Open Source

10 MORE technologies that are just plain broken

Some items from our original broken-tech list have been improved -- making room for a new crop of flawed and poorly implemented systems and technologies.

The last time I visited this topic, my sights were set on various pieces of technology. Some of those are still broken (Acronis, QuickBooks, Flash, Outlook, predictive typing). Others have finally managed to right their ship (Ubuntu Unity, Web browsers, desktop multi-touch). But as flawed technologies get their act together, they make room for more technologies to leap onto the list. That's right, I have 10 more broken pieces of the IT landscape that I want to point out. Let's just dive right into this list and have some fun!

1: GNOME

I wanted to like GNOME 3. Seriously, I did. And I think the developers were on to something quite good when this radical desktop first appeared. But then... the GNOME developers pretty much just stopped listening to the user base. Now a large number of GNOME developers have left the project. The only good news is that GNOME 3 has already been forked. Linux Mint gives us its own GNOME Shell iteration, called Cinnamon. It's not an idea-for-idea clone, but it does seem to be a good mixture of what was GNOME 2.x and what is GNOME 3.

2: Single point of entry/failure

I've hated this concept since day one. Many larger companies deploy tools that integrate numerous tools into one place (ticketing systems, billing system, accounting packages). When that system goes down, nothing can be done. The very idea of single point of entry is flawed by nature. It is inevitable that that single point will go down and work will be lost. The only way around this is seriously costly (redundancy on many levels) and over the heads of most businesses. I may be alone in this thinking, but give me isolated tools for crucial tasks any day.

3: Windows security

No matter what Microsoft does, Windows security is fundamentally flawed. Sure if users could be better educated on how to avoid issues, this might not be such a problem. But we all know that's not going to happen. Nearly every Windows iteration is just a click away from infection. The steps Windows 7 took toward security did little more than annoy its user-base. Until Microsoft completely rethinks and retools its platform, it will be fundamentally flawed and insecure.

4: Printing

I spend a good amount of time every day working with printers. They break. Period. Either the hardware, the software, or the drivers -- something will cause printing to stop functioning. And trying to do cross-platform printing is a nightmare. Why this is still such an issue I will never understand. Until someone finally develops a truly "generic" printer system that all devices can print to, printing will continue to live in the broken category.

5: Office suites

Instead of competing against one another, office suites should work together to create an all-encompassing environment. Until that happens, compatibility will always be an issue. There is a fix for this. That fix is standardization across the board. Without that, office suites will continue to struggle for compatibility. Microsoft has to understand that some businesses and organizations simply can't afford Office, and LibreOffice needs to understand there might be features that users might want (regardless of logic).

6: Exchange logging

One of the tasks I frequently have to do is set up NT Backup jobs just to clear out Exchange logs. The developers of Exchange need to look at the way UNIX and Linux handle logging and give some thought to that type of system. If not, C drives will continue to fill up and Exchange will continue to auto-unmount stores. Sure, you can set up circular logging to resolve this. But for some, circular logging just isn't the solution. Though the UNIX take on logging might not be ideal, it could serve as a good launching point for the Exchange developers to come up with a much better solution than the one they have.

7: Secure boot

Microsoft decided the best way to prevent boot-time malware was to create a system that actually made it easier for virus writers to create boot-time malware. Brilliant! During the process, let's make sure you create an environment that makes it problematic to install other operating systems on a machine. Again, I say, brilliant! Secure boot was a bad idea from the start. Scrap it.

8: Cross-platform technology

Can't we all just get along? There are times when I want to pull my hair out getting Windows and Mac, Windows and Linux, or Linux and Mac to play nicely. And every time I get it working, one of them comes along and breaks that work. Look, I get that you're competition. But in the end, people are going to use what is best for the solution -- so you might as well stop throwing a fit and taking your toys home. This is only going to get worse as environments become more and more homogenized (more Linux and Mac deployments on the way). Platforms: Pick a communication technology, build in standards, and stick to it!

9: Windows 8 Modern UI

This interface is lame on the Windows phone and it's even worse on the desktop. Not only does the Windows 8 UI (formerly Metro) look like a child's toy, it's hardly an efficient use of space and movement. It's clear that Microsoft is shooting for the multi-touch moon, but on a standard desktop, Windows 8 fails. This version will go down as the new Windows Me. Back to the drawing board with you Microsoft!

