to justify and measure when it comes to ROI, they are positions that are considered a "necessary evil". So I essentially don't look for this type of work because time can be spent on securing other types of writing contracts. A pity, but that's my reality of economic demand.

splatt316
splatt316

I have several years of IT management experience combined with hands-on technical experience and will soon have a MS in Management Information Systems (08/12). I have excellent interpersonal skills and I'm not asking for too much money, yet I remain unemployed in Houston, TX. I see and apply to hundreds and hundreds of posting that I'm fully qualified for but I've only had a few interviews. A few companies have expressed great interest but are only willing to pay a help desk rate. It seems like the hiring process is weeding out everyone that doesn't meet each and every one of the requirements of the job description. To an extent, this is understandable except when job descriptions are mixed with every IT job function and half of the existing IT certifications as a requirement. This is simply unrealistic and makes it extremely difficult to match good viable candidates to available IT positions.

jravitable
jravitable

I am an experienced IT manager that has been looking for work for several ,months but when I look at some of the ridiculous stuff required just to get them to consider you, it is crazy. Of course some of it is fine but it seems that some shops have no idea what they really need. As a IT Manager my fingers touched alot of stuff but I really wouldn't consider myself an expert in. Alot of what you must do is learn rapidly, adapt and have a firm foundation in IT to build on. The reference to the PMP is a great example. I wanted to get that cert but didnt have the requisite Project Manager (in title) experience.

aroc
aroc

That is how a number of us techies pronounced PMP at a certain large IT company considered blue. We learned not to expect much from most of them in how to manage a complex technology project since they knew far more about making pretty PERT and Gantt charts, and scheduling us "resources", than what those charts were actually dealing with. Every once in a while we would get someone who came from the tech ranks, and did understand what it was about, but they seemed to be the exceptions. The other problem was the managers who "got it" were driven by demands from above that made them set aside common (technical) sense, and their human decency, if they wanted to keep their jobs. I had several such managers that I respected and liked, but I came to realize that they were compelled to put obnoxious, short-sighted "business needs" above such decency to pay their bills. I was glad I got laid off after 6+ years since I was able find a job at a previous employer with skills learned, and thrown away by the "layer-offer" as part of those "business needs". It was quite gratifying a couple years later to learn that the support I provided was "recalled" from Brazil as the US-based customer became dissatisfied with the communications issues of dealing with developers in India and web admin support in Brazil - it seems 3-way international/cross-cultural coordination is a difficult trick to pull off, no matter how the beans are counted.

DRdrPhD
DRdrPhD

The more specialized, the harder it is in IT. My personal challenge has been A Healthcare IT Busincess Continuity / Disaster Recovery person with hospital emergency management training experience. It is a chimeric requirement with a vast practical and regulatory knowledge requirement. I've pretty much had to "role my own".

etreglia
etreglia

In my job as a tech support specialist, one of my primary tasks is to train users and provide documentation. As an English major, I guess that was a natural task to fall to me and I truly enjoy teaching people that technology is a tool not an albatross. However, that does not buy me any extra points and certainly does not score me any extra $. The people I work for seem to think the "technology fairy" comes down in the night and assume that because people were able to use computers to write term papers in college that they are "tech savvy." Ugh

heryzo
heryzo

Interesting to note that good writers on IT stuff are hard to find. I'm conviced I'm one of the rare ducks that can perform this (with trackable writing history on cloud computing and VPN/privacy as well as few years of system administration) ... How do we check if I can be a good fit for TechRepublic (I dn't seem to find some links for guest posting on Tech Republic)?

Yoric Watterott
Yoric Watterott

A network admin that's been with a company for years often has the most intimate knowledge of all the addresses, people's preferences, existing and eventual problems, procedures, and knows where discretion or discipline is required. That and the weight of trust that shared between user and admin which is often "loyalist reserved" makes it exceedingly difficult for anyone else to assist "their" end user. Lets not forget that the network admin is more like the GM of everything IT no matter how many app specific professionals or departments there are. you are the go-to-guy about everything! I wouldn't say it is hard to find the right network admin, but the time it would take to get the lay of the land and be expected to perform at the same level as the former counterpart definitely would make it a hard spot to fill. Any other network admins agree with me?

loki_the_fiddler
loki_the_fiddler

People with old skills often get paid more than those with new skills. Experience is often hard to find. Unix and perl still are current skills but at same time are legacy skills. Also alot of older CAD programs haven't changed much in 10-15 yrs. They all need updating etc.. so working on legacy programs often takes you into new skill sets and you get paid while doing it.

Cicuta2011
Cicuta2011

My apologies to all the people from other countries calling them ???ignorant???; in fact I should have kept myself to the technical aspect of support and how difficult ot is to understand the ???English??? from other countries and that makes things more difficult. I will research the job salaries in Australia also and see if they are compatible with those in the USA. I know for a fact that salaries in India and other parts of Asia and Latin America are very low reason why USA companies have taken a lot of jobs there. Any arguments on that?