10: Moving parts

Why is it that hard drives sold in modern machines still have moving parts? Moving parts break -- especially ones spinning at such a fast rate. I understand the cost, but how long can that possibly be an issue? Solid state drives are not only faster, they're more reliable. With no moving parts, there's a smaller chance of something going wrong. Even DVD drives are becoming a thing of the past. With the cost of flash drives so low, it's just as easy to install operating systems from USB. Most software titles are available as downloads as well. Let's reach the point where PCs and laptops have zero moving parts and our technology will be far more reliable.

What else?

So that's my take on the latest list of broken technology. You may not agree with everything here, but perhaps we can all agree that the whole of technology is broken when constituent pieces are so flawed.

Are there other current technologies you think are broken and in need of serious (or even just moderate) repair? If so, share your thoughts.

About

Jack Wallen is an award-winning writer for TechRepublic and Linux.com. He’s an avid promoter of open source and the voice of The Android Expert. For more news about Jack Wallen, visit his website getjackd.net.

288 comments
wayward4now
wayward4now

Posting from Ubuntu 12.10 and Firefox I bet it works.... :) Ric

Jeff_D_Programmer
Jeff_D_Programmer

regarding command-line applications: WTF ARE WE THINKING! Are we still working in 1955? With GUI's being as established and orthodox as they are, not to mention intuitive, why are we, as the drivers of IT, still ALLOWING commandline tools to exist... because they're "powerful"? Certainly not any more so than a properly written replacement with a good GUI! And intuitive?!? Sure, a blinking cursor after a "$>" is so friggin helpful. Almost as much so as the help list that shows up when you enter "help" (which frequently isn't even recognized: "no such command"). It's time we left the command windows (especially "Powershell") back in the tube age with Univac and moved on.

LeftieLouie
LeftieLouie

PRINTERS ! Oh, do I ever agree! Stuck print queues in Windows (reboot all the connected machines, power cycle the printer, oh lovely). Can't print to my local print serve from my iPad, what a crock! Thanks for a good post, I wish there was a way to fix all this. Maybe someday when I'm rich...

martinwtaylor
martinwtaylor

There's nothing wrong with IE9 / 10, they are fast and work reliably. I have seen far more problems with Firefox. So many people here exhibiting unreasoned biases against things that work well. W8 is excellent, highly stable and productive. If you don't like it, say you don't like it. If you say it's broken, that reflects only on your poor ability to differentiate between commonly used English words.

brian.smith
brian.smith

Keeping Windows 8 (PC) and Windows 8 Mobile in step through more than 1 or 2 upgrade cycles will take real determination and a lot of compromises. So much so that I'm not sure it's worth it. Similarity of look and feel might be enough. And Auto Sync (see my earlier post). Staying alive is an altogether different kettle of fish. I really can't see Nokia surviving with what Microsoft are giving them. I waited a long time for Windows Mobile 7 and while I stuck with it, I was in the main, pretty appalled by what eventually arrived (even after Mango). All the things that were wrong with WinMob7 have been documented and I'm not going to recite them here, Suffice to say I waited (and waited, and waited) for WinMob8 only to get a clunker. What MS have spent 2 years doing is beyond me. Some fiddling around the edges but no show stoppers, no game changers such that it isn't immediately obvious what, if anything, has changed between the versions. In tying up with MS Nokia have nailed themselves to a turd and will, inevitably, end up, in a last shake of the dice, a Me Too Android phone maker.

Radio Boogie
Radio Boogie

At least on the AM side, HD (IBOC) is a disaster... A TOTAL disaster. The old C-QuAM/Motorola AM Stereo was worlds better than this failed experiment, which creates massive interference to adjacent stations and reduces the audio response on AM to that of a phone line. Add the fact that you almost have to *see* the towers to get a lock in HD mode on all but the biggest blowtorch stations. AM HD is so bad that there has actually been an increasing number of stations going to AM stereo while HD continues to lose stations. I accept the fact that our current FCC aren't the sharpest tools in the shed, but if it wasn't for the money and politics involved, HD/IBOC on AM would have been a footnote in radio history years ago. The interference potential was foretold years before the FCC approved it's use. What they don't seem to get through their thick heads is that AM HD will *never* work, because of the inherent noise floor on the AM band. Analog is still usable even with the noise while HD can't lock if there is interference. Extreme FAIL!

AES2
AES2

I've seen more misplaced vitriol on Modern UI than I remember on any other subject. I have several clients, unsophisticated computer users but excellent performers in their businesses, who never could figure out Android phones but immediately took to Windows Phones. There are a lot of people with less computer sophistication than those of us who read this site. Modern UI takes nothing away from Desktop, which is still with us, is not deprecated, and will be with us in Windows 9. Modern UI is for apps that want to use it. Desktop is not going anywhere, runs almost anything that runs on Windows 7, and looks different. In my own opinion I didn't like Aero when Vista introduced it, but it grew on me and I now like it better than Windows XP's appearance. I also miss the Start button once in a while, but it's not a major loss. I'm not as concerned about losing Aero and the Start button as I appreciate the better memory management, security, Client Hyper-V, and other features of Windows 8. Existing Desktop applications are still being supported and new ones will continue to be created. I don't need full screen apps on my large monitor so I don't use them. Desktop applications work great and I really don't care about cosmetics.

TechRepublic
TechRepublic

Sorry to capitalise the Subject, but I'm shouting!! About time someone bad-mouthed Win8. I think the 8 suffix is ripe for some new names for what is just a crap idea: WIndows Fate, WindowGate (play here on 8 and Gates from Watrergate), Gates Fate (if Windows 8 is a REAL flop), Gates Hates 8, Always Late, Gates Mate, Windows Irate, Windows Wait. There'll be so many derisory comments for this version of WIndows, that has no place in in a business. Hey, it took me a couple of hours of looking around (I've not read any info about how to use Win8) to work out how to use it. So much for intuition! The move to Win7 was a reasonably smooth one and I have to admit a successful OS from MS, but 8!, it should have taken top spot. It's a business tool (for the lions share of MS revenue), not a freakin'phone! Does MS think everyone is dumb and cannot cope with learning a way with a Desktop OS and a different way with a phone. Dumb Asses!

wamaruna
wamaruna

No moving parts - I agree. Sounds a lot like a tablet. Can we get SSD costs closer to those of mechanical drives? The world has gotten used to $100 or less per terabyte. How big a heat sink to eliminate PSU fans? Or how do we reduce the sources of heat? As for the 'modern' UI critque in Win8, sounds like someone has noticed that the emperor is wearing only his birthday suit. And printers that just work across platforms....ooh... Number One, make it so! Do that, and Linux becomes a real alternative for the masses.

jadcockCC
jadcockCC

I understand some technologies are just plain broke, but it the article makes it sound like these are universal experiences and they are not. Wouldn't it be better to offer a solution or better yet a balanced view?

metramo
metramo

It seems like the author misunderstood "single point of failure". He prefers complexity instead of simplicity. Good luck! When you take hard diskks of an exemple for moving parts that should be removed, is seems more than a religious statement than a pragmatic approach. The hard disk is marvelous example of wher modern tecnology works, where there is perfect competition. It's certainly noty an example of wher moving parts should be banned.

LindseySchollard
LindseySchollard

I agree, for a phone.. great. I am configuring an 8 for the first time for our network and wow is it a challenge to get around with the new UI. I see no added functionality for me in the "metro" or app area. Hopefully the users like it.