RMSx32767
RMSx32767

Not too long ago I read an article/blog stating companies with so-called legacy systems are now actively recruiting at the college level because they are finding it challenging to fill their open slots with "we want to change the world" graduates. You know the kind; they are itching to be the next Jobs-erburg. If the code is so antiquated, why not simply re-write it in in cool-tech-du-jour? Because it works, that's why.

vaughndumas
vaughndumas

A knowledge of "vi" is often quite scarce and not always asked for. Many of us swear by it and ask "Is there any other editor?".

gevander
gevander

The jobs I have experience with all meet that description. 1: IT trainer 4: Help desk staff 7: Technical writer 9: IT author And the CIO job is unattractive to many DESPITE the huge paycheck for the elevated position because IT is the area where "the business" is most expecting high payout for small outlay - and expecting to pay LESS each year for MORE output. It's a "lose-lose more" proposition unless you are willing to talk through your ass to tell your IT staff how valuable they are while you demand higher output from those jobs you didn't already (and maybe can't) outsource.

diman75
diman75

The CEOs of today are not interested in grooming their internal employees much less considering it an investment. In the age of a global economy everybody is replaceable. These are the actual words of our CEO.

Kinetixx
Kinetixx

As one who has been working in computer technology since the time of punch cards, it has been my experience that while the specifics of a technology may expand (as the size may contract), the underlying logic of putting parts together and making it all work does not. We've gone from 56k modems to broadband, from mainframes to tablets, from writing letters to social media, which has meant changes in hardware, in programming and in user interfaces. Most of us, however, by the very nature of our interests in technology, look forward to the improvements and successfully navigate how to make it work in the newest/latest environments. Even if our jobs don't expose us to the newest tools, we often buy them for ourselves and test them out. What disappoints me is that too many companies view those of us who are "old dogs" as unable to learn the "new tricks". Perhaps that may be true for some, but for many of us with white hair, our brains are just as agile and quite capable of keeping up with trends. We are very attractive on paper, and can answer with ease the technical questions of interviews, even "perform" on the spot. We even have the advantage of experience, which always comes in handy. And yet we are finding we are up against what can only be called an age bias. In one interview I was told that because my last job had me programming with PHP 4, but the company was using version 5.3, I would not be a good fit! Well, that was what my old employer preferred. That's like asking me what version of microwave I use in the kitchen and assuming a model with an additional knob or button would be beyond my comprehension! (And the newest microwave I purchased had bells and whistles my last one lacked, yet I still managed to use the new one and its new features.) Another thought I'd be disappointed with the compensation, even though I clearly stated that I understood current salaries are lower these day and that was no problem for me. So when you write that positions are expected to remain unfilled because of a lack of available workers, perhaps the real question ought to be if companies are avoiding an excellent group of employees, for reasons that are, well, old-fashioned.

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

Professional Engineers. What you start to describe is what I know as a system integrator, then you morph to the facility or building manager. Building managers are almost always chosen from the skilled trades (plumbing, electrical, HVAC) and not from IT. The primary reason is that only the fixed IT infrastructure (power, racks, cabling, etc.) falls under the purview of the building manager. The actual equipment is installed and maintained by IT.

TWBurger
TWBurger

Unless it is your specific role to point out such technical problems don't make any noise. If SM is so obtuse as to ignore you they will also have no problem somehow blaming you for it or at least resenting it to the point of making sure you aren't working there for long. Being the smartest and best informed and wanting what's best for the company got me nowhere while I saw many get ahead by blaming others and taking unfair advantage. If you feel it is your duty: Inform the contractor in writing of the problem and CC the SM in charge and document and backup (offsite) everything. That way you can cover yourself if the contractor or the SM blames you.

TWBurger
TWBurger

Are you referring to the article?

aroc
aroc

Your experiences seem to indicate a big part of the fiasco of IT recruitment. There is too much point-in-time/technology specificity - i.e. a checkbox approach. People outside (and some inside) IT need to realize the nature of the discipline requires flexibility and adaptability in learning and applying technology as it changes, and not try to pigeonhole a candidate based on their past skills. Instead the focus needs to be on how quickly they acquired those skills, and how effectively they applied them - that is the best indicator of their likelihood to perform in the same manner in the future.

Tony Hopkinson
Tony Hopkinson

Who get paid a fair bit as well... Why did you put in doubly skilled? You think we develop, without knowing anything about what we are developing? It's not a better skill, it's not a harder skill, it's just a different one. If anyone wants to know why you don't use a devloper as Technical author, run up linux and look at a man page. or have a shufty on MSN for .net documentation. And those are our better efforts! :(

jsargent
jsargent

A developer is bad because they never have the time and patience to carry out that kind of work. If a developer gets a technical writing task he will almost always think that someone gave him/her the dirty end of the stick. It will always take twice as long because such work like many other jobs needs a work pattern and unless its your job then you don't know that work pattern.

splatt316
splatt316

I wouldn't have jumped on my soapbox had I ready your post first. On second thought, I needed to get that off my chest. As for the PMP cert, I too would have attained it but the time needed to finish my Masters and the time it is taking to search for jobs and the time it takes to complete each application leaves no time for me to work on the PMP cert or the ITIL. I refused to shift focus to the PMP cert because a friend of mine has a double Masters and the PMP cert and it took him over a year to find employment two years ago.

toni.bowers
toni.bowers

Start by emailing me at toni.bowers@cbs.com. (I'm the Head Blogs Editor)

NickNielsen
NickNielsen

I've sent a note to the editorial staff. One of them should be in touch to request samples of your writing or links thereto. Good luck!

Dknopp
Dknopp

With all of the outsourcing that is going on - whether it is overseas or just to a local contract company. DB people who have written the sql, and now are gone, and the code now has a problem and all you get from the outsourcing company is that they do not know anything about the code. Sys admins who are overworked and know nothing about the app on a system, so if there is not an immediate problem in front of them, they say no trouble found, and on and on.

jsargent
jsargent

Don't confuse "help-desk" spoken English with written English. While some people find it hard to understand the accent of a foreign person, very often a foreigner will put more effort into writing correct English than your friendly English "mother tongue" local. You only have to check out the posts that people make on the internet and read job applications to realise how dire the situation is. Also, in my experience (being an engineer), engineers really have useless written English even though communication skills are the number one requested soft skill for an engineer.

columnar64
columnar64

You should also refrain from criticising the English of the residents of other countries when yours is so poor. Let me ask you if you feel the same about the UK or Canada (Canada is just to the north of you).

RMSx32767
RMSx32767

Several: emacs and TECO come to mind.

neilson
neilson

Nobody asks for emacs, but whenever I find a job that actually pays money (none right now) I use emacs unless it is absolutely forbidden to install "foreign" software. You vi people don't know what you're missing. (Let's not start the vi - emacs war here, though. Both are decent tools. It's just that emacs is extensible and Turing-complete, not just a text editor, and for me, it's built into my fingers.) But you're right. I never EVER see ads for people who know vi or emacs. No, instead they want an expert who can make Access function as a distributed database.

Mark Miller
Mark Miller

I wouldn't be so quick to charge age discrimination with the result you got. It would depend on who you were talking to. If you interviewed with a senior engineer, and got that response, well, I'd suspect age discrimination along with you. I just remember hearing the same complaint about 6 years ago, and it was attributed to HR. I remember one guy complaining that he got rejected for a sysadmin position, because they said they needed someone who could run Red Hat Linux (some version), but he had been using Debian, or Suse, name your distribution. He complained that the different versions of Linux are not *that* different, but HR didn't know that. I heard lots of complaints like this back then. HR, no matter the employer, has been notorious for this sort of thing for years. They can kind of rattle off the technical terms, but they have no idea what they mean. The best they can do is look for an exact match in terms between their list of requirements and your resume. They don't understand the subtleties at all. I learned a long time ago that your best bet for finding any job in IT is to at least try to make some technical contacts who work at the companies you're interested in. Pass them your resume and hope for the best. They understand these issues. Try to get an interview with whoever is in charge of hiring software engineers. HR should be in on it at some point in the process, but if you can avoid it, don't let HR be the first one to see your resume. That's just asking to be part of a crapshoot.

dbarry722
dbarry722

I've emailed all concerned so interesting times ahead. It drives me mad at times then as you say, when all goes wrong it's a case of 'why weren't we informed'

jsargent
jsargent

If you aren't used to technical writing then it can be a nightmare. I remember many times being giving the task of technical writing just because I was the only native English speaker in the company. Though the funny thing is is that I thought "man" in unix was rather good. But then again, in the early to mid 80's any documentation seemed like a luxury.

jsargent
jsargent

As an ex-vi, ex-emacs and a person who also learnt ed. I can reassure you that any editor can be learnt with no previous experience. It's what you put in that counts. I have had the unenjoyable experience of learning many editors on mini's and nobody really needs to have previous experience of any of them.

SPGuest
SPGuest

Mark is correct. HR's role is to weed out some or all candidates to make the hiring manager's job easier. Thus they throw out the baby with the bath water. A good friend who is a recruiter for a large software company gets very frustrated with the loss of ability in her profession to find skills and talent. They simply want to get the job done and find 5 suitable candidates which meet their criteria but blame the hiring manager when these 5 do not cut it. Sadly we have created a tick the box world and the crap shoot is even if you get an inside referral you can still fail at HR because of the labels on these check boxes. Even the hiring managers don???t know what the HR team are really looking for.

Mark Miller
Mark Miller

[i]A good friend who is a recruiter for a large software company gets very frustrated with the loss of ability in her profession to find skills and talent.[/i] I've been hearing for years about companies of different varieties, though I used to hear it often from the IT sector, saying, "We can't find the skills we need here." Perhaps what you're describing has something to do with that?

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