ITassasin
ITassasin

I'm convinced that printers are from hell... convinced!

morbiddk
morbiddk

I'm really getting tired of a die hard Linux user/advocate and writer for TR bashing Microsoft the way he does. I really feel he does not fully understand what he is writing about sometimes. Windows 7's UAC was no where near as annoying and hindering as Vista's, which I should point out goes down in line with Windows ME. That said, Windows 7 is presently the most secure version windows to date. I suspect that over time Windows 8 will emerge to overtake Windows 7 in terms of overall security, however for now Windows 7 will remain on top. Windows 8 will be a change for everyone using it, however time and time again Microsoft has driven change within the desktop industry. Whether it be through applications or within the Operating System itself. If you go to a big box retailer now, you will see that most, if not all PC hardware manufacturers are embracing the touch technology that Windows 8 is geared towards. You now have Ultrabooks that fold up to function as a tablet, you have full desktops with large monitors, and you have the all in one systems; all of which utilize various forms of touch screen technology. Windows 8 will take hold and will thrive, however the first year will probably be a bit painful for users. I've been using Windows 8 since the original beta's and while yes it is not exactly geared towards corporations as their next OS, it is very consumer friendly as it is extremely simple to use and navigate once you see where things have moved to. But just like the changes with Office from 2003 to 2007 and on, it will take time to learn where things have moved, but once learned, it will prove to be a much simpler interface to use.

Tiger-Pa
Tiger-Pa

I have two Windows 8 desktop PCs and one laptop, all with Windows Media Center installed. One is a 3 year old HP Pavilion. One is a 5 year old IBM clone that I built. And the laptop is a 3 year old Asus G51Jx. All got Windows 8 Pro 'clean installed' into new partitions, so as not to drag along any corrupt baggage. All of the installs went off without a hitch. I don't understand why many continue to complain about the Win8's UI. The Start Page (Metro) can easily be rearranged to suit your needs unlike a start menu. Frequently used apps can easily be pinned to the Task Bar. It's simple to get to your Desktop (press Win Logo + D) or simply select the Tile. Once you're there, it pretty much looks the same as previous versions of Windows. Windows 8 boots up and shuts down much quicker than previous versions. The ongoing complaints about How difficult it is to Shutdown with no Start Button is inane. All you have to do is use a commonly used 'Ctrl-Alt-Del'. The screen will display a Power button in the bottom, right corner. Virtually everything I've thrown at it seems to work and with little effort involved. That's a lot more than I ca say about Ubuntu, which I've grappled with on the side for 5 years and usually end up with a lot of wasted time and frustration. I plan to purchase a Surface Pro when they're released near the end of January and a Win8 phone on the Lumia 920 as soon as I'm eligible the end of this month. I currently use an iPhone 4 with terrible voice communications and an iPad 3, Wifi only, to amuse myself when I can't sleep (USA Today crosswords, solitaire, and Sudoku). My opinion after supporting all my friends and family members, is that most users never have learned how to use, configure, or maintain any version of Windows. Mostly due to never putting in any time to do so. My wife who is somewhat technically challenged has been stumped by Windows 8 or asked me to resolve an issue for her since her upgrade 3 weeks ago.

mark II
mark II

@Neon Samurai. your comments " The issue is being forced to use the Windows 8 touch interface on Desktop devices which may or may not include" First I'd like to ask you have you ever used windows 8 on a desktop? I'm very certain you have not. I have. i had the windows 8 version after the consumer Preview installed, on an Hp pavillion dv 6000 entertainment pc series, which came pre installed with Vista and has a major Heating issue. i installed windows 8, and the freaking over heating stopped. the touch UI is very very easy to navigate with a mouse and keyboard. i had no problem with it, niether did my wife who who knows nothing about computers as a matter of fact, windows 8 was the first computer she actively started using. because of how easily she was able to interact with the operating system, i intend buying her a Nokia lumnia 920. if you tell me you have no problem using windows 7 but find windows 8 difficult, then you're not being sincere. if you tell me that you hate the fact that there's no start button, well truth is, your start button has been moved to your desktop. in my opinion, windows 8 is the best windows UI i have seen from Microsoft yet. remember the days of windows 95? when Windows Xp came along, it got exactly the same hate, dislike and contempt thrown at it, several years past and it became one of the most popular OS by Microsoft. be open minded about windows 8, and yes it requires a little learning curve but once it sinks in, and you are hooked

th3_sniff
th3_sniff

I guess you can't even remember what security used to be like in pre-sasser/blaster days

orovan
orovan

We have deployed Exchange online AKA Office 365, for several customers over this year. At this point I'm just about tired of apologizing to customers about the shortcoming and dysfunctions of this web interface and screwed up email formatting, not to mention the frequent outages. And don't tell me to use it with Outlook, that POS has been mentioned in previous list for a good reason as it tends to break and cost customer even more money to have it fixed. The sad thing is so many of them are so dependent on this trash email client they are not willing to try anything else. My Google email is so much more capable than the Microsoft competition that it makes me wonder what keep Microsoft two generations behind. Gmail had its own outage today which was very disappointing but they still have a long way to catch up to Microsoft record of outages.

srm
srm

Do you realize what a whiny bunch of crybabies you people sound like? It's like watching George Jetson from the first movie complaining that had to push the button FOUR times today and his finger was throbbing! Seriously, imagine yourself as a Neanderthal who went to High School in the 70's...

djlexr
djlexr

1. "...GNOME is governed along meritocratic principles...." LOL! That is the only response worthy of your whine that they stopped listening to the user base. Did you honestly expect a company that relies on voluntary handouts for income to stay true to the ideal that is GNOME? Did you honestly expect the largely volunteer contributors of code to continue volunteering time unpaid? Seriously, LOL. 2. The single point concept, as you should know by now, is mostly about security and/or integrity of data. Its strength is its weakness, and vice versa. If you did understand the concept of single point of entry, and its strengths and weaknesses, you would not be whining about #3. 3. If you want a secure environment, where you can't do anything you want, have very few options, and are just stuck with what you're given, go to Unix or Mac. Oh, that also means that your beloved *free* open source junk is out of the running, too. 4. Did you really just ask for something that works all the time, never breaks down (mechanically or software), and is compatible with all platforms, regardless of version? Would you also like the printer to magically refill its own paper trays and change out ink/toner cartridges? Maybe the printer should also telepathically guess if you really only meant to print a selection, or the orientation? What else would you like this fictional device to do? 5. "Microsoft has to understand that some businesses and organizations simply can’t afford Office, and LibreOffice needs to understand there might be features that users might want (regardless of logic)." I'm sure if you told your landlord that you couldn't find it in your heart to prioritize paying your lease, that he'd let you keep running your business on premise. If you cannot afford the tools to do the job, find another job. I just don't know where to begin with your statement about LibreOffice. But then again, I paid for my copy of Microsoft Office, and I thought it was a fair price. 6. Error, does not compute. 7. You already complained about Microsoft security. We know you hate Microsoft. We get it. Seriously. Please retitle your article with the appropriate number. 8. Who's throwing the fit? Oh, and this seems to be an extension of your fit from #6. Please retitle your article again. 9. While I do agree with many of your points, I must fairly state that I have not even entertained becoming familiar with the UI...yet. I do understand that, while I may resist certain things that Microsoft may force upon us, some of them do not make sense until I actually take the time to learn them. I'm not saying they are all good, but it's a bad idea to adopt the old dog mindset in the technology industry. 10. Moving parts exist because they are cheaper alternatives to better quality products. As long as cheap people keep buying them, they will continue to be used. From what I gathered of your ranting, you want the following: 1. Everything should be free. 2. Everything should be accessible to everyone, at all cost. 3. Everything should be completely secure, while giving the end user all options. 4. Everything should work, at all times, the way you want it to, forever. 5. Even if you produce the best work, you should not ask people to pay you for your time. Be the better person, and give it away! 6. Every product manufacturer should support other manufacturer's product, even when they won't even support their own product. 7. Microsoft must die! 8. Forget patents, since everything is free! 9. Innovate perfectly the first time. 10. Technology should only allow the best solutions as an option, regardless of cost, for the same cost (heck, it is free, afterall). Did I misunderstand anything you wrote?

JCitizen
JCitizen

but then I love to gripe! ]:) I would bet that fellow TR member M Wagner has it closer to reality - however.

mikifinaz1
mikifinaz1

Your brief paragraphs don't do each topic justice. Like the Metro mess. Windows 8 is a perfect example of why good tech companies are small and quick. Win8 is a typical product made by a group and shows that corp group think. A phone is not a tablet and a tablet is not a PC or laptop. What do these boneheads do no doubt at the prodding of the bean counters? They make one GUI for all devices and as typical of one of these abortions it doesn't work well on any of them. What Microsoft is doing rather than being the "go to" guys for a computer operating system is to try and jump on the pay to play content market. A parade that has past and one they probably won't catch up to any time soon. The "store" is a joke and most of the UI has been twisted to satisfy the lowest common denominator. While I am still forced to use Microsoft products; I have moved to Linux and carry a copy of Win 7 on a USB when I am forced to deal with the Microsoft walking dead.

ownture
ownture

In general moving parts are less reliable than solid state, but I'm unconvinced that SSDs are more reliable than HDs. Against my better judgement, after reading endless descriptions of failures in a 120 GB SSD, I bought one. It was great for about a week. Then one day I faintly smelled that 'roasting electronics smell." My SSD had become a brick with little warning and no chance to recover anything from it. I've never had that experience with an HD. I've never had one that's life wasn't measured in years and I've never bought another SSD since.

kitekrazy
kitekrazy

If it were flawless, nothing would advance. 3: Windows security - I never seem to have any problems. 5: Office suites - do home users really need these? They seem bloated an resource intensive. 8: Cross-platform technology - Linux has to be the worst. How many distros are there now?

josmyth
josmyth

Is it necessary to list ten things even though only seven or eight things belong on the list?

WhiterDragon
WhiterDragon

Your point on hard drives is only half right. While there are no moving parts in SSDs to break, there is a limit to how many time you can write to one before it degrades to being unusable.

wayward4now
wayward4now

I heartily agree... there is way too much brokeness due to Windows wanting/wishing to own the Internet with non-standard protocols, that are subject to change on a whim. Scruum. Ric

rockinra
rockinra

I'm very disappointed in the over all tone of this whole article. I did not finish this article because something of such a negative tone is a waste of my time. Your opinions are very close minded and extremely biased. Sure most of the items you are discussing have there issues but not anywhere to the extent that you are portraying them.

derkesthai
derkesthai

Dear Mr. Jack Wallen, I understand that you are a big fan of Linux. That's all well and dandy and commendable. But this is 90% a Microsoft-bashing post. That's really a shame. Also, please get your facts straight and try to be a bit more objective.

phudson38
phudson38

Printers would be great if people didn't try to "cheap" their needs. A Laser printer is not a replacement for a Lithography Press. You can only print so many books before it trashes.

sher1
sher1

When Gnome 3 came out, people all complained about what was missing, and there were a lot of things. But, as the Gnome team pointed out, the whole reason for the change was to allow users to determine how things would work. extensions.gnome.org has tons of great extensions that add everything back you wanted and allow you wonderful customizations you wouldn't have had before. Stop spouting old stories and try it again. I find it much more usable than the Gnome 2 stuff I have been using for 15 years and am more efficient also.

gruvsf
gruvsf

I specifically take issue with the moving parts section of this article. I have replaced many drives in my professional life, with most of them being HDDs. That being said, most of the drives I have used are HDDs. I have seen USB thumb drives fail at a much higher rate than HDDs, but since flash memory is not moving, it should be so much better, right? Wrong. As HDDs continue to increase to sizes that SDDs can only dream for in another decade, they have gotten better and better, but I can't say that flash memory's rate of failure has gotten any better, so would I rather pay less money for more disk space instead of a bit faster performance? Usually I would. Even Apple's new hybrid hard drives use both, so why would spinning HDDs be dead? Also, onto optical media. I still trust those things at rest more than magnetic tape, HDDs or even flash memory. I know that I'll be able to spin one up 15 years later with the correct equipment and be 100% confident that the data will still be there. Would you trust your HDDs, flash-based devices, or magnetic tapes? I'll bet your entire backup on it.

Gisabun
Gisabun

Why am I not surprised Jack would rant against Microsoft and their technologies. He thinks Windows security is flawed? I wonder if he bothered with any other OS or is just open sourced blind. Secure boot is designed to reduce boot-time malware Jack. Have you seen any boot-time malware affecting a Windows 8 system yet? Share a link. Or are you just crying because you can't dual boot Windows 8 with Linux. Outside of the crummy desktop which you can easily bypass, I don't see what the fuss is with Windows 7 Modern UI. Exchange logging? You're kidding me. How many of us use Exchange? Have a problem with logs? Have you bothered to check "normal" ways of "fixing" the problem. Technologies you [of course] forgot that already broken: Chrome OS Google+ Too many of these useless Linux distros out there.

ManoaHI
ManoaHI

Printing is not an issue for me, because I generally don't print and I always request electronic versions of documents. Most of my work can be done on-line and with smartphones and tablets, I don't need to print. Of course there are some documents that need to printed out and some places now accept e-ink as a valid signature.

zdnet
zdnet

I mean, broken in ways other than it requires a signed UEFI boot manager that must confirm trust, by a hash or certificate, before loading any UEFI and/or OS boot code. I agree that it was initially frustrating that only Microsoft could create a secure boot manager, but the most recent efforts to allow loading of other OSes from an independent secure-boot manager solves much of the problem. When a signed independent boot manager UEFI app is installed onto a machine running in SecureBoot mode, it will be able to hash or validate certificates for any OS code to be booted. It requires human intervention to modify the hash or certificate of code they want to allow to boot securely, and I don't see an easy way for a virus writer to bypass this. (Yes, if a virus is embedded in code before it is hashed or signed, then it will be loaded along with the OS, but this is a vulnerability in any environment, not just SecureBoot. PC-OEMs are just now releasing updates to their UEFI BIOS that are way less buggy than the initial stuff that came out on Win8-compatible hardware. I believe that we're also very close to having an independent boot manager signed by Microsoft that can then maintain a secure list of hash/certificates for OSes it will allow to boot. If the booted OS doesn't continue to make use of the TPM to measure all code before executing it, the resulting security failures are a result of that OS, not of the SecureBoot mechanism itself. However, I do hear that Microsoft has been very arrogant in dealing with the attempts to get such an independent BootManger signed -- but that's a common problem when dealing with Microsoft to get anything from them that doesn't positively impact their bottom line. Come on Microsoft -- sign the damn bootmanager code and put an end to this bad publicity you have invited..

RR Flyer
RR Flyer

It seems as they become more entrenched in their way of doing things, with their favorite operating system, they tend to become very negative about change, or really anything that does not meet their standards, even when they obviously don't know what they are talking about.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

be fed in via other code to interpret them while the Command Line feeds direct into the OS, often the kernel - thus a Command line command can work even when the GUI isn't working right or there are memory issues and the GUI can't be opened.

tech
tech

Jack bashed more than just Microsoft. Besides when you have a damn near monopoly, you are going to get bashed, so buck up and take it. Over sensitive much? Take off those M$ glasses and take a look at the real world would you.

tech
tech

I too have had it installed on 1 machine since the preview days... It is not difficult to 'use' but it is FAR less efficient for someone who tries to actually, I don't know GET WORK DONE. Everything takes more clicks and more motions. Your exactly right about one thing. Windows 8 was made so a three year old could use it. Well I am not 3, and I do have extensive experience with computers. I can't wait to roll out some Win 8 Desktops to some of my clients. I know the exact response I will get when I do. "What the hell, everything I do is three times as many clicks!".... I've said it before, and I will say it again, you can't treat a 23" (or two 23" monitors) like you treat a 4" display. Windows 8 is a nice little 'information consumption engine' but it sucks if you want to get real work done!

gmichaels
gmichaels

I went to High School in the 1960s (graduated 1969.) I guess I'm Cro-Magnon ....

tech
tech

The very title said the article would be negative, so what did you expect? The article was not 'one sided' 1, 2, 4, 8, and 10 are not related to Microsoft specifically. It started off #1 with a Linux Issue (Gnome). 3, 6, 9 speak directly to Microsoft, so what. 5 speaks to M$ and LibreOffice. Nothing stated is untrue. Not sure what you were expecting but for those who aren't looking at things through M$ supplied glasses this is a fair article that hits Microsoft, Gnome (Linux) and LibreOffice (Open Source) all pretty hard. That is what it was meant to do.

Gisabun
Gisabun

And worse for inkjets that you just bought in a store for $25.

Deadly Ernest
Deadly Ernest

Microsoft profits by giving a more secure Vendor Lock-in.